FAQ
Split File Fullpath Into Parts

Xah Lee, 20051016

Often, we are given a file fullpath and we need to split it into the
directory name and file name. The file name is often split into a core
part and a extension part. For example:

'/Users/t/web/perl-python/I_Love_You.html'
becomes

'/Users/t/web/perl-python/' (directory name)
'I_Love_You' (file's base name)
'.html' (file's ?extension?)


Depending on the language, some language will remove the trailing slash
after the dir name, and some will omit the dot before the suffix.

In Python, to split a full path into parts is done with the os.path
module. Example:

# python
import os.path

myPath = '/Users/t/web/perl-python/I_Love_You.html'
(dirName, fileName) = os.path.split(myPath)
(fileBaseName, fileExtension)=os.path.splitext(fileName)

print dirName # /Users/t/web/perl-python
print fileName # I_Love_You.html
print fileBaseName # I_Love_You
print fileExtension # .html


The official doc of the os.path module is at:
http://www.python.org/doc/2.4.1/lib/module-os.path.html

In Perl, spliting a full path into parts is done like this:

# perl
use File::Basename;

$myPath = '/Users/t/web/perl-python/I_Love_You.html';

($fileBaseName, $dirName, $fileExtension) = fileparse($myPath,
('\.html') );

print $fileBaseName, "\n"; # I_Love_You
print $dirName, "\n"; # /Users/t/web/perl-python/
print $fileExtension, "\n"; # .html


Note: the second argument to fileparse() is a list of regex. In
particular, you need to escape the dot.

For the official doc, type in command line: ?perldoc File::Path?.
------
This post is archived at
http://xahlee.org/perl-python/split_fullpath.html

Schemers, a scsh version will be appreciated.

Xah
xah at xahlee.org
? http://xahlee.org/

Search Discussions

  • Dr.Ruud at Oct 17, 2005 at 11:50 am

    Xah Lee:

    In Perl, spliting a full path into parts is done like this:
    And then follows Perl-code that only works with an optional .html
    "extension",
    which is similar to the code in the File::Basename description.
    http://www.perl.com/doc/manual/html/lib/File/Basename.html


    It is best practice to derive and store the normalized (or absolute)
    path, because relative paths can get loose so will get loose.


    Consider this:

    $myPath = './example/basename.ext';


    and this:

    $myPath = './example/filename.1.23.45-beta';


    and this:

    $myPath = 'x:.\example\basename.ext';


    (some platforms have a wd per device)


    --
    Affijn, Ruud

    "Gewoon is een tijger."
  • Xah Lee at Oct 17, 2005 at 9:33 pm

    Xah Lee wrote:
    In Perl, spliting a full path into parts is done like this:
    Dr.Ruud wrote:
    And then follows Perl-code that only works with an optional .html
    "extension",
    Thanks for the note. I've corrected it here:
    http://xahlee.org/perl-python/split_fullpath.html

    namely:
    Note: the second argument to fileparse() is a list of regex. In
    particular, you need to escape the dot. Normally, one gives it a value
    such as ('\.html', '\.HTML', '\.jpg', '\.JPG'). Yes, it is case
    sensitive. If you want to match any extension (that is, the string
    after the last dot), use ('\.[^.]+$').

    Xah
    xah at xahlee.org
    ? http://xahlee.org/
  • Matteo d'addio 81 at Oct 17, 2005 at 8:36 pm
    Hello, I'm a cs student from Milano (Italy).
    I don't use scsh fequently but this should work:

    (open srfi-11 ;let-values
    srfi-28) ;format

    (define my-path "/Users/t/web/perl-python/I_Love_You.html")

    (let-values (((dir-name
    file-base-name
    file-extension) (parse-file-name my-path)))

    (format "~a~%" dir-name) ;/Users/t/web/perl-python/
    (format "~a~%" file-base-name) ;I_Love_You
    (format "~a~%" file-extension)) ;.html

    You can find more useful function here (scsh reference manual):
    http://www.scsh.net/docu/html/man-Z-H-6.html#node_sec_5.1

    matteo

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