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Oops!!! something went wrong with my keyboard. Here you have my full
post:

Ever since I installed my Python 2.6 interpreter (I use IDLE), I've
been saving my
*.py files in the C:\Program Files\Python26 directory, which is the
default directory for such files in my system.

However, I have realised that the above is not the best practice.
Therefore I created the C:\Program Files\Python26\test directory and I
want it to be my default directory for saving *.py files, importing
modules, etc.

I'd like to do something like the DOS equivalent of "CD test" but I
do not know kow to do it.

I am currently doing something really awful: I open a *.py file in the
test subdirectory, I run it with the F5 key and it works! but I am
doing really something stupid.

I can see that it works because if I do

import sys
sys.path

... the first directory in the list is the test one.

How should I proceed, if I want to proceed properly?

Vicente Soler

Search Discussions

  • Gabriel Genellina at Nov 16, 2009 at 1:35 am
    En Sun, 15 Nov 2009 09:04:06 -0300, vsoler <vicente.soler at gmail.com>
    escribi?:
    Ever since I installed my Python 2.6 interpreter (I use IDLE), I've
    been saving my
    *.py files in the C:\Program Files\Python26 directory, which is the
    default directory for such files in my system.

    However, I have realised that the above is not the best practice.
    Therefore I created the C:\Program Files\Python26\test directory and I
    want it to be my default directory for saving *.py files, importing
    modules, etc.
    This is *not* a good place either. Non-privileged users should not have
    write permission in the C:\Program Files directory.
    I'd like to do something like the DOS equivalent of "CD test" but I
    do not know kow to do it.

    I am currently doing something really awful: I open a *.py file in the
    test subdirectory, I run it with the F5 key and it works! but I am
    doing really something stupid.
    "it works!" What's the problem then?
    How should I proceed, if I want to proceed properly?
    Sorry but I don't even see your problem. You can save your .py files
    anywhere you like...

    --
    Gabriel Genellina
  • Vsoler at Nov 16, 2009 at 7:36 pm

    On Nov 16, 2:35?am, "Gabriel Genellina" wrote:
    En Sun, 15 Nov 2009 09:04:06 -0300, vsoler <vicente.so... at gmail.com>
    escribi?:
    Ever since I installed my Python 2.6 interpreter (I use IDLE), I've
    been saving my
    *.py files in the C:\Program Files\Python26 directory, which is the
    default directory for such files in my system.
    However, I have realised that the above is not the best practice.
    Therefore I created the C:\Program Files\Python26\test directory and I
    want it to be my default directory for saving *.py files, importing
    modules, etc.
    This is *not* a good place either. Non-privileged users should not have
    write permission in the C:\Program Files directory.
    I'd like to do something like the DOS equivalent of ? "CD test" but I
    do not know kow to do it.
    I am currently doing something really awful: I open a *.py file in the
    test subdirectory, I run it with the F5 key and it works! but I am
    doing really something stupid.
    "it works!" What's the problem then?
    How should I proceed, if I want to proceed properly?
    Sorry but I don't even see your problem. You can save your .py files ?
    anywhere you like...

    --
    Gabriel Genellina
    Gabriel,

    When I enter IDLE, I'd like to say at the prompt: "my current
    directory is... ...test" and then be able to run a module in that
    directory. This is what my problem is!!!

    Thank you if you can help
  • Chris Rebert at Nov 16, 2009 at 7:45 pm

    On Mon, Nov 16, 2009 at 11:36 AM, vsoler wrote:
    On Nov 16, 2:35?am, "Gabriel Genellina" wrote:
    En Sun, 15 Nov 2009 09:04:06 -0300, vsoler <vicente.so... at gmail.com>
    escribi?:
    Ever since I installed my Python 2.6 interpreter (I use IDLE), I've
    been saving my
    *.py files in the C:\Program Files\Python26 directory, which is the
    default directory for such files in my system.
    However, I have realised that the above is not the best practice.
    Therefore I created the C:\Program Files\Python26\test directory and I
    want it to be my default directory for saving *.py files, importing
    modules, etc.
    This is *not* a good place either. Non-privileged users should not have
    write permission in the C:\Program Files directory.
    I'd like to do something like the DOS equivalent of ? "CD test" but I
    do not know kow to do it.
    I am currently doing something really awful: I open a *.py file in the
    test subdirectory, I run it with the F5 key and it works! but I am
    doing really something stupid.
    "it works!" What's the problem then?
    How should I proceed, if I want to proceed properly?
    Sorry but I don't even see your problem. You can save your .py files
    anywhere you like...

    --
    Gabriel Genellina
    Gabriel,

    When I enter IDLE, I'd like to say at the prompt: "my current
    directory is... ?...test" and then be able to run a module in that
    directory. This is what my problem is!!!
    1. File -> Open
    2. Navigate to file and choose it
    3. Press F5

    Cheers,
    Chris
  • Vsoler at Nov 16, 2009 at 7:56 pm

    On Nov 16, 8:45?pm, Chris Rebert wrote:
    On Mon, Nov 16, 2009 at 11:36 AM, vsoler wrote:
    On Nov 16, 2:35?am, "Gabriel Genellina" <gagsl-... at yahoo.com.ar>
    wrote:
    En Sun, 15 Nov 2009 09:04:06 -0300, vsoler <vicente.so... at gmail.com>
    escribi?:
    Ever since I installed my Python 2.6 interpreter (I use IDLE), I've
    been saving my
    *.py files in the C:\Program Files\Python26 directory, which is the
    default directory for such files in my system.
    However, I have realised that the above is not the best practice.
    Therefore I created the C:\Program Files\Python26\test directory and I
    want it to be my default directory for saving *.py files, importing
    modules, etc.
    This is *not* a good place either. Non-privileged users should not have
    write permission in the C:\Program Files directory.
    I'd like to do something like the DOS equivalent of ? "CD test" but I
    do not know kow to do it.
    I am currently doing something really awful: I open a *.py file in the
    test subdirectory, I run it with the F5 key and it works! but I am
    doing really something stupid.
    "it works!" What's the problem then?
    How should I proceed, if I want to proceed properly?
    Sorry but I don't even see your problem. You can save your .py files
    anywhere you like...
    --
    Gabriel Genellina
    Gabriel,
    When I enter IDLE, I'd like to say at the prompt: "my current
    directory is... ?...test" and then be able to run a module in that
    directory. This is what my problem is!!!
    1. File -> Open
    2. Navigate to file and choose it
    3. Press F5

    Cheers,
    Chris
    --http://blog.rebertia.com
    Say that you wanted to import a file in the test directory after just
    entering IDLE. How would you do it?
  • Rami Chowdhury at Nov 16, 2009 at 8:10 pm

    On Mon, 16 Nov 2009 11:56:49 -0800, vsoler wrote:
    On Nov 16, 8:45?pm, Chris Rebert wrote:
    On Mon, Nov 16, 2009 at 11:36 AM, vsoler <vicente.so... at gmail.com>
    wrote:
    On Nov 16, 2:35?am, "Gabriel Genellina" <gagsl-... at yahoo.com.ar>
    wrote:
    En Sun, 15 Nov 2009 09:04:06 -0300, vsoler <vicente.so... at gmail.com>
    escribi?:
    Ever since I installed my Python 2.6 interpreter (I use IDLE), I've
    been saving my
    *.py files in the C:\Program Files\Python26 directory, which is the
    default directory for such files in my system.
    However, I have realised that the above is not the best practice.
    Therefore I created the C:\Program Files\Python26\test directory
    and I
    want it to be my default directory for saving *.py files, importing
    modules, etc.
    This is *not* a good place either. Non-privileged users should not
    have
    write permission in the C:\Program Files directory.
    I'd like to do something like the DOS equivalent of ? "CD test"
    but I
    do not know kow to do it.
    I am currently doing something really awful: I open a *.py file in
    the
    test subdirectory, I run it with the F5 key and it works! but I am
    doing really something stupid.
    "it works!" What's the problem then?
    How should I proceed, if I want to proceed properly?
    Sorry but I don't even see your problem. You can save your .py files
    anywhere you like...
    --
    Gabriel Genellina
    Gabriel,
    When I enter IDLE, I'd like to say at the prompt: "my current
    directory is... ?...test" and then be able to run a module in that
    directory. This is what my problem is!!!
    1. File -> Open
    2. Navigate to file and choose it
    3. Press F5

    Cheers,
    Chris
    --http://blog.rebertia.com
    Say that you wanted to import a file in the test directory after just
    entering IDLE. How would you do it?
    http://docs.python.org/library/os.html#os.chdir and
    http://docs.python.org/library/sys.html#sys.path may be able to help you...



    --
    Rami Chowdhury
    "Never attribute to malice that which can be attributed to stupidity" --
    Hanlon's Razor
    408-597-7068 (US) / 07875-841-046 (UK) / 0189-245544 (BD)
  • Chris Rebert at Nov 16, 2009 at 8:11 pm

    On Mon, Nov 16, 2009 at 11:56 AM, vsoler wrote:
    On Nov 16, 8:45?pm, Chris Rebert wrote:
    On Mon, Nov 16, 2009 at 11:36 AM, vsoler wrote:
    On Nov 16, 2:35?am, "Gabriel Genellina" <gagsl-... at yahoo.com.ar>
    wrote:
    En Sun, 15 Nov 2009 09:04:06 -0300, vsoler <vicente.so... at gmail.com>
    escribi?:
    Ever since I installed my Python 2.6 interpreter (I use IDLE), I've
    been saving my
    *.py files in the C:\Program Files\Python26 directory, which is the
    default directory for such files in my system.
    However, I have realised that the above is not the best practice.
    Therefore I created the C:\Program Files\Python26\test directory and I
    want it to be my default directory for saving *.py files, importing
    modules, etc.
    This is *not* a good place either. Non-privileged users should not have
    write permission in the C:\Program Files directory.
    I'd like to do something like the DOS equivalent of ? "CD test" but I
    do not know kow to do it.
    I am currently doing something really awful: I open a *.py file in the
    test subdirectory, I run it with the F5 key and it works! but I am
    doing really something stupid.
    "it works!" What's the problem then?
    How should I proceed, if I want to proceed properly?
    Sorry but I don't even see your problem. You can save your .py files
    anywhere you like...
    When I enter IDLE, I'd like to say at the prompt: "my current
    directory is... ?...test" and then be able to run a module in that
    directory. This is what my problem is!!!
    1. File -> Open
    2. Navigate to file and choose it
    3. Press F5
    Say that you wanted to import a file in the test directory after just
    entering IDLE. How would you do it?
    import sys
    sys.path.insert(0, "C:/path/to/test/dir/here")
    import something_in_test_dir

    Cheers,
    Chris
  • Dave Angel at Nov 16, 2009 at 9:10 pm

    Chris Rebert wrote:
    On Mon, Nov 16, 2009 at 11:56 AM, vsoler wrote:
    On Nov 16, 8:45 pm, Chris Rebert wrote:
    On Mon, Nov 16, 2009 at 11:36 AM, vsoler wrote:

    On Nov 16, 2:35 am, "Gabriel Genellina" <gagsl-... at yahoo.com.ar>
    wrote:
    En Sun, 15 Nov 2009 09:04:06 -0300, vsoler <vicente.so... at gmail.com>
    escribi?:
    Ever since I installed my Python 2.6 interpreter (I use IDLE), I've
    been saving my
    *.py files in the C:\Program Files\Python26 directory, which is the
    default directory for such files in my system.

    However, I have realised that the above is not the best practice.
    Therefore I created the C:\Program Files\Python26\test directory and I
    want it to be my default directory for saving *.py files, importing
    modules, etc.
    This is *not* a good place either. Non-privileged users should not have
    write permission in the C:\Program Files directory.
    I'd like to do something like the DOS equivalent of "CD test" but I
    do not know kow to do it.

    I am currently doing something really awful: I open a *.py file in the
    test subdirectory, I run it with the F5 key and it works! but I am
    doing really something stupid.
    "it works!" What's the problem then?
    How should I proceed, if I want to proceed properly?
    Sorry but I don't even see your problem. You can save your .py files
    anywhere you like...
    When I enter IDLE, I'd like to say at the prompt: "my current
    directory is... ...test" and then be able to run a module in that
    directory. This is what my problem is!!!
    1. File -> Open
    2. Navigate to file and choose it
    3. Press F5
    Say that you wanted to import a file in the test directory after just
    entering IDLE. How would you do it?
    import sys
    sys.path.insert(0, "C:/path/to/test/dir/here")
    import something_in_test_dir

    Cheers,
    Chris
    --
    http://blog.rebertia.com
    Change directory to the test-directory
    Then run idle
  • Gabriel Genellina at Nov 16, 2009 at 10:54 pm

    En Mon, 16 Nov 2009 18:10:51 -0300, Dave Angel <davea at ieee.org> escribi?:
    Chris Rebert wrote:
    On Mon, Nov 16, 2009 at 11:56 AM, vsoler <vicente.soler at gmail.com>
    wrote:
    When I enter IDLE, I'd like to say at the prompt: "my current
    directory is... ...test" and then be able to run a module in that
    directory. This is what my problem is!!!
    Change directory to the test-directory
    Then run idle
    Or, modify the Initial Directory in the menu shortcut that you use to
    start IDLE (right click, Properties). Or create another shortcut in your
    desktop using your desired initial directory.

    --
    Gabriel Genellina

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postedNov 15, '09 at 12:04p
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