FAQ
Is there anywhere I can download a set of Python
binaries, of any version, that have been built
with Visual C++ 8.0?

I'm trying to hook Python up to Sketchup 7 on
Windows, and I think I'm having problems because
Sketchup is linked with msvcr80.dll.

--
Greg

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  • Carl Banks at Feb 9, 2009 at 7:14 am

    On Feb 8, 10:51?pm, Greg Ewing wrote:
    Is there anywhere I can download a set of Python
    binaries, of any version, that have been built
    with Visual C++ 8.0?

    I'm trying to hook Python up to Sketchup 7 on
    Windows, and I think I'm having problems because
    Sketchup is linked with msvcr80.dll.
    I'm pretty sure 2.6.1 is compiled with 8.0. However, I think the
    Visual C++ 8.0 uses msvcrt90.dll.

    Take a look at this bug report to see if it's related to your issue:

    http://bugs.python.org/issue4566


    Carl Banks
  • David Cournapeau at Feb 9, 2009 at 7:48 am

    On Mon, Feb 9, 2009 at 4:14 PM, Carl Banks wrote:
    On Feb 8, 10:51 pm, Greg Ewing wrote:
    Is there anywhere I can download a set of Python
    binaries, of any version, that have been built
    with Visual C++ 8.0?

    I'm trying to hook Python up to Sketchup 7 on
    Windows, and I think I'm having problems because
    Sketchup is linked with msvcr80.dll.
    I'm pretty sure 2.6.1 is compiled with 8.0.
    Hm, I have just run python to check: it is built with MSC v.1500,
    which corresponds to VS 2008, e.g. VS 9, at least on 32 bits.

    David
  • Tim Roberts at Feb 10, 2009 at 7:34 am

    Carl Banks wrote:
    I'm pretty sure 2.6.1 is compiled with 8.0. However, I think the
    Visual C++ 8.0 uses msvcrt90.dll.
    No, the two digits of the DLL match the version number of C++. The
    confusion arises because the product is called "Visual Studio 2008", but it
    includes Visual C++ 9.0, and hence msvcrt90.dll. People say "VC8" when
    they really mean Visual Studio 2008.

    Visual Studio 98 - VC++ 6.0
    Visual Studio 2002 - VC++ 7.0
    Visual Studio 2003 - VC++ 7.1
    Visual Studio 2005 - VC++ 8.0
    Visual Studio 2008 - VC++ 9.0
    --
    Tim Roberts, timr at probo.com
    Providenza & Boekelheide, Inc.
  • BearophileHUGS at Feb 10, 2009 at 12:29 pm

    Paul Rubin:
    Gideon Smeding of the University of
    Utrecht has written a masters' thesis titled "An executable
    operational semantics for Python".
    A significant part of Computer Science is a waste of time and money.

    Bye,
    bearophile
  • Delaney, Timothy (Tim) at Feb 10, 2009 at 10:31 pm

    bearophileHUGS at lycos.com wrote:

    Paul Rubin:
    Gideon Smeding of the University of
    Utrecht has written a masters' thesis titled "An executable
    operational semantics for Python".
    A significant part of Computer Science is a waste of time and money.
    The same can be said for any research. Can you predict ahead of time
    which research will be useful, and which won't? If so (and you can prove
    it) why aren't you making unbelievable amounts of money?

    Tim Delaney
  • Tim Roberts at Feb 12, 2009 at 6:58 am

    Paul Rubin wrote:
    In case anyone is interested: Gideon Smeding of the University of
    Utrecht has written a masters' thesis titled "An executable
    operational semantics for Python".
    That's an interesting grammatical construct. I would have said either
    "Executable operational semantics for Python," or "An executable
    operational semantic for Python."

    "A semantics" just doesn't flow.
    --
    Tim Roberts, timr at probo.com
    Providenza & Boekelheide, Inc.
  • Carl Banks at Feb 13, 2009 at 4:17 am

    On Feb 9, 11:34?pm, Tim Roberts wrote:
    Carl Banks wrote:
    I'm pretty sure 2.6.1 is compiled with 8.0. ?However, I think the
    Visual C++ 8.0 uses msvcrt90.dll.
    No, the two digits of the DLL match the version number of C++. ?The
    confusion arises because the product is called "Visual Studio 2008", but it
    includes Visual C++ 9.0, and hence msvcrt90.dll. ?People say "VC8" when
    they really mean Visual Studio 2008.

    ? Visual Studio 98 ? ?- ?VC++ 6.0
    ? Visual Studio 2002 ?- ?VC++ 7.0
    ? Visual Studio 2003 ?- ?VC++ 7.1
    ? Visual Studio 2005 ?- ?VC++ 8.0
    ? Visual Studio 2008 ?- ?VC++ 9.0
    Ah, that explains a lot.


    Carl Banks
  • Mark Hammond at Feb 9, 2009 at 9:32 am

    On 9/02/2009 5:51 PM, Greg Ewing wrote:
    Is there anywhere I can download a set of Python
    binaries, of any version, that have been built
    with Visual C++ 8.0?
    IIRC, no. Python skipped that version of MSVC. I believe Python 2.5
    builds easily with vc8 project files in svn though.
    I'm trying to hook Python up to Sketchup 7 on
    Windows, and I think I'm having problems because
    Sketchup is linked with msvcr80.dll.
    What problems specifically? The only practical problems you should see
    will arise if you try and pass a "FILE *", or allocate memory you then
    ask python to free (or vice-versa) - both should be avoidable though...

    Mark
  • Greg at Feb 10, 2009 at 10:57 am

    Mark Hammond wrote:

    What problems specifically? The only practical problems you should see
    will arise if you try and pass a "FILE *", or allocate memory you then
    ask python to free (or vice-versa) - both should be avoidable though...
    It concerns a Ruby plugin for Sketchup that embeds a Python
    interpreter and acts as a bridge between Ruby and Python.
    I'm using Sketchup 7 which uses msvcrt80.dll, and includes
    a Ruby dll which is presumably also linked against that
    crt.

    I've made some progress on the issue. One problem turned out to
    be a result of allocating something with ruby_xmalloc() and
    freeing it with free(), which was easy to fix.

    Another one seemed to be something to do with trying to use
    a global var that points to the current Ruby stack frame. I
    don't really know what was happening, but I found another way
    of doing things that sidestepped the issue.

    I've now got it working, at first sight anyhow, using Python 2.3.

    But it doesn't work properly with Python 2.5. The problem
    appears to be related to compiling .py files to .pyc. The
    first time I run it and try to import a module, a .pyc is
    generated, but then a crash occurs when trying to call one
    of the functions imported from it. If I run it a second time,
    with the previously generated .pyc in place, it runs successfully.

    Which makes me think it may be some kind of FILE * problem,
    but I'm not sure what, since all the stdio operations on
    the files concerned should be getting done by Python.

    To add insult to injury, it's proving to be very difficult
    to debug, because Sketchup seems to crash all on its own
    when run under gdb on Windows, even when I don't load any
    of my code. So I can't get a traceback of where the crash
    is occurring.

    There's one possibility I just thought of -- Python may
    be trying to write something to stdout or stderr, in which
    case it will probably be using the wrong crt to do it.
    Something to look into after I've got some sleep...

    --
    Greg

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postedFeb 9, '09 at 6:51a
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