FAQ
Hello,

I have not played much with mailman but I am curious about something. I
inherited a machine that runs mailman and one of the lists is setup through
postfix aliases to do the following:

blah-subscribe /usr/lib/mailman/mail/mailman subscribe blah
blah-join /usr/lib/mailman/mail/mailman join blah

How do I find out what "mailman join blah" resolves to? I guess my question
is ultimately - where do I look to find out who gets the join and subscribe
requests? For fun I subscribed to the "blah" list and never received a
reply. I looked at the mail logs on the same machine and found an entry
along the lines of:

Apr 19 20:19:07 (242320 blah: pending <name> <email> <ip>

There are a bunch of lines below mentioning other users subscribing to the
same list and their requests being approved.

I realize each machine can be set up differently to process mail but
ultimately I am curious as to what mailman join <list name> actually does.

Thanks!
OD

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  • Mark Sapiro at Apr 21, 2011 at 7:02 pm

    Ognen Duzlevski wrote:
    I have not played much with mailman but I am curious about something. I
    inherited a machine that runs mailman and one of the lists is setup through
    postfix aliases to do the following:

    blah-subscribe /usr/lib/mailman/mail/mailman subscribe blah
    blah-join /usr/lib/mailman/mail/mailman join blah

    Actually, I suspect those aliases look like

    blah-subscribe: "|/usr/lib/mailman/mail/mailman subscribe blah"
    blah-join: "|/usr/lib/mailman/mail/mailman join blah"

    How do I find out what "mailman join blah" resolves to? I guess my question
    is ultimately - where do I look to find out who gets the join and subscribe
    requests?

    The MTA processes that alias by piping the message to say 'blah-join'
    to the command '/usr/lib/mailman/mail/mailman join blah'.
    /usr/lib/mailman/mail/mailman is a wrapper which will ultimately
    deliver the message in this case to a script named (probably)
    /usr/lib/mailman/scripts/join which in turn will queue the message for
    Mailman's CommandRunner which will ultimately process the subscription
    request.

    For fun I subscribed to the "blah" list and never received a
    reply. I looked at the mail logs on the same machine and found an entry
    along the lines of:

    Apr 19 20:19:07 (242320 blah: pending <name> <email> <ip>

    That specific entry looks like an entry from Mailman's 'subscribe' log
    which says the subscription request for the blah list was received via
    the web from <ip> and a confirmation request was sent to <email> and
    Mailman is waiting for the user to confirm. If in fact it had an IP
    address, it resulted from a web subscribe and had nothing to do with
    an email to blah-join.

    If you didn't receive the confirmation request, check the MTA logs to
    see what happened to it.

    Also, check the MTA logs to see what happened to the mail to blah-join.

    There are a bunch of lines below mentioning other users subscribing to the
    same list and their requests being approved.

    I realize each machine can be set up differently to process mail but
    ultimately I am curious as to what mailman join <list name> actually does.

    As described above, it causes Mailman to process the message as a
    request from the sender to join <list name>.

    --
    Mark Sapiro <mark at msapiro.net> The highway is for gamblers,
    San Francisco Bay Area, California better use your sense - B. Dylan
  • Lucio Chiappetti at Apr 22, 2011 at 10:19 am

    On Thu, 21 Apr 2011, Mark Sapiro wrote:
    Ognen Duzlevski wrote:
    How do I find out what "mailman join blah" resolves to? I guess my
    question is ultimately - where do I look to find out who gets the join
    and subscribe requests?
    The MTA processes that ...
    I guess the OP did not want to know how mailman works, but who is the list
    administrator for list "blah" ... after all he inherited a system set up
    by somebody else. I hope somebody told him the master password !

    I guess that doing http://hiswebaddress/mailman/admin
    he can see all the publicly advertised lists, and then enter each list
    administration panel.

    And if the list is not public, he should be able to do
    http://hiswebaddress/mailman/admin/blah

    Is that what the OP was asking ?
  • Ognen Duzlevski at Apr 22, 2011 at 12:18 pm

    On Thu, Apr 21, 2011 at 3:02 PM, Mark Sapiro wrote:

    Ognen Duzlevski wrote:
    I have not played much with mailman but I am curious about something. I
    inherited a machine that runs mailman and one of the lists is setup through
    postfix aliases to do the following:

    blah-subscribe /usr/lib/mailman/mail/mailman subscribe blah
    blah-join /usr/lib/mailman/mail/mailman join blah

    Actually, I suspect those aliases look like

    blah-subscribe: "|/usr/lib/mailman/mail/mailman subscribe blah"
    blah-join: "|/usr/lib/mailman/mail/mailman join blah"

    How do I find out what "mailman join blah" resolves to? I guess my question
    is ultimately - where do I look to find out who gets the join and subscribe
    requests?

    The MTA processes that alias by piping the message to say 'blah-join'
    to the command '/usr/lib/mailman/mail/mailman join blah'.
    /usr/lib/mailman/mail/mailman is a wrapper which will ultimately
    deliver the message in this case to a script named (probably)
    /usr/lib/mailman/scripts/join which in turn will queue the message for
    Mailman's CommandRunner which will ultimately process the subscription
    request.

    For fun I subscribed to the "blah" list and never received a
    reply. I looked at the mail logs on the same machine and found an entry
    along the lines of:

    Apr 19 20:19:07 (242320 blah: pending <name> <email> <ip>

    That specific entry looks like an entry from Mailman's 'subscribe' log
    which says the subscription request for the blah list was received via
    the web from <ip> and a confirmation request was sent to <email> and
    Mailman is waiting for the user to confirm. If in fact it had an IP
    address, it resulted from a web subscribe and had nothing to do with
    an email to blah-join.

    If you didn't receive the confirmation request, check the MTA logs to
    see what happened to it.

    Also, check the MTA logs to see what happened to the mail to blah-join.

    There are a bunch of lines below mentioning other users subscribing to the
    same list and their requests being approved.

    I realize each machine can be set up differently to process mail but
    ultimately I am curious as to what mailman join <list name> actually does.

    As described above, it causes Mailman to process the message as a
    request from the sender to join <list name>.

    --
    Mark Sapiro <mark at msapiro.net> The highway is for gamblers,
    San Francisco Bay Area, California better use your sense - B. Dylan
    Mark,

    Thank you very much for the detailed reply - this is exactly what I was
    looking for!

    Ognen

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postedApr 21, '11 at 2:01p
activeApr 22, '11 at 12:18p
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