My server ran out of disk space because my archive directory was full
ow write ahead logs.

My warm standby had lost it's mounted NFS volume and thus stopped
reading in the archives from the master.

Would I have run out of space if the standby hadn't stopped reading
them in?

I.e, should I be deleting the old logs myself or should the warm
standby be managing them?


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  • Darcy Buskermolen at Jan 18, 2008 at 6:18 pm

    On Friday 18 January 2008 09:17:10 Glyn Astill wrote:
    My server ran out of disk space because my archive directory was full
    ow write ahead logs.

    My warm standby had lost it's mounted NFS volume and thus stopped
    reading in the archives from the master.

    Would I have run out of space if the standby hadn't stopped reading
    them in?

    I.e, should I be deleting the old logs myself or should the warm
    standby be managing them?
    either delete them yourself, use a cron job to delete them (something like
    find . -mtime 60 -delete) , or if you are using pg_standby look at -k (which
    specifies the number of old files to keep

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  • Erik Jones at Jan 18, 2008 at 6:31 pm

    On Jan 18, 2008, at 11:17 AM, Glyn Astill wrote:

    My server ran out of disk space because my archive directory was full
    ow write ahead logs.

    My warm standby had lost it's mounted NFS volume and thus stopped
    reading in the archives from the master.

    Would I have run out of space if the standby hadn't stopped reading
    them in?

    I.e, should I be deleting the old logs myself or should the warm
    standby be managing them?
    Depends on what you're using run your warm standby in your
    recovery.conf. pg_standby has the -k flag for NUMFILESTOKEEP. Where
    I work, we have a cron job that deletes WAL archives more than three
    days old. Admittedly, using pg_standby's -k option is probably more
    reliable.

    Erik Jones

    DBA | Emma®
    erik@myemma.com
    800.595.4401 or 615.292.5888
    615.292.0777 (fax)

    Emma helps organizations everywhere communicate & market in style.
    Visit us online at http://www.myemma.com
  • Glyn Astill at Jan 18, 2008 at 6:53 pm
    Thanks Erik,

    I'll set up a cron job to remove them for now, however I'll have a
    look at pg_standby


    --- Erik Jones wrote:
    On Jan 18, 2008, at 11:17 AM, Glyn Astill wrote:

    My server ran out of disk space because my archive directory was full
    ow write ahead logs.

    My warm standby had lost it's mounted NFS volume and thus stopped
    reading in the archives from the master.

    Would I have run out of space if the standby hadn't stopped reading
    them in?

    I.e, should I be deleting the old logs myself or should the warm
    standby be managing them?
    Depends on what you're using run your warm standby in your
    recovery.conf. pg_standby has the -k flag for NUMFILESTOKEEP.
    Where
    I work, we have a cron job that deletes WAL archives more than
    three
    days old. Admittedly, using pg_standby's -k option is probably
    more
    reliable.

    Erik Jones

    DBA | Emma®
    erik@myemma.com
    800.595.4401 or 615.292.5888
    615.292.0777 (fax)

    Emma helps organizations everywhere communicate & market in style.
    Visit us online at http://www.myemma.com




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  • Tom Lane at Jan 18, 2008 at 8:34 pm

    Glyn Astill writes:
    I'll set up a cron job to remove them for now, however I'll have a
    look at pg_standby
    Keep in mind that if you delete a log segment that's not yet been sent
    to the standby, you've hosed the standby --- you'll have to take a fresh
    base backup and reload the standby with it. This is probably okay for
    disaster recovery, but you don't want your script creating the disaster
    all by itself.

    regards, tom lane
  • Erik Jones at Jan 18, 2008 at 8:52 pm

    On Jan 18, 2008, at 2:34 PM, Tom Lane wrote:

    Glyn Astill <glynastill@yahoo.co.uk> writes:
    I'll set up a cron job to remove them for now, however I'll have a
    look at pg_standby
    Keep in mind that if you delete a log segment that's not yet been sent
    to the standby, you've hosed the standby --- you'll have to take a
    fresh
    base backup and reload the standby with it. This is probably okay for
    disaster recovery, but you don't want your script creating the
    disaster
    all by itself.
    Which is exactly why I pointed out that using pg_standby's -k switch
    was the more reliable option.

    Erik Jones

    DBA | Emma®
    erik@myemma.com
    800.595.4401 or 615.292.5888
    615.292.0777 (fax)

    Emma helps organizations everywhere communicate & market in style.
    Visit us online at http://www.myemma.com
  • David Wall at Jan 18, 2008 at 11:17 pm

    Which is exactly why I pointed out that using pg_standby's -k switch
    was the more reliable option.
    And supposedly even that switch is not needed once we can get to 8.3,
    which should be soon. Even the -k switch can be an issue since you
    don't really know how many you should keep around.

    David

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