FAQ
Hi everyone,
I have a question about clients (on windows) uploading Excel
spreadsheets (.xls) to a unix server. These spreadsheets contain
information that wil be used to store and update a database. I need to
be able to safely pass the information in the spreadsheet so that I
can parse it and update accordingly. However, when I upload through my
web page, the text that once was a nicely formatted excel spreadsheet
becomes jarbled and illegible. Passing the information (presumably
through a large string) messes it up understandably as there are text
format issues and such. I've explored such things as the COM and
win32com modules but am a little hesitant as my CGI script is not
operating on a windows platform. I'm using Python 2.2. Can someone
point me in the right direction? Thanks!

Chris

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  • Emile van Sebille at Jul 12, 2002 at 12:10 am
    Chris
    I have a question about clients (on windows) uploading Excel
    spreadsheets (.xls) to a unix server. These spreadsheets contain
    information that wil be used to store and update a database. I need to
    be able to safely pass the information in the spreadsheet so that I
    can parse it and update accordingly. However, when I upload through my
    web page, the text that once was a nicely formatted excel spreadsheet
    becomes jarbled and illegible. Passing the information (presumably
    through a large string) messes it up understandably as there are text
    format issues and such. I've explored such things as the COM and
    win32com modules but am a little hesitant as my CGI script is not
    operating on a windows platform. I'm using Python 2.2. Can someone
    point me in the right direction? Thanks!
    The easy answer is to save in excel as tab delimited output and upload
    that.

    Maybe someone else knows an easy answer to the hard answer? ;-)

    --

    Emile van Sebille
    emile at fenx.com

    ---------
  • Moray Taylor at Jul 12, 2002 at 9:15 am
    "Emile van Sebille" <emile at fenx.com> wrote in message news:<l8pX8.154754$Uu2.34782 at sccrnsc03>...
    Chris
    I have a question about clients (on windows) uploading Excel
    spreadsheets (.xls) to a unix server. These spreadsheets contain
    information that wil be used to store and update a database. I need to
    be able to safely pass the information in the spreadsheet so that I
    can parse it and update accordingly. However, when I upload through my
    web page, the text that once was a nicely formatted excel spreadsheet
    becomes jarbled and illegible. Passing the information (presumably
    through a large string) messes it up understandably as there are text
    format issues and such. I've explored such things as the COM and
    win32com modules but am a little hesitant as my CGI script is not
    operating on a windows platform. I'm using Python 2.2. Can someone
    point me in the right direction? Thanks!
    The easy answer is to save in excel as tab delimited output and upload
    that.

    Maybe someone else knows an easy answer to the hard answer? ;-)
    Are you sure there isn't any FTP going on here, FTP has ASCII and
    BINARY transfer systems, if you use the ASCII one on a BINARY file, it
    will fry it.

    Moray
  • Ddoc at Jul 12, 2002 at 11:52 am

    Chris wrote:

    Hi everyone,
    I have a question about clients (on windows) uploading Excel
    spreadsheets (.xls) to a unix server.
    Why http?
    Why not use a script that uploads them by FTP, using bnary mode?

    If it is going from a Windows machine then provide the script with the user
    name and password in it, run a a menu item from the start button.

    I just say that anything in a particualr directory will go to the distant
    server, but if users insist on saving things all over the place you could
    have it ask which file first.

    --
    A

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