I just went to do my usual merge from the git version of HEAD (at
git://git.postgresql.org/git/postgresql.git), and it seemed to be
doing an awful lot of work to prepare to attempt the merge. That
leads me to think that the newly converted git, or a copy of it, is
now at that location, which is cool. But I have concerns about what
to do with my development branch off the old one.

I'm afraid that in spite of several attempts, I don't yet properly
have my head around the git approach, and fear that I'll muck things
up without a little direction; and I'd be surprised if I'm the only
one in this position.

Can someone give advice, preferably in the form of a "recipe", for
how to set up a new repo here based on the newly converted repo, and
merge the work from my branch (with all the related history) into a
branch off the new repo?

Thanks for any advice.

-Kevin

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  • Heikki Linnakangas at Sep 21, 2010 at 3:41 pm

    On 21/09/10 18:28, Kevin Grittner wrote:
    I just went to do my usual merge from the git version of HEAD (at
    git://git.postgresql.org/git/postgresql.git), and it seemed to be
    doing an awful lot of work to prepare to attempt the merge. That
    leads me to think that the newly converted git, or a copy of it, is
    now at that location, which is cool. But I have concerns about what
    to do with my development branch off the old one.

    I'm afraid that in spite of several attempts, I don't yet properly
    have my head around the git approach, and fear that I'll muck things
    up without a little direction; and I'd be surprised if I'm the only
    one in this position.

    Can someone give advice, preferably in the form of a "recipe", for
    how to set up a new repo here based on the newly converted repo, and
    merge the work from my branch (with all the related history) into a
    branch off the new repo?
    Some ideas:

    A) Generate a patch in the old repo, and apply it to the new one.
    Simple, but you lose the history.

    B) git rebase. First "git fetch" the new upstream repository into your
    local repository, and use git rebase to apply all the commits in your
    private branch over the new upstream branch. You will likely get some
    conflicts and will need to resolve them by hand, but if you're lucky
    it's not a lot of work.

    C) Git grafts. I just tested this method for our internal EDB
    repository, and seems to work pretty well. You will need one line in
    your .git/info/grafts file for each merge commit with upstream that you
    have made. On each line you have 1. commitid of the merge commit 2.
    commitid of the old PostgreSQL commit that was merged 3. commitid of the
    corresponding PostgreSQL commit in the new repository. This lets you
    continue working on your repository as you used to, merging and all, but
    git diff will show that all the $PostgreSQL$ are different from the new
    upstream repository.

    I'd suggest that you just do A) and keep the old repository around for
    reference.

    --
    Heikki Linnakangas
    EnterpriseDB http://www.enterprisedb.com
  • Andrew Dunstan at Sep 21, 2010 at 3:59 pm

    On 09/21/2010 11:28 AM, Kevin Grittner wrote:
    I just went to do my usual merge from the git version of HEAD (at
    git://git.postgresql.org/git/postgresql.git), and it seemed to be
    doing an awful lot of work to prepare to attempt the merge. That
    leads me to think that the newly converted git, or a copy of it, is
    now at that location, which is cool. But I have concerns about what
    to do with my development branch off the old one.

    I'm afraid that in spite of several attempts, I don't yet properly
    have my head around the git approach, and fear that I'll muck things
    up without a little direction; and I'd be surprised if I'm the only
    one in this position.

    Can someone give advice, preferably in the form of a "recipe", for
    how to set up a new repo here based on the newly converted repo, and
    merge the work from my branch (with all the related history) into a
    branch off the new repo?
    I was just mentioning to Magnus a couple of hours ago on chat that this
    would create headaches for some people.

    Basically, AIUI, you have to move the old repo aside and freshly clone
    the new repo.

    I haven't migrated my development trees yet, but I'm planning on simply
    applying a diff from the old repo to a newly created branch in the new
    repo. However, that does mean losing the private commit history. I'm not
    sure much can be done about that, unless you migrate each commit
    separately, which could be painful. Maybe some of the git gurus have
    better ideas, though.


    cheers

    andrew
  • Aidan Van Dyk at Sep 21, 2010 at 4:07 pm
    * Andrew Dunstan [100921 11:59]:
    >
    I was just mentioning to Magnus a couple of hours ago on chat that this
    would create headaches for some people.

    Basically, AIUI, you have to move the old repo aside and freshly clone
    the new repo.

    I haven't migrated my development trees yet, but I'm planning on simply
    applying a diff from the old repo to a newly created branch in the new
    repo. However, that does mean losing the private commit history. I'm not
    sure much can be done about that, unless you migrate each commit
    separately, which could be painful. Maybe some of the git gurus have
    better ideas, though.
    Someone mentioned "git rebase". That' probably going to be slow on
    distint repositories too. The grafts mentioned will speed that up.

    But probably the easiest way, if you have a nice clean history, is to
    use "git formatpatch". This produces a nice "series" of patches, with
    your commit message, and content, and dates, all preserved, ready for
    re-applying (git am can do that automatically on the new branch), or
    emailing, or whatever.

    If you're history is a complicated tangle of merges because you
    constantly just re-merge the "CVS HEAD" into your dev branch, then it
    might be time to just do a massive "diff" and "apply" anyways ;-)

    a.

    --
    Aidan Van Dyk Create like a god,
    aidan@highrise.ca command like a king,
    http://www.highrise.ca/ work like a slave.
  • Andrew Dunstan at Sep 21, 2010 at 4:16 pm

    On 09/21/2010 12:07 PM, Aidan Van Dyk wrote:
    But probably the easiest way, if you have a nice clean history, is to
    use "git formatpatch". This produces a nice "series" of patches, with
    your commit message, and content, and dates, all preserved, ready for
    re-applying (git am can do that automatically on the new branch), or
    emailing, or whatever.
    Ah. I thought there was something like this but for some reason when I
    went looking for it just now I failed to find it.

    Thanks for the info. This looks like the best way to go.

    cheers

    andrew
  • Kevin Grittner at Sep 21, 2010 at 4:09 pm

    Andrew Dunstan wrote:

    Basically, AIUI, you have to move the old repo aside and freshly
    clone the new repo.
    I was assuming that, but it's good to have confirmation. What about
    my repo at

    http://git.postgresql.org/gitweb?p=users/kgrittn/postgres.git ?

    Can that be reset to a copy of the new repo? (Or is that not really
    beneficial?)
    I haven't migrated my development trees yet, but I'm planning on
    simply applying a diff from the old repo to a newly created branch
    in the new repo. However, that does mean losing the private commit
    history.
    Yeah, I'd really rather not lose that.
    I'm not sure much can be done about that, unless you migrate each
    commit separately, which could be painful.
    Perhaps. I might be able to use grep and sed to script it, though.
    Right now I think I'd be alright to just pick off commits where the
    committer was myself or Dan Ports. My bash-fu is tolerably good for
    such purposes.
    Maybe some of the git gurus have better ideas, though.
    I'm all ears. ;-)

    -Kevin
  • Elvis Pranskevichus at Sep 21, 2010 at 4:15 pm

    On September 21, 2010 12:08:49 pm Kevin Grittner wrote:
    Andrew Dunstan wrote:
    Basically, AIUI, you have to move the old repo aside and freshly
    clone the new repo.
    I was assuming that, but it's good to have confirmation. What about
    my repo at

    http://git.postgresql.org/gitweb?p=users/kgrittn/postgres.git ?

    Can that be reset to a copy of the new repo? (Or is that not really
    beneficial?)
    I haven't migrated my development trees yet, but I'm planning on
    simply applying a diff from the old repo to a newly created branch
    in the new repo. However, that does mean losing the private commit
    history.
    Yeah, I'd really rather not lose that.
    I'm not sure much can be done about that, unless you migrate each
    commit separately, which could be painful.
    Perhaps. I might be able to use grep and sed to script it, though.
    Right now I think I'd be alright to just pick off commits where the
    committer was myself or Dan Ports. My bash-fu is tolerably good for
    such purposes.
    Maybe some of the git gurus have better ideas, though.
    I'm all ears. ;-)

    -Kevin
    Here's a quick and easy way to move dev history to a new repo:

    $ cd postgresql.old
    $ git checkout yourbranch

    # stream your commits into a "patch mailbox"
    $ git format-patch --stdout master..HEAD > patches.mbox

    # switch to the new repo
    $ cd ../postgresql

    # create a branch if not already
    $ git checkout -b yourbranch

    # apply the "patch mailbox"
    $ git am ../postgresql.old/patches.mbox

    That should do the trick. Your dev history will be kept.


    Elvis
  • Kevin Grittner at Sep 21, 2010 at 6:01 pm

    Elvis Pranskevichus wrote:

    Here's a quick and easy way to move dev history to a new repo:

    $ cd postgresql.old
    $ git checkout yourbranch

    # stream your commits into a "patch mailbox"
    $ git format-patch --stdout master..HEAD > patches.mbox

    # switch to the new repo
    $ cd ../postgresql

    # create a branch if not already
    $ git checkout -b yourbranch

    # apply the "patch mailbox"
    $ git am ../postgresql.old/patches.mbox

    That should do the trick. Your dev history will be kept.
    Thanks for the recipe. (And thanks to all others who responded.)

    That still leaves me wondering how I get that out to my public git
    repo without someone resetting it on the server. Or do I have the
    ability to clean out the old stuff at:

    ssh://git@git.postgresql.org/users/kgrittn/postgres.git

    so that I can push the result of the above to it cleanly?

    -Kevin
  • Magnus Hagander at Sep 21, 2010 at 6:04 pm

    On Tue, Sep 21, 2010 at 20:01, Kevin Grittner wrote:
    Elvis Pranskevichus wrote:
    Here's a quick and easy way to move dev history to a new repo:

    $ cd postgresql.old
    $ git checkout yourbranch

    # stream your commits into a "patch mailbox"
    $ git format-patch --stdout master..HEAD > patches.mbox

    # switch to the new repo
    $ cd ../postgresql

    # create a branch if not already
    $ git checkout -b yourbranch

    # apply the "patch mailbox"
    $ git am ../postgresql.old/patches.mbox

    That should do the trick.  Your dev history will be kept.
    Thanks for the recipe.  (And thanks to all others who responded.)

    That still leaves me wondering how I get that out to my public git
    repo without someone resetting it on the server.  Or do I have the
    ability to clean out the old stuff at:

    ssh://git@git.postgresql.org/users/kgrittn/postgres.git

    so that I can push the result of the above to it cleanly?
    a git push *should* work, but we've seen issues with that.

    The cleanest is probably if I wipe the repo on git.postgresql.org for
    you, and you then re-push from scratch. Does thta work for you?
  • Kevin Grittner at Sep 21, 2010 at 6:16 pm

    Magnus Hagander wrote:

    The cleanest is probably if I wipe the repo on git.postgresql.org
    for you, and you then re-push from scratch. Does thta work for
    you?
    Sure. Thanks.

    -Kevin
  • Magnus Hagander at Sep 21, 2010 at 6:24 pm

    On Tue, Sep 21, 2010 at 20:16, Kevin Grittner wrote:
    Magnus Hagander wrote:
    The cleanest is probably if I wipe the repo on git.postgresql.org
    for you, and you then re-push from scratch. Does thta work for
    you?
    Sure.  Thanks.
    done, should be available for push now.
  • Peter Eisentraut at Sep 21, 2010 at 6:29 pm

    On tis, 2010-09-21 at 20:04 +0200, Magnus Hagander wrote:
    The cleanest is probably if I wipe the repo on git.postgresql.org for
    you, and you then re-push from scratch.
    We probably need a solution that doesn't require manual intervention for
    everyone separately.
  • Magnus Hagander at Sep 21, 2010 at 6:38 pm

    On Tue, Sep 21, 2010 at 20:28, Peter Eisentraut wrote:
    On tis, 2010-09-21 at 20:04 +0200, Magnus Hagander wrote:
    The cleanest is probably if I wipe the repo on git.postgresql.org for
    you, and you then re-push from scratch.
    We probably need a solution that doesn't require manual intervention for
    everyone separately.
    Are there really that many? If nothing else, it's a good way to figure
    out which repos are actually used ;)
  • Heikki Linnakangas at Sep 21, 2010 at 6:09 pm

    On 21/09/10 21:01, Kevin Grittner wrote:
    That still leaves me wondering how I get that out to my public git
    repo without someone resetting it on the server. Or do I have the
    ability to clean out the old stuff at:

    ssh://git@git.postgresql.org/users/kgrittn/postgres.git

    so that I can push the result of the above to it cleanly?
    git push --force allows you to push the new branches over the old ones.

    I don't think it will automatically garbage collect the old stuff
    though, so the repository will be bloated until "git gc" runs (with
    --aggressive or something, not sure). I don't know when or how that
    happens in the public repos.

    --
    Heikki Linnakangas
    EnterpriseDB http://www.enterprisedb.com
  • Kevin Grittner at Sep 21, 2010 at 11:33 pm

    Elvis Pranskevichus wrote:

    # apply the "patch mailbox"
    $ git am ../postgresql.old/patches.mbox
    That's not working for me.

    Applying: Provide two macros for categorizing current transaction
    isolation level (IsXactIsoLevelXactSnapshotBased and
    IsXactIsoLevelFullySerializable) to replace the
    IsXactIsoLevelSerializable macro. Adjust comments to reflect the
    distinction, and rename a now-misleading variable.
    error: patch failed: src/backend/catalog/index.c:2133
    error: src/backend/catalog/index.c: patch does not apply
    error: patch failed: src/backend/commands/trigger.c:2319
    error: src/backend/commands/trigger.c: patch does not apply
    error: patch failed: src/backend/executor/execMain.c:1538
    error: src/backend/executor/execMain.c: patch does not apply
    error: patch failed: src/backend/executor/nodeLockRows.c:130
    error: src/backend/executor/nodeLockRows.c: patch does not apply
    error: patch failed: src/backend/executor/nodeModifyTable.c:326
    error: src/backend/executor/nodeModifyTable.c: patch does not apply
    error: patch failed: src/backend/utils/adt/ri_triggers.c:3314
    error: src/backend/utils/adt/ri_triggers.c: patch does not apply
    error: patch failed: src/backend/utils/time/snapmgr.c:37
    error: src/backend/utils/time/snapmgr.c: patch does not apply
    error: patch failed: src/include/access/xact.h:32
    error: src/include/access/xact.h: patch does not apply
    Patch failed at 0001 Provide two macros for categorizing current
    transaction isolation level (IsXactIsoLevelXactSnapshotBased and
    IsXactIsoLevelFullySerializable) to replace the
    IsXactIsoLevelSerializable macro. Adjust comments to reflect the
    distinction, and rename a now-misleading variable.
    When you have resolved this problem run "git am --resolved".
    If you would prefer to skip this patch, instead run "git am --skip".
    To restore the original branch and stop patching run "git am
    --abort".

    For the record, this branch was regularly merged with changes from
    the master branch of the old PostgreSQL git repo which was a copy of
    CVS head. I filtered out the 167 non-merge commits on my
    serializable branch since 8 Jan 2010. Is there any practical way to
    resolve this so that I can keep the history?

    -Kevin
  • Elvis Pranskevichus at Sep 22, 2010 at 12:06 am

    On September 21, 2010 07:32:57 pm Kevin Grittner wrote:
    Elvis Pranskevichus wrote:
    # apply the "patch mailbox"
    $ git am ../postgresql.old/patches.mbox
    That's not working for me.

    Applying: Provide two macros for categorizing current transaction
    isolation level (IsXactIsoLevelXactSnapshotBased and
    IsXactIsoLevelFullySerializable) to replace the
    IsXactIsoLevelSerializable macro. Adjust comments to reflect the
    distinction, and rename a now-misleading variable.
    error: patch failed: src/backend/catalog/index.c:2133
    error: src/backend/catalog/index.c: patch does not apply
    error: patch failed: src/backend/commands/trigger.c:2319
    error: src/backend/commands/trigger.c: patch does not apply
    error: patch failed: src/backend/executor/execMain.c:1538
    error: src/backend/executor/execMain.c: patch does not apply
    error: patch failed: src/backend/executor/nodeLockRows.c:130
    error: src/backend/executor/nodeLockRows.c: patch does not apply
    error: patch failed: src/backend/executor/nodeModifyTable.c:326
    error: src/backend/executor/nodeModifyTable.c: patch does not apply
    error: patch failed: src/backend/utils/adt/ri_triggers.c:3314
    error: src/backend/utils/adt/ri_triggers.c: patch does not apply
    error: patch failed: src/backend/utils/time/snapmgr.c:37
    error: src/backend/utils/time/snapmgr.c: patch does not apply
    error: patch failed: src/include/access/xact.h:32
    error: src/include/access/xact.h: patch does not apply
    Patch failed at 0001 Provide two macros for categorizing current
    transaction isolation level (IsXactIsoLevelXactSnapshotBased and
    IsXactIsoLevelFullySerializable) to replace the
    IsXactIsoLevelSerializable macro. Adjust comments to reflect the
    distinction, and rename a now-misleading variable.
    When you have resolved this problem run "git am --resolved".
    If you would prefer to skip this patch, instead run "git am --skip".
    To restore the original branch and stop patching run "git am
    --abort".

    For the record, this branch was regularly merged with changes from
    the master branch of the old PostgreSQL git repo which was a copy of
    CVS head. I filtered out the 167 non-merge commits on my
    serializable branch since 8 Jan 2010. Is there any practical way to
    resolve this so that I can keep the history?

    -Kevin
    Instead of filtering non-merge commits I would suggest doing git rebase on the
    latest revision of the old git repo. That way you will get a set of commits
    that should apply cleanly. The reason it is failing now is that it is
    impossible for git am to do a 3-way merge without the original git objects,
    which are obviously not available in the new repo.


    Elvis
  • Kevin Grittner at Sep 22, 2010 at 3:43 pm

    Elvis Pranskevichus wrote:

    Instead of filtering non-merge commits I would suggest doing git
    rebase on the latest revision of the old git repo. That way you
    will get a set of commits that should apply cleanly. The reason
    it is failing now is that it is impossible for git am to do a
    3-way merge without the original git objects, which are obviously
    not available in the new repo.
    Well, that didn't work much better. It applied, but it started in
    June, and the "big" file, which has been in constant flux since
    January suddenly springs into existence in July. :-( The last few
    commits look right, but it gets pretty trashy pretty quickly before
    that.

    What *did* work is to take a fresh of the new repo, branch it as of
    the point in time that I created my original branch, and take the
    first mbox entry of the 167, which starts like this:

    From 07ea78aaafe22cbbb0ffdedbfcf78404abbdbc70 Mon Sep 17 00:00:00
    2001
    From: Kevin Grittner <Kevin.Grittner@wicourts.gov>
    Date: Fri, 8 Jan 2010 15:39:12 -0600

    and change the first line to point to the point at which this was
    applied:

    From 369494e41fe408f103884032f477555ba134a0a8 Fri Jan 8 09:06:05
    2010

    That applies fine. It's an encouraging start, but I'm not clear on
    exactly what I have to do to get the rest of these commits merged in
    with commits from the master branch cleanly. Some fix-up work is OK
    with me. Do I need to look at the old log and manually interleave
    merges to the branch and manual commits in the original pattern to
    make such a scheme work?

    -Kevin
  • Kevin Grittner at Sep 22, 2010 at 5:20 pm

    "Kevin Grittner" wrote:

    Well, that didn't work much better.
    I decided I'd reached my limit on this. I fell back to a suggestion
    made a while back, and just created a patch from the old repository
    and applied it to the new one. I've pushed it to the public repo,
    but haven't yet had a chance to confirm that all is well. I will
    keep the old repo in case there is any need to prove the development
    history. (Unlikely, but it seems prudent to cover the bases.)

    So, no further advice on this topic needed here.

    -Kevin
  • Abhijit Menon-Sen at Sep 21, 2010 at 4:21 pm

    At 2010-09-21 11:59:09 -0400, andrew@dunslane.net wrote:
    However, that does mean losing the private commit history. I'm not
    sure much can be done about that, unless you migrate each commit
    separately, which could be painful.
    It doesn't have to be painful.

    Determine what patches from the old repository you want to apply, and
    create a branch in the newly-cloned repository to apply them to. Then
    use (cd ../oldrepo;git format-patch -k --stdout R1..R2)|git am -3 -k"
    to apply a series of patches (between revisions R1 and R2; adjust as
    needed) to your branch (i.e. when you have it checked out).

    See git-format-patch(1) and git-am(1) for more details (or feel free
    to ask if you need more help).

    -- ams

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