On Sat, Mar 11, 2006 at 10:54:52AM -0800, Josh Berkus wrote:
2) Do major (> $1000) financial sponsors get to be Sponsors at
www.postgresql.org/about/Sponsors, or do we put them somewhere else? (we'll
probably need to have this argument on Advocacy as well).
Since I haven't seen this on -advocacy yet...

The only argument I can think of for seperating large donors from
corporate sponsors is that some folks might have rather different levels
of interest about each one. Having a number of corporations officially
sponsoring the project arguably carries more weight than the same number
of individual believers, even if they do have deep pockets.

It also might not make sense from a financial perspective. $1k is quite
a lot for most individuals, but it's a tiny sum for all but the smallest
companies.

But of course, my opinions might be a bit biased here... :)
--
Jim C. Nasby, Sr. Engineering Consultant jnasby@pervasive.com
Pervasive Software http://pervasive.com work: 512-231-6117
vcard: http://jim.nasby.net/pervasive.vcf cell: 512-569-9461

Search Discussions

  • Darcy Buskermolen at Mar 22, 2006 at 7:19 pm

    On Wednesday 22 March 2006 07:45, Jim C. Nasby wrote:
    On Sat, Mar 11, 2006 at 10:54:52AM -0800, Josh Berkus wrote:
    2) Do major (> $1000) financial sponsors get to be Sponsors at
    www.postgresql.org/about/Sponsors, or do we put them somewhere else?
    (we'll probably need to have this argument on Advocacy as well).
    Since I haven't seen this on -advocacy yet...

    The only argument I can think of for seperating large donors from
    corporate sponsors is that some folks might have rather different levels
    of interest about each one. Having a number of corporations officially
    sponsoring the project arguably carries more weight than the same number
    of individual believers, even if they do have deep pockets.

    It also might not make sense from a financial perspective. $1k is quite
    a lot for most individuals, but it's a tiny sum for all but the smallest
    companies.

    But of course, my opinions might be a bit biased here... :)
    Perhaps a link on the sponsors page that is "individual sponsors" and list
    those people that sponsor a significant amount. Though saying that I'm not
    sure what qualifies as a significant amount, perhaps as low as 100.00. And
    when i say Individual sponsosr I'm thinking small companies as well, Because
    as you say large sums are easy for large companies, but not so easy for small
    companies who are using PG as a core part of thier business. Perhaps
    something simular to the way that PHK listed all those people that sponsored
    him to do fbsd development.

    http://people.freebsd.org/~phk/donations.html
    http://people.freebsd.org/~phk/funding.html

    --
    Darcy Buskermolen
    Wavefire Technologies Corp.

    http://www.wavefire.com
    ph: 250.717.0200
    fx: 250.763.1759
  • Elein at Mar 22, 2006 at 7:40 pm

    On Wed, Mar 22, 2006 at 11:20:20AM -0800, Darcy Buskermolen wrote:
    On Wednesday 22 March 2006 07:45, Jim C. Nasby wrote:
    On Sat, Mar 11, 2006 at 10:54:52AM -0800, Josh Berkus wrote:
    2) Do major (> $1000) financial sponsors get to be Sponsors at
    www.postgresql.org/about/Sponsors, or do we put them somewhere else?
    (we'll probably need to have this argument on Advocacy as well).
    Since I haven't seen this on -advocacy yet...

    The only argument I can think of for seperating large donors from
    corporate sponsors is that some folks might have rather different levels
    of interest about each one. Having a number of corporations officially
    sponsoring the project arguably carries more weight than the same number
    of individual believers, even if they do have deep pockets.

    It also might not make sense from a financial perspective. $1k is quite
    a lot for most individuals, but it's a tiny sum for all but the smallest
    companies.

    But of course, my opinions might be a bit biased here... :)
    Perhaps a link on the sponsors page that is "individual sponsors" and list
    those people that sponsor a significant amount. Though saying that I'm not
    sure what qualifies as a significant amount, perhaps as low as 100.00. And
    when i say Individual sponsosr I'm thinking small companies as well, Because
    as you say large sums are easy for large companies, but not so easy for small
    companies who are using PG as a core part of thier business. Perhaps
    something simular to the way that PHK listed all those people that sponsored
    him to do fbsd development.

    http://people.freebsd.org/~phk/donations.html
    http://people.freebsd.org/~phk/funding.html
    As one of the small businesses that has contributed and plans to contribute
    more (the postgres pin business :) I would appreciate my small contribution
    recognized. It is actually a fair amount of work and in very small businesses
    like mine both money and bandwidth is at a premium.

    I don't like the separation of big'uns and little'uns. We all do what we
    can.

    --elein

    --------------------------------------------------------------
    elein@varlena.com Varlena, LLC www.varlena.com
    (510)655-2584(o) (510)543-6079(c)

    PostgreSQL Consulting, Support & Training

    PostgreSQL General Bits http://www.varlena.com/GeneralBits/
    --------------------------------------------------------------
    I have always depended on the [QA] of strangers.

    --
    Darcy Buskermolen
    Wavefire Technologies Corp.

    http://www.wavefire.com
    ph: 250.717.0200
    fx: 250.763.1759

    ---------------------------(end of broadcast)---------------------------
    TIP 2: Don't 'kill -9' the postmaster
  • Josh Berkus at Mar 22, 2006 at 7:47 pm
    Jim,

    Well, this is my general idea. We'd divide the sponsors page into:

    Code Contributors
    current developer sponsors here

    Hosting Sponsors
    hub, ehpg, cmd, etc.

    Financial Sponsors
    Major Sponsors
    $10,000+ annual corporate gifts
    Sponsors
    other corporate gifts, $1000-$10,000
    plus in-kind support
    Individuals (link to page)

    However, the "ad-hoc fundraising group" has yet to discuss actual donor
    levels. Plus, "Financial Sponsors" *must* include donors to JPUG,
    PostgresqlFR and FFIV Germany as well as PostgreSQL at SPI.

    I've thought about some relativist approaches but they don't really seem
    appropriate for a donor credits page -- all they would do is result in the
    big companies giving less, which is not what we want.

    Oh, one more note: I'd like to phase out the banner ads by using sponsor
    listings instead. No other major OSS project I know of uses banners ads
    on their site; it's time to shut them down.

    --
    --Josh

    Josh Berkus
    Aglio Database Solutions
    San Francisco
  • Rajesh Sharma at Mar 23, 2006 at 4:33 am
    How about even having, sort of "Ambassadors" of Postgresql for specific
    country/region/state/city.
    Actively participating people/person to whom locallly others can contact,
    ofcourse the pug prevails.

    --Rajesh.
    On 3/22/06, Josh Berkus wrote:

    Jim,

    Well, this is my general idea. We'd divide the sponsors page into:

    Code Contributors
    current developer sponsors here

    Hosting Sponsors
    hub, ehpg, cmd, etc.

    Financial Sponsors
    Major Sponsors
    $10,000+ annual corporate gifts
    Sponsors
    other corporate gifts, $1000-$10,000
    plus in-kind support
    Individuals (link to page)

    However, the "ad-hoc fundraising group" has yet to discuss actual donor
    levels. Plus, "Financial Sponsors" *must* include donors to JPUG,
    PostgresqlFR and FFIV Germany as well as PostgreSQL at SPI.

    I've thought about some relativist approaches but they don't really seem
    appropriate for a donor credits page -- all they would do is result in the
    big companies giving less, which is not what we want.

    Oh, one more note: I'd like to phase out the banner ads by using sponsor
    listings instead. No other major OSS project I know of uses banners ads
    on their site; it's time to shut them down.

    --
    --Josh

    Josh Berkus
    Aglio Database Solutions
    San Francisco

    ---------------------------(end of broadcast)---------------------------
    TIP 6: explain analyze is your friend
  • Chris Browne at Mar 22, 2006 at 9:04 pm

    "Jim C. Nasby" writes:
    It also might not make sense from a financial perspective. $1k is
    quite a lot for most individuals, but it's a tiny sum for all but
    the smallest companies.
    I suspect it's a more significant thing, in fact, if a project
    attracts contributions from 50 individuals that add to $1000 (that's a
    mere $20 apiece) than if it attracts $10K from a corporate donor.

    I'd expect getting 50 people to take the (pretty nominal) action to be
    more difficult than to get one person to sign off on $10K.

    If a project needs $10K, the latter is obviously necessary;
    demonstrating the "grass roots support" of the first $1K would be
    quite compelling to the folks with bigger purse strings...
    --
    output = ("cbbrowne" "@" "ntlug.org")
    http://www.ntlug.org/~cbbrowne/internet.html
    Change is inevitable, except from a vending machine.
  • Jim C. Nasby at Mar 23, 2006 at 5:14 pm

    On Wed, Mar 22, 2006 at 03:07:23PM -0500, Chris Browne wrote:
    jnasby@pervasive.com ("Jim C. Nasby") writes:
    It also might not make sense from a financial perspective. $1k is
    quite a lot for most individuals, but it's a tiny sum for all but
    the smallest companies.
    I suspect it's a more significant thing, in fact, if a project
    attracts contributions from 50 individuals that add to $1000 (that's a
    mere $20 apiece) than if it attracts $10K from a corporate donor.
    I don't know about that; people tend to get a 'warm-fuzzy' when they
    find out that major corporations are using/promoting/contributing to
    PostgreSQL.
    --
    Jim C. Nasby, Sr. Engineering Consultant jnasby@pervasive.com
    Pervasive Software http://pervasive.com work: 512-231-6117
    vcard: http://jim.nasby.net/pervasive.vcf cell: 512-569-9461
  • Joshua D. Drake at Mar 23, 2006 at 5:37 pm

    Jim C. Nasby wrote:
    On Wed, Mar 22, 2006 at 03:07:23PM -0500, Chris Browne wrote:
    jnasby@pervasive.com ("Jim C. Nasby") writes:
    It also might not make sense from a financial perspective. $1k is
    quite a lot for most individuals, but it's a tiny sum for all but
    the smallest companies.
    I suspect it's a more significant thing, in fact, if a project
    attracts contributions from 50 individuals that add to $1000 (that's a
    mere $20 apiece) than if it attracts $10K from a corporate donor.
    I don't know about that; people tend to get a 'warm-fuzzy' when they
    find out that major corporations are using/promoting/contributing to
    PostgreSQL.

    My experience is that in order to get "Major Sponsors" they have to be
    listed as such. Companies don't give to OSS projects for the heck of it.
    They want something in return.

    That being said, there is a ton of "donations" that happen that make
    people major sponsors.

    Every member of core is a major sponsor.

    Red Hat is a major sponsor because they pay Tom, but Tom is a major
    sponsor because I know he spends well more then 40 hours a week on this
    project.

    As sponsors page that will delineate between size of monetary
    contribution is going to cause problems with those who donate a great
    deal of in-kind contributions.

    Elein is a perfect example. If she goes to 3 shows how much is that
    worth? My day rate is 2500.00 (if I am out of towm) plus expenses....

    Frankly I would say:

    Two pages, one for businesses, on for individuals. To qualify to be
    on the page you have to donate more then "X" in-kind + dollars.

    The pages are alphabetical, no graphics.

    Joshua D. Drake
  • Mike Ellsworth at Mar 23, 2006 at 6:17 pm

    Joshua D. Drake wrote:

    Jim C. Nasby wrote:
    On Wed, Mar 22, 2006 at 03:07:23PM -0500, Chris Browne wrote:

    jnasby@pervasive.com ("Jim C. Nasby") writes:
    It also might not make sense from a financial perspective. $1k is
    quite a lot for most individuals, but it's a tiny sum for all but
    the smallest companies.
    I suspect it's a more significant thing, in fact, if a project
    attracts contributions from 50 individuals that add to $1000 (that's a
    mere $20 apiece) than if it attracts $10K from a corporate donor.

    I don't know about that; people tend to get a 'warm-fuzzy' when they
    find out that major corporations are using/promoting/contributing to
    PostgreSQL.
    ..........

    Elein is a perfect example. If she goes to 3 shows how much is that
    worth? My day rate is 2500.00 (if I am out of towm) plus expenses....

    Frankly I would say:

    Two pages, one for businesses, on for individuals. To qualify to be
    on the page you have to donate more then "X" in-kind + dollars.

    The pages are alphabetical, no graphics.

    Joshua D. Drake
    Without comment or opinion on the eventual approach, "cut-off $" or
    monetization of non-cash contributions, a person/entity should receive a
    brief "Thank you!" directly from PostgreSQL.org - regardless of the
    size of the $$ contribution. As it is now, if you go the SPI route, you
    get a confirm from SPI but NADA from PG.

    Not everyone needs or wants to have their names in lights, but I am
    reasonably sure that anyone donating via SPI would at least like to know
    that PG received the funds and that the contribution, however minute,
    was received and appreciated. There may be a timing issue on the funds
    transfer, but somehow/someway/sometime, a Thank You needs to be triggered.

    $10 may be peanuts to some, but not everywhere in the world. Elephants
    like peanuts. Eat 'em right up.
  • Joshua D. Drake at Mar 23, 2006 at 6:19 pm

    get a confirm from SPI but NADA from PG.
    Not everyone needs or wants to have their names in lights, but I am
    reasonably sure that anyone donating via SPI would at least like to know
    that PG received the funds and that the contribution, however minute,
    was received and appreciated. There may be a timing issue on the funds
    transfer, but somehow/someway/sometime, a Thank You needs to be triggered.
    $10 may be peanuts to some, but not everywhere in the world. Elephants
    like peanuts. Eat 'em right up.
    Absolutely!

    Joshua D. Drake



    ---------------------------(end of broadcast)---------------------------
    TIP 2: Don't 'kill -9' the postmaster
  • Josh Berkus at Mar 23, 2006 at 7:18 pm
    Mike,
    Without comment or opinion on the eventual approach, "cut-off $" or
    monetization of non-cash contributions, a person/entity should receive a
    brief "Thank you!" directly from PostgreSQL.org - regardless of the
    size of the $$ contribution. As it is now, if you go the SPI route, you
    get a confirm from SPI but NADA from PG.
    This is a technical problem that hopefully we'll have worked out soon. I'm
    supposed to get a list of donors on a monthly or bi-monthly basis so that
    I can send them thank-you e-mails. Unfortunately, there seems to be some
    problem with this process that we haven't figured out yet.

    --
    --Josh

    Josh Berkus
    Aglio Database Solutions
    San Francisco
  • Mike Ellsworth at Mar 23, 2006 at 7:42 pm
    This will be a good. Black holes can provoke a sense of
    wonderment, followed immediately by a facial tic. :-)

    Josh Berkus wrote:
    Mike,


    Without comment or opinion on the eventual approach, "cut-off $" or
    monetization of non-cash contributions, a person/entity should receive a
    brief "Thank you!" directly from PostgreSQL.org - regardless of the
    size of the $$ contribution. As it is now, if you go the SPI route, you
    get a confirm from SPI but NADA from PG.
    This is a technical problem that hopefully we'll have worked out soon. I'm
    supposed to get a list of donors on a monthly or bi-monthly basis so that
    I can send them thank-you e-mails. Unfortunately, there seems to be some
    problem with this process that we haven't figured out yet.

  • Alvaro Herrera at Mar 23, 2006 at 7:48 pm

    Mike Ellsworth wrote:
    This will be a good. Black holes can provoke a sense of
    wonderment, followed immediately by a facial tic. :-)
    Hmm ... that seems radically different from my experience observing the
    interactions between black holes and spaceships ... in movies, that is.

    --
    Alvaro Herrera http://www.CommandPrompt.com/
    PostgreSQL Replication, Consulting, Custom Development, 24x7 support
  • Jim Nasby at Mar 24, 2006 at 9:34 am

    On Mar 23, 2006, at 7:16 PM, Mike Ellsworth wrote:
    $10 may be peanuts to some, but not everywhere in the world.
    Elephants like peanuts. Eat 'em right up.
    Heh, that reminds me, for those that haven't seen it, we have a new
    advertising campaign/motto/whateveryouwanttocallit; "Massive database
    power... for peanuts!"
    --
    Jim C. Nasby, Sr. Engineering Consultant jnasby@pervasive.com
    Pervasive Software http://pervasive.com work: 512-231-6117
    vcard: http://jim.nasby.net/pervasive.vcf cell: 512-569-9461
  • Robert Treat at Mar 23, 2006 at 6:38 pm

    On Thu, 2006-03-23 at 12:37, Joshua D. Drake wrote:
    As sponsors page that will delineate between size of monetary
    contribution is going to cause problems with those who donate a great
    deal of in-kind contributions.

    Elein is a perfect example. If she goes to 3 shows how much is that
    worth? My day rate is 2500.00 (if I am out of towm) plus expenses....
    ISTM if you are distributing flyers/business cards with your name over
    them, your already getting a return on your time investment at a given
    show, especially in cases like oscon where the booth is provided to the
    project for free. If you are paying to get postgresql entry into the
    conference (like was recently discussed in the dubai thread) then that
    might be a little different, but I think we need some kind of
    delineation between companies who pay developer salaries, people who
    staff booths where they get to advertise their wares, and people who
    send in a check (Well, that assumes the goal isn't just to compile the
    largest list of sponsors we can, but actually give real recognition to
    those who continually sponsor this project and the folks who might give
    a one time donation).


    Robert Treat
    --
    Build A Brighter Lamp :: Linux Apache {middleware} PostgreSQL
  • Elein at Mar 23, 2006 at 7:25 pm

    On Thu, Mar 23, 2006 at 01:34:46PM -0500, Robert Treat wrote:
    On Thu, 2006-03-23 at 12:37, Joshua D. Drake wrote:
    As sponsors page that will delineate between size of monetary
    contribution is going to cause problems with those who donate a great
    deal of in-kind contributions.

    Elein is a perfect example. If she goes to 3 shows how much is that
    worth? My day rate is 2500.00 (if I am out of towm) plus expenses....
    ISTM if you are distributing flyers/business cards with your name over
    them, your already getting a return on your time investment at a given
    show, especially in cases like oscon where the booth is provided to the
    project for free. If you are paying to get postgresql entry into the
    conference (like was recently discussed in the dubai thread) then that
    might be a little different, but I think we need some kind of
    delineation between companies who pay developer salaries, people who
    staff booths where they get to advertise their wares, and people who
    send in a check (Well, that assumes the goal isn't just to compile the
    largest list of sponsors we can, but actually give real recognition to
    those who continually sponsor this project and the folks who might give
    a one time donation).
    If all I did was to staff a booth at conferences and hand out cards, then you
    might have a point. However, this is not the case for me. I created
    PostgreSQL flyers (not varlena flyers). I organize the pin effort. I help organize
    the booth. I work with the oscon committee. I give talks at conferences and user
    groups which require preparation. I write a semi-weekly column with a huge archive.
    I do get a little marketing visibility in there but believe me I work and pay for
    it dearly since most of what I do goes to educating the postgresql user community for free.

    This is just me. Certain other people also do not get paid for their work
    and time above and beyond self-interest. We consider it our contribution
    back to the community. This, I believe, is how and why open source works.

    Why does it bother you to acknowledge work and time of others? (That is a
    rhetorical question.)

    --elein
    --------------------------------------------------------------
    elein@varlena.com Varlena, LLC www.varlena.com
    PostgreSQL Consulting, Support & Training
    PostgreSQL General Bits http://www.varlena.com/GeneralBits/
    --------------------------------------------------------------
    I have always depended on the [QA] of strangers.

    Robert Treat
    --
    Build A Brighter Lamp :: Linux Apache {middleware} PostgreSQL


    ---------------------------(end of broadcast)---------------------------
    TIP 2: Don't 'kill -9' the postmaster
  • Josh Berkus at Mar 23, 2006 at 10:25 pm
    Folks,

    This is why I said "It's not fully discussed ..." because it's not.
    In-kind gifts are particularly a big issue that will take some working
    out.

    --
    --Josh

    Josh Berkus
    Aglio Database Solutions
    San Francisco
  • Robert Treat at Mar 23, 2006 at 10:35 pm

    On Thursday 23 March 2006 14:20, elein wrote:
    On Thu, Mar 23, 2006 at 01:34:46PM -0500, Robert Treat wrote:
    On Thu, 2006-03-23 at 12:37, Joshua D. Drake wrote:
    As sponsors page that will delineate between size of monetary
    contribution is going to cause problems with those who donate a great
    deal of in-kind contributions.

    Elein is a perfect example. If she goes to 3 shows how much is that
    worth? My day rate is 2500.00 (if I am out of towm) plus expenses....
    ISTM if you are distributing flyers/business cards with your name over
    them, your already getting a return on your time investment at a given
    show, especially in cases like oscon where the booth is provided to the
    project for free. If you are paying to get postgresql entry into the
    conference (like was recently discussed in the dubai thread) then that
    might be a little different, but I think we need some kind of
    delineation between companies who pay developer salaries, people who
    staff booths where they get to advertise their wares, and people who
    send in a check (Well, that assumes the goal isn't just to compile the
    largest list of sponsors we can, but actually give real recognition to
    those who continually sponsor this project and the folks who might give
    a one time donation).
    If all I did was to staff a booth at conferences and hand out cards, then
    you might have a point. However, this is not the case for me.
    I guess I have to point out that my above statement was not directed at you
    specifically? We get a lot of companies that staff booths at a lot of shows.
    Honestly I am glad that they do, from what I have seen they represent the
    community in a fantastic way. But do we have to turn a blind eye to the fact
    that some of these people are their for commercial purposes, and they they
    are served well by that exposure, and that they are not getting raw deal out
    of it?
    I created
    PostgreSQL flyers (not varlena flyers). I organize the pin effort. I help
    organize the booth. I work with the oscon committee. I give talks at
    conferences and user groups which require preparation. I write a
    semi-weekly column with a huge archive. I do get a little marketing
    visibility in there but believe me I work and pay for it dearly since most
    of what I do goes to educating the postgresql user community for free.
    You "pay for it dearly"? If your activities are hurting your business that
    much, by all means cut back on them.
    This is just me. Certain other people also do not get paid for their work
    and time above and beyond self-interest. We consider it our contribution
    back to the community. This, I believe, is how and why open source works.
    Berkus has a nice way of laying out how all open source contributions are done
    in some form of self-interests. I tend to agree with it. Some people do open
    source as a desire to say thanks, some do it as a way to promote certain
    ideals, and some do it expecting to get paid for it. I tend to care more
    just that people contribute than as to exactly why they contribute, but I
    don't feel the need to obfuscate these motivations either; if we want to
    recognize specific types of contributions (like cash donations) then let's do
    that. If people feel that this would discriminate too much against people who
    have not contributed in that specific way, then let's make a "this person has
    probably had some type of involvement with the postgresql project, or at
    least has struggled through pronouncing the project name" list and we can
    start signing people up for that I'm good either way... as Justin used to
    post in his sig:

    "My grandfather once told me that there are two kinds of people: those
    who work and those who take the credit. He told me to try to be in the
    first group; there was less competition there."
    - Indira Gandhi

    But let's be honest with ourselves about what we're doing.
    Why does it bother you to acknowledge work and time of others? (That is a
    rhetorical question.)
    Really? It sounds more like an insult. And an ironic one at that given I have
    been the primary driver of getting people added to the recognized developers
    and corporations lists for the last couple of releases.

    --
    Robert Treat
    Build A Brighter LAMP: Linux Apache {middleware} PostgreSQL
  • Devrim GÃNDÃZ at Mar 23, 2006 at 10:52 pm
    Hi,
    On Thu, 2006-03-23 at 17:35 -0500, Robert Treat wrote:
    as Justin used to post in his sig:
    Is this Justin Clift? Anyone knows whether he is around or not?

    He is one who pushed me into -www team 5 years ago...
    --
    The PostgreSQL Company - Command Prompt, Inc. 1.503.667.4564
    PostgreSQL Replication, Consulting, Custom Development, 24x7 support
    Managed Services, Shared and Dedicated Hosting
    Co-Authors: PL/php, plPerlNG - http://www.commandprompt.com/
  • Josh Berkus at Mar 23, 2006 at 10:53 pm
    Devrim,
    Is this Justin Clift? Anyone knows whether he is around or not?

    He is one who pushed me into -www team 5 years ago...
    He's still around. He and I swapped places; he became heavily involved in
    OpenOffice.org and I dropped OOo for Postgres.

    --
    --Josh

    Josh Berkus
    Aglio Database Solutions
    San Francisco
  • Devrim GÃNDÃZ at Mar 23, 2006 at 10:59 pm
    Hi,
    On Thu, 2006-03-23 at 14:52 -0800, Josh Berkus wrote:
    Is this Justin Clift? Anyone knows whether he is around or not?

    He is one who pushed me into -www team 5 years ago...
    He's still around. He and I swapped places; he became heavily
    involved in
    OpenOffice.org and I dropped OOo for Postgres.
    Thanks for the update. Let me e-mail him (if his previous e-mail still
    works...)

    Regards,
    --
    The PostgreSQL Company - Command Prompt, Inc. 1.503.667.4564
    PostgreSQL Replication, Consulting, Custom Development, 24x7 support
    Managed Services, Shared and Dedicated Hosting
    Co-Authors: PL/php, plPerlNG - http://www.commandprompt.com/

Related Discussions

Discussion Navigation
viewthread | post
Discussion Overview
grouppgsql-advocacy @
categoriespostgresql
postedMar 22, '06 at 3:45p
activeMar 24, '06 at 9:34a
posts21
users11
websitepostgresql.org
irc#postgresql

People

Translate

site design / logo © 2022 Grokbase