FAQ
I have a project whereby I need it to write out a file to a different
server (that the originating server has write access to). So, say I
need to write out from myserver1, where my app is running, onto, say
S:/IT/tmp how can I specify/do this? Thanks, RVince

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  • John Gordon at Oct 5, 2011 at 3:41 pm

    In <0d795922-d946-480d-8f41-95656e56fa86 at g23g2000vbz.googlegroups.com> RVince <rvince99 at gmail.com> writes:

    I have a project whereby I need it to write out a file to a different
    server (that the originating server has write access to). So, say I
    need to write out from myserver1, where my app is running, onto, say
    S:/IT/tmp how can I specify/do this? Thanks, RVince
    scp file host:/some/location

    --
    John Gordon A is for Amy, who fell down the stairs
    gordon at panix.com B is for Basil, assaulted by bears
    -- Edward Gorey, "The Gashlycrumb Tinies"
  • Terry Reedy at Oct 5, 2011 at 8:11 pm

    On 10/5/2011 10:34 AM, RVince wrote:
    I have a project whereby I need it to write out a file to a different
    server (that the originating server has write access to). So, say I
    need to write out from myserver1, where my app is running, onto, say
    S:/IT/tmp how can I specify/do this? Thanks, RVince
    open('S:/IT/tmp','w') ??

    --
    Terry Jan Reedy
  • John Gordon at Oct 5, 2011 at 9:22 pm

    In <mailman.1758.1317845707.27778.python-list at python.org> Terry Reedy <tjreedy at udel.edu> writes:
    On 10/5/2011 10:34 AM, RVince wrote:
    I have a project whereby I need it to write out a file to a different
    server (that the originating server has write access to). So, say I
    need to write out from myserver1, where my app is running, onto, say
    S:/IT/tmp how can I specify/do this? Thanks, RVince
    open('S:/IT/tmp','w') ??
    I assume he intended "S:" to indicate a remote server.

    --
    John Gordon A is for Amy, who fell down the stairs
    gordon at panix.com B is for Basil, assaulted by bears
    -- Edward Gorey, "The Gashlycrumb Tinies"
  • Chris Angelico at Oct 5, 2011 at 9:31 pm

    On Thu, Oct 6, 2011 at 8:22 AM, John Gordon wrote:
    I assume he intended "S:" to indicate a remote server.
    The most obvious understanding of it is a drive letter (ie Windows
    box). But if not, more clarification is needed.

    ChrisA
  • Terry Reedy at Oct 6, 2011 at 1:36 am

    On 10/5/2011 5:31 PM, Chris Angelico wrote:
    On Thu, Oct 6, 2011 at 8:22 AM, John Gordonwrote:
    I assume he intended "S:" to indicate a remote server.
    The most obvious understanding of it is a drive letter (ie Windows
    box).
    More exactly, a remote server filesystem 'mounted' (not sure of the
    Windows' term) as a local drive. I am pretty sure I have read of this
    being done.
    But if not, more clarification is needed.
    Definitely.

    --
    Terry Jan Reedy
  • Dave Angel at Oct 6, 2011 at 1:14 pm

    On 01/-10/-28163 02:59 PM, Dennis Lee Bieber wrote:
    On Wed, 05 Oct 2011 21:36:34 -0400, Terry Reedy<tjreedy at udel.edu>
    declaimed the following in gmane.comp.python.general:
    On 10/5/2011 5:31 PM, Chris Angelico wrote:
    On Thu, Oct 6, 2011 at 8:22 AM, John Gordonwrote:
    I assume he intended "S:" to indicate a remote server.
    The most obvious understanding of it is a drive letter (ie Windows
    box).
    More exactly, a remote server filesystem 'mounted' (not sure of the
    Windows' term) as a local drive. I am pretty sure I have read of this
    being done.
    <right-click>"My Computer"

    "Map Network Drive"

    So I suspect you could refer to it as a "mapped" filesystem.
    Or you could refer to it as a 'net use' drive, since that's the
    commandline way to mount it on Windoze.

    DaveA

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