FAQ
Hi everyone-
I couldn't find an answer to this question in any of my searches, so I'm
asking the list. I feel pretty stupid making the assumptions I did to get
myself into this mess, but here it goes:

Some time ago, I was asked to administer a mailing list for a group under
their domain name. When the community never developed, the group asking me
to administer basically disbanded. I thought nothing of it until a few
months ago, I learned that people were still receiving monthly reminders
from Mailman of their list information. They want me to turn the list off so
the people who had subscribed will stop receiving monthly reminders of the
disappointing end of the list.

But between then and now, the group let the domain name lapse and someone
else now owns the domain name. Thus I can no longer get to the Mailman list
admin website to turn the list off.

I contacted the web host and they were "unresponsive."

Is there some other way to stop the list?

Thanks very much,
Amos

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  • Mark Sapiro at Dec 3, 2008 at 4:46 pm

    Amos Glenn wrote:
    But between then and now, the group let the domain name lapse and someone
    else now owns the domain name. Thus I can no longer get to the Mailman list
    admin website to turn the list off.

    Access the web admin interface using the IP address of the server
    rather than the domain name in the host part of the URL.

    --
    Mark Sapiro <mark at msapiro.net> The highway is for gamblers,
    San Francisco Bay Area, California better use your sense - B. Dylan
  • Stephen J. Turnbull at Dec 3, 2008 at 6:28 pm

    Mark Sapiro writes:
    Amos Glenn wrote:
    > >
    But between then and now, the group let the domain name lapse and someone
    else now owns the domain name. Thus I can no longer get to the Mailman list
    admin website to turn the list off.
    >
    Access the web admin interface using the IP address of the server
    rather than the domain name in the host part of the URL.
    Will that actually work in a virtual hosting environment?
  • Brad Knowles at Dec 3, 2008 at 6:30 pm

    Stephen J. Turnbull wrote:

    Access the web admin interface using the IP address of the server
    rather than the domain name in the host part of the URL.
    Will that actually work in a virtual hosting environment?
    Depends on how the virtual hosting environment was set up. If they gave you
    a unique IP address for your service (presumably so that you can do both
    HTTP and SSL-enabled HTTPS), then yes -- that should work.

    If not, then the OP may be screwed.

    --
    Brad Knowles <brad at shub-internet.org>
    LinkedIn Profile: <http://tinyurl.com/y8kpxu>
  • Stephen J. Turnbull at Dec 3, 2008 at 4:57 pm
    Amos Glenn writes:
    But between then and now, the group let the domain name lapse and someone
    else now owns the domain name. Thus I can no longer get to the Mailman list
    admin website to turn the list off. >
    I contacted the web host and they were "unresponsive."
    What do you mean by "web host"? The owners of the domain name? They
    very likely can't do anything about it anyway, because they have no
    access to the hardware where Mailman is actually running. In that
    case you simply need to get in touch with the service that was running
    Mailman for you.

    If you mean the host where Mailman is running is unresponsive, there
    is nothing you can do except call the cops and tell them the host is
    spamming your ex subscribers and won't stop.
  • Amos Glenn at Dec 4, 2008 at 1:10 am
    Stephen wins the cupie doll.
    The low-tech route was successful. "Unresponsive" turned to "very responsive
    with stunningly short turn around time" when the issue of spam was brought
    up in connection to various authorities (not the cops, though). Someone was
    spooked. Really, though, it's too bad; I was kinda looking forward to the
    tech challenge.

    Thanks for all your ideas and assistance.

    ~Amos
    On Wed, Dec 3, 2008 at 11:57 AM, Stephen J. Turnbull wrote:

    Amos Glenn writes:
    But between then and now, the group let the domain name lapse and someone
    else now owns the domain name. Thus I can no longer get to the Mailman list
    admin website to turn the list off.

    I contacted the web host and they were "unresponsive."
    What do you mean by "web host"? The owners of the domain name? They
    very likely can't do anything about it anyway, because they have no
    access to the hardware where Mailman is actually running. In that
    case you simply need to get in touch with the service that was running
    Mailman for you.

    If you mean the host where Mailman is running is unresponsive, there
    is nothing you can do except call the cops and tell them the host is
    spamming your ex subscribers and won't stop.

    --
    Rev. R. Amos Glenn
    Pastor/Principal, Pittsburgh New Church and School
    299 Le Roi Road, Pittsburgh, PA, 15208, USA
    www.amosglenn.com/contact
    www.pittsburghnewchurch.org
  • Jan Steinman at Dec 3, 2008 at 5:33 pm

    From: "Amos Glenn" <amosglenn at gmail.com>

    ... the group let the domain name lapse and someone
    else now owns the domain name. Thus I can no longer get to the
    Mailman list
    admin website to turn the list off.

    I contacted the web host and they were "unresponsive."
    <rant>Don't get me started on this topic! I have been fighting to
    reinstate a lapsed domain name for one of my clients for a YEAR now!
    The original registrar (RegisterFly -- avoid like the plague!) went
    bankrupt, and they went dark for a couple months, and didn't notify my
    client their name lapsed. Then another registrar took over the name,
    again without notifying the registrant. Now RegisterFly is re-org'd
    and back in business, but they won't reinstate the name, pointing to
    the other registrar (ENOM), who points back. WHAT A MESS!</rant>

    Moral of the story, don't EVER let a domain name lapse if you think
    you might want it again. Unless you've got very deep pockets.
    Is there some other way to stop the list?

    On the other hand, I'm amazed it is still up and running. I would
    write to the new owners, pointing out that it is in their best
    interest to stop this "parasitic" use of their resources, that they
    are paying for. If that doesn't get results, I'd start slamming the
    list with thousands of messages (yea, I know, unkind to the hapless
    subscribers) in the hope that all the bounces and admin backscatter
    will spur the new domain owner into action.


    :::: Securely there being a gradation which is done the picture whose
    also noise is little, seeing, is feeling difference potato. -- from a
    Google translation of a Japanese camera review ::::
    :::: Jan Steinman http://www.VeggieVanGogh.com ::::
  • Jan Steinman at Dec 3, 2008 at 6:16 pm

    From: Jan Steinman <Jan at Bytesmiths.com>

    I'd start slamming the list with thousands of messages (yea, I know,
    unkind to the hapless subscribers) in the hope that all the bounces
    and admin backscatter will spur the new domain owner into action.
    Before everyone starts jumping all over me for writing this, I should
    have bracketed that with <sarcasm>...</sarcasm> Please don't do that.

    Mark's suggestion that you politely tell the hosting service that the
    list will be reported to various spam cops as a spam site should get
    results. Do "whois domainname" to find out the email addresses of
    people who can help you.

    :::: The Earth isn't a pizza. You can't dial up and have one
    delivered! -- Alf ::::
    :::: Jan Steinman <http://www.EcoReality.org> ::::
  • Andrew Hodgson at Dec 3, 2008 at 6:35 pm

    Amos Glenn wrote:
    But between then and now, the group let the domain name lapse and someone
    else now owns the domain name. Thus I can no longer get to the Mailman list
    admin website to turn the list off.
    There are a couple of techy ways you could do this:

    - Point the hosts file at the relevant IP address of the web server you use to manage the domain/Mailman setup, then point a web browser at it. It should work locally.

    - If you have a local DNS server, and you know the authoritative DNS servers provided by the original web host, create a stub zone with the relevant NS records pointing to those nameservers. When a client using that nameserver tries to resolve the relevant domain name, the DNS resolver should look up and return the records from the old webhost.

    Thanks.
    Andrew.
  • Grant Taylor at Dec 4, 2008 at 4:41 am

    On 12/03/2008 12:35 PM, Andrew Hodgson wrote:
    There are a couple of techy ways you could do this:

    - Point the hosts file at the relevant IP address of the web server
    you use to manage the domain/Mailman setup, then point a web browser
    at it. It should work locally.

    - If you have a local DNS server, and you know the authoritative DNS
    servers provided by the original web host, create a stub zone with
    the relevant NS records pointing to those nameservers. When a client
    using that nameserver tries to resolve the relevant domain name, the
    DNS resolver should look up and return the records from the old
    webhost.
    Hat's off to you Andrew. I was going to recommend the exact same thing.
    I just wanted to see if any one else thought of this.

    I'll give a little more detail on how to do this so it is easier for the OP.

    On a Windows NT/2k/XP/2k3/2k8/Vista system, you need to edit the "hosts"
    file, which should be located in the %SystemRoot%\system32\drivers\etc
    directory (%SystemRoot% usually evaluates to C:\Windows or C:\WinNT
    depending on version). You need to add a new line any where in the file
    that has the IP address and a few spaces and the domain name (with or
    with out the www.). Close your web browser that you want to use, flush
    your DNS ("ipconfig /flushdns" at a command prompt, or just reboot),
    re-open your web browser and try the domain name. To remove the
    listing, just delete the line from the hosts file and re-flush things.

    On a unix system, you will need root (or comparable) access to edit the
    /etc/hosts file, with the same type of routine as above. I don't know a
    convenient way to flush DNS on a unix box, so just try closing and
    re-opening your web browser.

    On a Mac... Sorry, I don't know on a Mac. OS X (any release) should be
    similar to unix (seeing as how it is a BSD and all). As for Classic OS
    (1-9) I have *NO* clue.

    If any one wants an explanation as to why or how this works, just ask.



    Grant. . . .

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postedDec 1, '08 at 7:01p
activeDec 4, '08 at 4:41a
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