FAQ
Hello all,

I'm new to python, new as newbies get, so please, don't take wrongly
if this seems like a stupid or overly simple question.

I'm going through examples in a book I have ("Beginning python", by
Hetland Marcus) and I just started doing wxPython examples.

But every sample I try, for example:

import wx
app = wx.App()
win = wx.Frame(None, title="Simple editor")
loadButton = wx.Button(win, label='Open')
saveButton = wx.Button(win, label='Save')
win.Show
app.MainLoop()

closes too fast. After running in python IDLE just the line
=== restart ===
shows up.

How can I keep the window to "stay alive" so I see what I get ?
I'm on a winxp platform using python 2.5.2. if that matters.

Please, any help, constructive advice and ideas are very much
appreciated.

Best regards
Ivan Reborin

Search Discussions

  • Ivan Reborin at Aug 15, 2008 at 5:17 pm

    On Fri, 15 Aug 2008 18:31:16 +0200, Ivan Reborin wrote:
    Hello all,

    I'm new to python, new as newbies get, so please, don't take wrongly
    if this seems like a stupid or overly simple question.

    I'm going through examples in a book I have ("Beginning python", by
    Hetland Marcus) and I just started doing wxPython examples.

    But every sample I try, for example:

    import wx
    app = wx.App()
    win = wx.Frame(None, title="Simple editor")
    loadButton = wx.Button(win, label='Open')
    saveButton = wx.Button(win, label='Save')
    win.Show
    app.MainLoop()

    closes too fast. After running in python IDLE just the line
    === restart ===
    shows up.

    How can I keep the window to "stay alive" so I see what I get ?
    I'm on a winxp platform using python 2.5.2. if that matters.

    Please, any help, constructive advice and ideas are very much
    appreciated.

    Best regards
    Ivan Reborin
    I would just add that actually the process doesn't finish at all. When
    I look at the task manager, the process pythonw.exe stays there (about
    22mb memory).

    Tkinter examples work on the other hand.

    And, just another question, if I may while I'm here. The reason that
    I'm learning python (apart from finishing my degree :) is that I'm
    trying to create a gui for my fortran subroutines:
    - back calculating in fortran, very time consuming processes (about
    15min per calculation on 2ghz dual core cpu, and I have a lot of
    those) so I'm not even thinking of doing it in any other languages,
    and a gui in python which will have to draw some x-y diagrams as a
    result of the calculation
    I choose python because I like the syntax and 'its way of thinking',
    and because I've heard it has a good reputation of 'getting along'
    with other languages.

    Has anyone done something like this ? Is there any differences,
    advantages and disadvantages against one or the other gui-s currently
    available (i like wxpython and tkinter for now, as I've heard a lot of
    good comments about them) ?

    I would appreciate your opinion, if you can spare the time. All
    comments would be greatly appreciated.

    Best regards
    Ivan Reborin

    p.s. Sorry if my english is not so good. It's not my main language,
    actually, not even my secondary language :-( but I'm trying to improve
    it.
  • Brian Victor at Aug 15, 2008 at 5:48 pm

    Ivan Reborin wrote:
    win.Show
    This line isn't doing anything. It needs to be:
    win.Show() # note the parentheses

    --
    Brian
  • S0suk3 at Aug 15, 2008 at 6:01 pm

    On Aug 15, 11:31 am, Ivan Reborin wrote:
    Hello all,

    I'm new to python, new as newbies get, so please, don't take wrongly
    if this seems like a stupid or overly simple question.

    I'm going through examples in a book I have ("Beginning python", by
    Hetland Marcus) and I just started doing wxPython examples.

    But every sample I try, for example:

    import wx
    app = wx.App()
    win = wx.Frame(None, title="Simple editor")
    loadButton = wx.Button(win, label='Open')
    saveButton = wx.Button(win, label='Save')
    win.Show
    app.MainLoop()
    There are a couple of things you're missing. Here is the fix:

    import wx

    # First of all, I'd recommend you to pass False as
    # the 'redirect' parameter, so that any errors appear
    # on the console
    app = wx.App(redirect=False)

    win = wx.Frame(None, title="Simple editor")
    loadButton = wx.Button(win, label='Open')
    saveButton = wx.Button(win, label='Save')

    # Now you need to set the frame as the top-level
    # window

    app.SetTopWindow(frame)

    # In the line
    #
    # win.Show
    #
    # Python recognizes this as a method, but you're
    # not calling it, so its value is discarded. It's
    # a meaningless, albeit legal statement.

    win.Show()

    # Now, let the fun begin
    app.MainLoop()

    # Sebastian
  • Mike Driscoll at Aug 15, 2008 at 6:03 pm

    On Aug 15, 11:31?am, Ivan Reborin wrote:
    Hello all,

    I'm new to python, new as newbies get, so please, don't take wrongly
    if this seems like a stupid or overly simple question.

    I'm going through examples in a book I have ("Beginning python", by
    Hetland Marcus) and I just started doing wxPython examples.

    But every sample I try, for example:

    import wx
    app = wx.App()
    win = wx.Frame(None, title="Simple editor")
    loadButton = wx.Button(win, label='Open')
    saveButton = wx.Button(win, label='Save')
    win.Show
    app.MainLoop()

    closes too fast. After running in python IDLE just the line
    === restart ===
    shows up.

    How can I keep the window to "stay alive" so I see what I get ?
    I'm on a winxp platform using python 2.5.2. if that matters.

    Please, any help, constructive advice and ideas are very much
    appreciated.

    Best regards
    Ivan Reborin
    See what Brian said about your issue. As for whether or not this
    toolkit is for you, that's a subjective question. Try them both and
    see which one suits you. I like wx better, but I needed its widgets
    for what I was doing and Tkinter didn't seem to have what I needed at
    the time.

    Anyway, wxPython has an excellent user's group, where you can learn
    lots and the group is nice to new people too!

    http://wxpython.org/maillist.php

    Mike
  • David C. Ullrich at Aug 16, 2008 at 4:12 pm
    In article <adbba4hok1sg0b2d8dc1flaic8j197s2tj at 4ax.com>,
    Ivan Reborin wrote:
    Hello all,

    I'm new to python, new as newbies get, so please, don't take wrongly
    if this seems like a stupid or overly simple question.

    I'm going through examples in a book I have ("Beginning python", by
    Hetland Marcus) and I just started doing wxPython examples.

    But every sample I try, for example:

    import wx
    app = wx.App()
    win = wx.Frame(None, title="Simple editor")
    loadButton = wx.Button(win, label='Open')
    saveButton = wx.Button(win, label='Save')
    win.Show
    app.MainLoop()
    As mentioned, it should be win.Show().

    If that doesn't help, try saving it to something.py
    and executing that instead of running it inside IDLE.
    closes too fast. After running in python IDLE just the line
    === restart ===
    shows up.

    How can I keep the window to "stay alive" so I see what I get ?
    I'm on a winxp platform using python 2.5.2. if that matters.

    Please, any help, constructive advice and ideas are very much
    appreciated.

    Best regards
    Ivan Reborin
    --
    David C. Ullrich
  • Ivan Reborin at Aug 16, 2008 at 7:30 pm

    On Fri, 15 Aug 2008 17:48:39 +0000 (UTC), Brian Victor wrote:

    Ivan Reborin wrote:
    win.Show
    This line isn't doing anything. It needs to be:
    win.Show() # note the parentheses
    Yes, that was the problem. I must've been tired while writing it, for
    I haven't noticed it after several repetitions.
    Thank you (and everyone else on their useful comments and
    suggestions).

    Best regards
    Ivan

Related Discussions

Discussion Navigation
viewthread | post
Discussion Overview
grouppython-list @
categoriespython
postedAug 15, '08 at 4:31p
activeAug 16, '08 at 7:30p
posts7
users5
websitepython.org

People

Translate

site design / logo © 2022 Grokbase