FAQ
Author: Darren_Duncan
Date: 2009-07-05 07:25:11 +0200 (Sun, 05 Jul 2009)
New Revision: 27415

Modified:
docs/Perl6/Spec/S02-bits.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S03-operators.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S04-control.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S05-regex.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S06-routines.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S07-iterators.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S09-data.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S10-packages.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S11-modules.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S12-objects.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S14-roles-and-parametric-types.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S16-io.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S17-concurrency.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S19-commandline.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S21-calling-foreign-code.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S22-package-format.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S26-documentation.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S28-special-names.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S29-functions.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S31-pragmatic-modules.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Abstraction.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Basics.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Callable.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Containers.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Exception.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/IO.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Numeric.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Rules.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Str.pod
docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Temporal.pod
Log:
P6 Synopsis : ws changes - remove trailing spaces

Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S02-bits.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S02-bits.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S02-bits.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -377,7 +377,7 @@

$x\ # comment
# inside unspace
- ++ # (but without the optional postfix dot)
+ ++ # (but without the optional postfix dot)

$x\#『 comment
more comment
@@ -416,7 +416,7 @@

but never as

- foo.method
+ foo.method

Use some variant of

@@ -1185,7 +1185,7 @@

actually means:

- my Hash:of(Array:of(Recipe)) %book;
+ my Hash:of(Array:of(Recipe)) %book;

Because the actual variable can be hard to find when complex types are
specified, there is a postfix form as well:
@@ -1601,7 +1601,7 @@

All prefix sigil operators accept one positional argument, evaluated in
item context as a rvalue. They can interpolate in strings if called with
-parentheses. The special syntax form C<$()> translates into C<$( $.ast // Str($/) )>
+parentheses. The special syntax form C<$()> translates into C<$( $.ast // Str($/) )>
to operate on the current match object; similarly C<@()> and C<%()> can
extract positional and named submatches.

@@ -1761,7 +1761,7 @@
Many of the special variables of Perl 5 are going away. Those that
apply to some object such as a filehandle will instead be attributes
of the appropriate object. Those that are truly global will have
-global alphabetic names, such as C<$*PID> or C<@*ARGS>.
+global alphabetic names, such as C<$*PID> or C<@*ARGS>.

=item *


Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S03-operators.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S03-operators.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S03-operators.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -481,7 +481,7 @@
0..9 # ASCII
٠..٩ # Arabic-Indic
०..९ # Devangari
- ০..৯ # Bengali
+ ০..৯ # Bengali
੦..੯ # Gurmukhi
૦..૯ # Gujarati
୦..୯ # Oriya

Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S04-control.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S04-control.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S04-control.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -150,7 +150,7 @@

my $x = [
sub { 3 }, # this comma is not optional
- sub { 3 } # the statement won't terminate here
+ sub { 3 } # the statement won't terminate here
];

However, a hash composer may never occur at the end of a line. If the
@@ -521,7 +521,7 @@
loop (which is another reason you can't put a statement
modifier on it; use C<repeat> for a test-at-the-end loop).

-For any statement, prefixing with a C<do> allows you to
+For any statement, prefixing with a C<do> allows you to
return the value of that statement and use it in an expression:

$x = do if $a { $b } else { $c };
@@ -573,7 +573,7 @@
an explicit call, C<CALLER::> doesn't count it as a routine boundary.

If you wish to return a closure from a function, you must use an
-explicit prefix such as C<return> or C<sub> or C<< -> >>.
+explicit prefix such as C<return> or C<sub> or C<< -> >>.

sub f1
{
@@ -1116,7 +1116,7 @@
START {...}* on first ever execution, once per closure clone

ENTER {...}* at every block entry time, repeats on loop blocks.
- LEAVE {...} at every block exit time
+ LEAVE {...} at every block exit time
KEEP {...} at every successful block exit, part of LEAVE queue
UNDO {...} at every unsuccessful block exit, part of LEAVE queue


Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S05-regex.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S05-regex.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S05-regex.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -25,7 +25,7 @@
becoming a technical term with a precise meaning of: "something you do
pattern matching with, kinda like a regular expression". On the other
hand, one of the purposes of the redesign is to make portions of
-our patterns more amenable to analysis under traditional regular
+our patterns more amenable to analysis under traditional regular
expression and parser semantics, and that involves making careful
distinctions between which parts of our patterns and grammars are
to be treated as declarative, and which parts as procedural.
@@ -1108,12 +1108,12 @@

< adam & eve > # equivalent to [ 'adam' | '&' | 'eve' ]

-Note that the space before the ending > is optional and therefore
+Note that the space before the ending > is optional and therefore
< adam & eve> would be acceptable.

=item *

-A leading alphabetic character means it's a capturing grammatical
+A leading alphabetic character means it's a capturing grammatical
assertion (i.e. a subrule or a named character class - see below):

/ <sign>? <mantissa> <exponent>? /
@@ -3263,7 +3263,7 @@
Note, however, that a set of quantified I<non-capturing> brackets always
returns a single C<Match> object which contains only the complete
substring that was matched by the full set of repetitions of the
-brackets (as described in L<Named scalar aliases applied to
+brackets (as described in L<Named scalar aliases applied to
non-capturing brackets>). For example:

"coffee fifo fumble" ~~ m/ $<effs>=[f <-[f]> ** 1..2 \s*]+ /;

Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S06-routines.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S06-routines.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S06-routines.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -124,7 +124,7 @@

sub foo {...}

-This is equivalent to
+This is equivalent to

sub foo (*@_, *%_) {...}

@@ -827,7 +827,7 @@
@fromtwo = tail(1..Inf); # @fromtwo contains a lazy [2..Inf]

You can't bind to the name of a slurpy parameter: the name is just there
-so you can refer to it within the body.
+so you can refer to it within the body.

sub foo(*%flag, *@data) {...}

@@ -1322,7 +1322,7 @@

sub matchedset (Dog ::T, T) {...}

-if we're not interested in C<$fido> or C<$spot>. Or just
+if we're not interested in C<$fido> or C<$spot>. Or just

sub matchedset (::T, T) {...}

@@ -1538,7 +1538,7 @@

=head1 Properties and traits

-Compile-time properties are called "traits". The
+Compile-time properties are called "traits". The
C<is I<NAME> (I<DATA>)> syntax defines traits on containers and
subroutines, as part of their declaration:

@@ -1576,7 +1576,7 @@
is :Foo[...] # definitely a pair with a list
is Foo[...] # depends on whether Foo is predeclared as type

-=over
+=over

=item C<is signature>

@@ -1708,7 +1708,7 @@
postfix:<++>
postfix_prefix_meta_operator:{'»'}
prefix:<++>
- prefix_circumfix_meta_operator:{'[',']'}
+ prefix_circumfix_meta_operator:{'[',']'}
prefix_postfix_meta_operator:{'«'}
q_backslash:<\\>
qq_backslash:<n>
@@ -1857,7 +1857,7 @@

The following traits can be applied to many types of parameters.

-=over
+=over

=item C<is readonly>

@@ -1954,7 +1954,7 @@
were the argument to a C<return> list operator (with whitespace):

sub f { :x<1> } # named-argument binding (if caller uses |)
- sub f { (:x<1>) } # always just one positional Pair object
+ sub f { (:x<1>) } # always just one positional Pair object

On the caller's end, the C<Capture> is interpolated into any new argument list
much like an array would be, that is, as an item in item context, and as a
@@ -2244,7 +2244,7 @@
executed.

The default C<.TEMP> method for variables simply creates
-a closure that assigns the variable's pre-C<temp> value
+a closure that assigns the variable's pre-C<temp> value
back to the variable.

New kinds of temporization can be created by writing storage classes with
@@ -2254,7 +2254,7 @@
method TEMP {
print "Replacing $.WHICH() at {caller.location}\n";
my $restorer = $.SUPER::TEMP();
- return {
+ return {
print "Restoring $.WHICH() at {caller.location}\n";
$restorer();
};
@@ -2327,7 +2327,7 @@
to a C<Routine> works like a container, changing the contained C<do>
property but not the container itself.

-The call to C<.wrap> returns a unique handle that has a C<restore> method
+The call to C<.wrap> returns a unique handle that has a C<restore> method
that will undo the wrapping:

$handle.restore;
@@ -2608,7 +2608,7 @@

Quasiquotes default to hygienic lexical scoping, just like closures.
The visibility of lexical variables is limited to the quasi expression
-by default. A variable declaration can be made externally visible using
+by default. A variable declaration can be made externally visible using
the C<COMPILING::> pseudo-package. Individual variables can be made visible,
or all top-level variable declarations can be exposed using the
C<quasi :COMPILING> form.
@@ -2619,7 +2619,7 @@
quasi { my $COMPILING::new_variable; my $private_var; ... }
quasi :COMPILING { my $new_variable; { my $private_var; ... } }

-(Note that C<:COMPILING> has additional effects described in L</Macros>.)
+(Note that C<:COMPILING> has additional effects described in L</Macros>.)

=head1 Other matters

@@ -2628,7 +2628,7 @@

C<{...}> is always a block. However, if it is completely empty or
consists of a single list, the first element of which is either a hash
-or a pair, it is executed immediately to compose a C<Hash> object.
+or a pair, it is executed immediately to compose a C<Hash> object.

The standard C<pair> list operator is equivalent to:


Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S07-iterators.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S07-iterators.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S07-iterators.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -21,12 +21,12 @@
As we all know, one of the primary virtues of the Perl programmer is
laziness. This is also one of the virtues of Perl itself. However,
Perl 6 knows better than to succumb to false laziness, and so is eager
-sometimes, and lazy others.
+sometimes, and lazy others.

One thing that Perl understands is the difference between Laziness and
-Eagerness. When something is Lazy, it says "just give me what you've
-got; I'll get the rest later", whereas when it's eager, it says "More!
-More! Give me everything you can get!".
+Eagerness. When something is Lazy, it says "just give me what you've
+got; I'll get the rest later", whereas when it's eager, it says "More!
+More! Give me everything you can get!".

Perl 6 defines 4 levels of laziness:

@@ -84,7 +84,7 @@

my @a = grep { ... }, 1, 2, 3, 4;

-will be eagerly evaluated.
+will be eagerly evaluated.

=item Feed operators: my @a <== @something;

@@ -129,7 +129,7 @@

=item Data structure (list, tree, table, etc)

-=item Feed (map, grep, etc)
+=item Feed (map, grep, etc)

=item Stream (mostly for IO)

@@ -154,7 +154,7 @@
returned in each iteration is visible if this iterator is being used
to build a slice. While building a List, the items will be flattened.

-When it runs out of items, it will return C<Nil>.
+When it runs out of items, it will return C<Nil>.

=head1 The Iterator::PushBack Role

@@ -189,7 +189,7 @@

=head1 Auxiliary Implementations

-Perl's built-ins require that a number of auxiliary types implement
+Perl's built-ins require that a number of auxiliary types implement
Iterators. These are available for general use, and are instantiated
by ending a feed at a scalar, array, or sliced array.

@@ -225,11 +225,11 @@

my @it <== 1..2000;

-The generic lazy list consumes the feed on demand. As the elements of
+The generic lazy list consumes the feed on demand. As the elements of
the list are accessed, values that were in each subsequently returned
-C<Capture> are placed at the end of the C<Positional>. If a C<Capture>
-with more than one value is returned, each value is stored at its own
-index. Empty C<Capture>s have no effect, and so the information that
+C<Capture> are placed at the end of the C<Positional>. If a C<Capture>
+with more than one value is returned, each value is stored at its own
+index. Empty C<Capture>s have no effect, and so the information that
they ever existed at all is lost.

You can later do things like:
@@ -244,8 +244,8 @@

shift(@it);

-Reading and writing indices in a generic lazy list iterator will
-force consumption and caching of values for all indices up to and
+Reading and writing indices in a generic lazy list iterator will
+force consumption and caching of values for all indices up to and
including the accessed one.

@it[4] = 2; # @it[0..3] are cached now, @it[4] was consumed/destroyed
@@ -255,18 +255,18 @@

@it.unshift(<a b c>); # works as expected

-Trying to find the number of elements in any way may force
+Trying to find the number of elements in any way may force
eager consumption of the remainder of the values in the iterator,
and trying to access the end of the list certainly will.

@it.pop; # Eagerness happens. Maybe bad things, too.

-...but you had better be very sure that the list is finite. Attempts to
-fiddle with the end of an infinite list may result in the interpreter
-raising quite the exception, in the luckiest cases it may just deliver an
-C<Inf>, but in some cases you may find yourself spending a very, very
-long time doing laps around the yard. The exact behavior may be
-implementation specific.
+...but you had better be very sure that the list is finite. Attempts to
+fiddle with the end of an infinite list may result in the interpreter
+raising quite the exception, in the luckiest cases it may just deliver an
+C<Inf>, but in some cases you may find yourself spending a very, very
+long time doing laps around the yard. The exact behavior may be
+implementation specific.

So don't do that.

@@ -280,28 +280,28 @@

(XXX TODO: effect of type constraints/shape of @it? )

-(XXX TODO:
+(XXX TODO:

- my @a = (1,2); @a <<== ... promotes an occupied Positional to
+ my @a = (1,2); @a <<== ... promotes an occupied Positional to
iterator, right? Should probably be explicitly mentioned.
)


=head2 Generic Lazy Slice

-The generic lazy slice consumes the C<Capture>s from an iterator but
-stores the results as a bi-dimensional list, where the first dimension
-corresponds to an iteration, and the second contains the values in
-the C<Capture> returned for that iteration. Empty C<Capture>s are
+The generic lazy slice consumes the C<Capture>s from an iterator but
+stores the results as a bi-dimensional list, where the first dimension
+corresponds to an iteration, and the second contains the values in
+the C<Capture> returned for that iteration. Empty C<Capture>s are
stored just like the rest of the iterations.

To obtain a generic lazy slice, end a feed in a sliced C<Positional>.

my @@it <== map { ... }, 1,2,3;

-(XXX TODO:
+(XXX TODO:

- @@it <== (1,mysub(),2;1,2,3);
+ @@it <== (1,mysub(),2;1,2,3);
@@it[0];
@@it[0;1];

@@ -311,16 +311,16 @@
=head1 Coroutines

Perl6 does not have a formally defined sub-style coroutine. Doubtless
-there will be external modules to do so in different flavors. Such a
-construct, where many calls made to the name of a sub with different
-parameters, expecting to reach the same sub every time, is not really
-compatible with multi-method-dispatch. While it may suit some
-programming styles which only use a subset of the Perl6 language, it
+there will be external modules to do so in different flavors. Such a
+construct, where many calls made to the name of a sub with different
+parameters, expecting to reach the same sub every time, is not really
+compatible with multi-method-dispatch. While it may suit some
+programming styles which only use a subset of the Perl6 language, it
cannot be made generally applicable across the Perl6 feature set.

This is not to say you cannot do coroutines in Perl6. In fact, the
gather/take construct is a simple coroutine. But if you want to pass
-values back and forth Lua-style, you have to use a suplimentary
+values back and forth Lua-style, you have to use a suplimentary
object:

sub my_coro (*@slurp) {
@@ -347,9 +347,9 @@
say "Third result: " ~ get $it;

...if you want to pass multiple parameters on each call, you can
-use a slice slurpy instead, to pass a C<Capture>.
+use a slice slurpy instead, to pass a C<Capture>.

-The iterator and array can of course be bundled up to give a more
+The iterator and array can of course be bundled up to give a more
natural feel:

class my_sub2coro {

Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S09-data.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S09-data.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S09-data.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -168,7 +168,7 @@
A basic array declaration like:

my @array;
-
+
declares a one-dimensional array of indeterminate length. Such arrays
are autoextending. For many purposes, though, it's useful to define
array types of a particular size and shape that, instead of
@@ -317,7 +317,7 @@
The shape may be supplied entirely by the object at run-time:

my num @nums = Array of num.new(:shape(3;3;3));
- my num @nums .=new():shape(3;3;3); # same thing
+ my num @nums .=new():shape(3;3;3); # same thing

A multidimensional array is indexed by a semicolon list, which is really
a list of feeds in disguise. Each sublist is a slice/feed of one
@@ -615,9 +615,9 @@
=head1 Negative and differential subscripts

The "whatever star" behaves differently than described above when
-it is treated as a number inside a standard index. In this case
-it evaluates to the length of the array. This provides a clean
-and consistent way to count back or forwards from the end of an
+it is treated as a number inside a standard index. In this case
+it evaluates to the length of the array. This provides a clean
+and consistent way to count back or forwards from the end of an
array:

@array[*-$N] # $N-th element back from end of array
@@ -656,7 +656,7 @@
Using a negative index on an array of fixed size will fail if the
resulting number of elements exceeds the defined size.

-Note that the behaviour of negative indices in Perl 6 is
+Note that the behaviour of negative indices in Perl 6 is
different to that in Perl 5:

# Perl 5...
@@ -665,8 +665,8 @@
.....:.....|_____|_____|_____|_____|_____|.....:.....:.....
[0] [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7]
[-7] [-6] [-5] [-4] [-3] [-2] [-1]
-

+
# Perl 6...
............_____________________________..................
: | | | | | | : :
@@ -1277,7 +1277,7 @@
natural consequences of the operators working on C<Failure>, qualitatively
different from autovivifying containers.

-The type of the type object returned by a non-successful lookup should
+The type of the type object returned by a non-successful lookup should
be identical to the type that would be returned for a successful lookup.
The only difference is whether it's officially instantiated (defined) yet.
That is, you cannot distinguish them via C<.WHAT> or C<.HOW>, only via

Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S10-packages.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S10-packages.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S10-packages.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -167,7 +167,7 @@
container object will be used in lvalue or rvalue context; the use
of a proxy object can supply either readonly or rw semantics later.

-When the package in question is a class, it is also possible to declare
+When the package in question is a class, it is also possible to declare
real methods or submethods:

multi method CANDO ($self: Code, $name, *%args --> Container)

Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S11-modules.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S11-modules.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S11-modules.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -380,7 +380,7 @@
class Dog:auth<http://www.some.com/~jrandom>:ver<1.2.1>;
class Dog:auth ;

-Since these are somewhat unweildy to look at, we allow a shorthand in
+Since these are somewhat unweildy to look at, we allow a shorthand in
which a bare subscripty adverb interprets its elements according to their
form:

@@ -413,7 +413,7 @@

class Pooch:name<Dog>:auth<cpan:JRANDOM>:ver<1.2.1>

-or
+or

class Pooch:<Dog cpan:JRANDOM 1.2.1>


Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S12-objects.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S12-objects.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S12-objects.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -351,7 +351,7 @@
discarded. Failure of the current candidate is indicated by calling
C<nextwith> or C<nextsame> (see L</Calling sets of methods> below).

-Note also that the
+Note also that the

$obj.$candidates(1,2,3)

@@ -1468,7 +1468,7 @@
For any named type, certain other types may automatically be derived
from it by appending an appropriate adverbial to its name:

- Int:A Allow either defined or undefined Int values
+ Int:A Allow either defined or undefined Int values
Int:U Allow only undefined (abstract) Int values
Int:D Allow only defined (concrete) Int values

@@ -1946,7 +1946,7 @@

Class traits may include:

- identifier { :name<Dog> :auth<http://www.some.com/~jrandom> :ver<1.2.1> }
+ identifier { :name<Dog> :auth<http://www.some.com/~jrandom> :ver<1.2.1> }
name Dog
authority http://www.some.com/~jrandom
version v1.2.1

Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S14-roles-and-parametric-types.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S14-roles-and-parametric-types.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S14-roles-and-parametric-types.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -563,7 +563,7 @@
on a container count in the type check. That is, if we have a sub:

sub f(Int @arr) { ... }
-
+
And call it with any of:

f([1,2,3]);

Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S16-io.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S16-io.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S16-io.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -32,7 +32,7 @@
=head2 Overridable IO handles

In Perl 6, there are the I<standard> IO handles, and any number of overriding
-inner filehandles for the same symbol.
+inner filehandles for the same symbol.

The I<standard> handles are our old familiar friends (with new names).
Standard input changed from STDIN to C<$*IN>, standard output changed
@@ -73,9 +73,9 @@

=head2 Roles and Classes

-The roles and classes that define most of the functionality for IO are defined in
-S32-setting-library/IO.pod. The main functions used are listed in S29 with references to
-S32-setting-library/IO.pod.
+The roles and classes that define most of the functionality for IO are defined in
+S32-setting-library/IO.pod. The main functions used are listed in S29 with references to
+S32-setting-library/IO.pod.

=head1 Name Services

@@ -93,21 +93,21 @@

method User new($Username?, $UID?) {...}

-Creates a new User object, fetching the information either by username or user ID.
+Creates a new User object, fetching the information either by username or user ID.

=item write

method write() {...}

-Tries to write the current User object to the user database. This may well fail.
+Tries to write the current User object to the user database. This may well fail.

=item Str

-When converted to a Str, returns $username.
+When converted to a Str, returns $username.

=item Num

-When converted to a Num, returns $uid.
+When converted to a Num, returns $uid.

=back

@@ -120,8 +120,8 @@
has $shell;
}

-All the information is naturally fetched from the system via getpwuid, getpwnam, or the
-like.
+All the information is naturally fetched from the system via getpwuid, getpwnam, or the
+like.

=head2 Group role

@@ -141,15 +141,15 @@

method write();

-Tries to write the group entry into the system group database.
+Tries to write the group entry into the system group database.

=back

=head2 OS::Unix::NameServices role

-The NameServices role has a bunch of functions that between them will return the whole
-Name Services database between them, as lists of objects. The lists are specifically
-intended to be lazy.
+The NameServices role has a bunch of functions that between them will return the whole
+Name Services database between them, as lists of objects. The lists are specifically
+intended to be lazy.

role NameServices {
method List of User users() {...} # getpwent, setpwent, endpwent

Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S17-concurrency.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S17-concurrency.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S17-concurrency.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -18,24 +18,24 @@
Last Modified: 27 Feb 2009
Version: 4

-This draft document is a paste together from various sources. The bulk of it is simply
-the old S17-concurrency.pod, which dealt only with concurrency. Signals were added from
-S16-io, but haven't been merged with the conflicting S17 signals doco. An event loop
-section has been added here because a) Larry mentioned the idea, and b) Moritz suggested
-that http://www.seas.upenn.edu/~lipeng/homepage/unify.html be our model for concurrency,
-and in that model, an event loop underlies the threads.
+This draft document is a paste together from various sources. The bulk of it is simply
+the old S17-concurrency.pod, which dealt only with concurrency. Signals were added from
+S16-io, but haven't been merged with the conflicting S17 signals doco. An event loop
+section has been added here because a) Larry mentioned the idea, and b) Moritz suggested
+that http://www.seas.upenn.edu/~lipeng/homepage/unify.html be our model for concurrency,
+and in that model, an event loop underlies the threads.

=head1 Overview

-An event loop underlies everything in this document. POSIX signals can interact with
-this, and concurrency is built on top of it. Naturally, IPC (inter-process communication)
-is documented here too (XXX or should be :) ).
+An event loop underlies everything in this document. POSIX signals can interact with
+this, and concurrency is built on top of it. Naturally, IPC (inter-process communication)
+is documented here too (XXX or should be :) ).

=head1 The Event Loop

=head1 POSIX Signals

-The %*SIG variable contains a Hash of Proc::Signals::Signal.
+The %*SIG variable contains a Hash of Proc::Signals::Signal.

class Proc::Signals::Signal {
has $exception; # This specifies what exception will be raised when this signal is received
@@ -43,10 +43,10 @@
has $blocked; # Is this signal blocked? cf. sigprocmask
}

-The @*SIGQUEUE array contains a queue of the signals that are blocked and queued.
+The @*SIGQUEUE array contains a queue of the signals that are blocked and queued.

-The standard POSIX signals simply raise control exceptions that are handled as normal
-through the control signal handler, and caught by CONTROL blocks, as specified in S04.
+The standard POSIX signals simply raise control exceptions that are handled as normal
+through the control signal handler, and caught by CONTROL blocks, as specified in S04.

To declare your main program catches INT signals, put a CONTROL block anywhere
in the toplevel to handle exceptions like this:
@@ -57,8 +57,8 @@

=head2 Signal defaults

-The signals have defaults as specified in the table below. $blocked always defaults to
-false.
+The signals have defaults as specified in the table below. $blocked always defaults to
+false.

Signal Default Exception
------ -----------------
@@ -98,7 +98,7 @@

=head2 Signal exceptions

-A table below describes the exceptions.
+A table below describes the exceptions.

Each of these has a default action as well. The possible actions are:

@@ -112,8 +112,8 @@

Cont Default action is to continue the process if it is currently stopped.

-Some actions do the Resumeable role. An exception listed in the table below that does the
-Resumeable role is marked with a * in the R column.
+Some actions do the Resumeable role. An exception listed in the table below that does the
+Resumeable role is marked with a * in the R column.

The exceptions are:

@@ -153,11 +153,11 @@
ControlExceptionSigLOST Term ? File lock lost
ControlExceptionSigWINCH Ign ? Window resize signal (4.3BSD, Sun)

-See L<S04-control> for details on how to handle exceptions.
+See L<S04-control> for details on how to handle exceptions.

-XXX I'm unsure how the actions in the table above can be made to make sense. The Ign
-actions are already dealt with because %SIG{CHLD}.exception already defaults to undef.
-The Term action will probably be self-solving (ie. will terminate the process). The
+XXX I'm unsure how the actions in the table above can be made to make sense. The Ign
+actions are already dealt with because %SIG{CHLD}.exception already defaults to undef.
+The Term action will probably be self-solving (ie. will terminate the process). The
others I'm just plain unsure about. XXX

=head1 Alarm
@@ -188,7 +188,7 @@
sleep 10;
CATCH {
is critical; # if you don't want $a2 to be raised inside this
- when Sig::ALARM { ... }
+ when Sig::ALARM { ... }
}
}


Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S19-commandline.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S19-commandline.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S19-commandline.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -354,7 +354,7 @@

=head2 Remaining arguments

-Any remaining arguments to the Perl6 program are placed in the @*ARGS array.
+Any remaining arguments to the Perl6 program are placed in the @*ARGS array.

=head1 Option Reference


Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S21-calling-foreign-code.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S21-calling-foreign-code.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S21-calling-foreign-code.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -19,15 +19,15 @@

The document is a draft.

-If you read the HTML version, it is generated from the pod in the pugs
+If you read the HTML version, it is generated from the pod in the pugs
repository under /docs/Perl6/Spec/S21-calling-foreign-code.pod so edit it there in
the SVN repository if you would like to make changes.

=head1 Overview

-Unfortunately, calling foreign code properly is quite platform dependent. This means that
-parts of the external calling conventions can't be standardised. But the parts that can
-be standardised are specified here.
+Unfortunately, calling foreign code properly is quite platform dependent. This means that
+parts of the external calling conventions can't be standardised. But the parts that can
+be standardised are specified here.

=head1 Specification
X<use>

Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S22-package-format.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S22-package-format.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S22-package-format.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -22,21 +22,21 @@

=head2 Terminology and Scope

-I'll start by listing a few terms, and whether this document is supposed to cover them or
-not.
+I'll start by listing a few terms, and whether this document is supposed to cover them or
+not.

=over

=item * .jib files; this is the source package format, and is specified in this document

-=item * CPAN6; this is a piece of software for managing an archive network (such as CPAN).
+=item * CPAN6; this is a piece of software for managing an archive network (such as CPAN).
This is not specified in this document; see http://cpan6.org/

-=item * PAUSE6; this is an actual network based on the cpan6 software (see above). It also
-is not documented here.
+=item * PAUSE6; this is an actual network based on the cpan6 software (see above). It also
+is not documented here.

-=item * CPAN6.pm; this is a piece of software that starts with what it can get on PAUSE6, and
-attempts to give you an installed perl module (this is a replacement for
+=item * CPAN6.pm; this is a piece of software that starts with what it can get on PAUSE6, and
+attempts to give you an installed perl module (this is a replacement for
CPANPLUS/cpan2dist)

=back
@@ -49,8 +49,8 @@

=item * Debian Policy: http://www.us.debian.org/doc/debian-policy

-=item * Software::Packager::Metadata:
-http://perlsoftpackmet.svn.sourceforge.net/viewvc/perlsoftpackmet/main/doc/ (click on the
+=item * Software::Packager::Metadata:
+http://perlsoftpackmet.svn.sourceforge.net/viewvc/perlsoftpackmet/main/doc/ (click on the
link in the Rev. column next to Overview)

=back

Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S26-documentation.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S26-documentation.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S26-documentation.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -109,11 +109,11 @@
=============== =================== ============== ======================
Boolean (true) C«:key» C«:key(1)» C«key => 1»
Boolean (false) C«:!key» C«:key(0)» C«key => 0»
- String C«:key<str>» C«:key('str')» C«key => 'str'»
- List C«:key<1 2 3>» C«:key[1,2,3]» C«key => [1,2,3]»
- Hash C«:key{a=>1, b=>2}» C«key => {a=>1, b=>2}»
+ String C«:key<str>» C«:key('str')» C«key => 'str'»
+ List C«:key<1 2 3>» C«:key[1,2,3]» C«key => [1,2,3]»
+ Hash C«:key{a=>1, b=>2}» C«key => {a=>1, b=>2}»
Code C«:key{ sqrt($_) }»
-
+
All option keys and values must, of course, be constants since Perldoc
is a specification language, not a programming language.
See L<Synopsis 2|http://dev.perl.org/perl6/doc/design/syn/S02.html#Literals>
@@ -195,7 +195,7 @@
= :width(50)
The applicant's full name

- =for Contact :optional
+ =for Contact :optional
The applicant's contact details


@@ -316,7 +316,7 @@
=begin item :term<C<:numbered>>

This option specifies that the block is to be numbered. The most common
-use of this option is to create L<numbered headings|#Numbered headings> and
+use of this option is to create L<numbered headings|#Numbered headings> and
L<ordered lists|#Ordered lists>, but it can be applied to any block.

It is up to individual renderers to decide how to display any numbering
@@ -422,7 +422,7 @@
=for head2 :numbered
Analysis

- =for head3
+ =for head3
Overview

=for head3
@@ -633,7 +633,7 @@
Although code blocks are verbatim by default, it can still occasionally
be useful to explicitly C<:allow> the verbatim formatting code (C<V<>>). That's
because, although the contents of an explicit C<=code> block are allowed to
-start in column 1, they are not allowed to start with
+start in column 1, they are not allowed to start with
an equals sign in that first columnN<Because an C<=> in the first column is
I<always> the start of a Pod directive>. So, if an C<=> is needed in column 1,
it must be declared L<verbatim|#Verbatim text>:
@@ -772,7 +772,7 @@

=comment WRONG...
=begin item1 --------------
- The choices are: |
+ The choices are: |
=item2 Liberty ==< Level 2 |==< Level 1
=item2 Death ==< Level 2 |
=item2 Beer ==< Level 2 |
@@ -952,9 +952,9 @@

=begin code :allow<B>
=for item B<:numbered> :term<SELFISH>
- Devoid of consideration for the selfishness of others.
+ Devoid of consideration for the selfishness of others.

- =for item B<:numbered> :term<SUCCESS>
+ =for item B<:numbered> :term<SUCCESS>
The one unpardonable sin against one's fellows.
=end code

@@ -1088,38 +1088,38 @@
This means you can create tables compactly, line-by-line:

=table
- The Shoveller Eddie Stevens King Arthur's singing shovel
- Blue Raja Geoffrey Smith Master of cutlery
- Mr Furious Roy Orson Ticking time bomb of fury
- The Bowler Carol Pinnsler Haunted bowling ball
+ The Shoveller Eddie Stevens King Arthur's singing shovel
+ Blue Raja Geoffrey Smith Master of cutlery
+ Mr Furious Roy Orson Ticking time bomb of fury
+ The Bowler Carol Pinnsler Haunted bowling ball

or line-by-line with multi-line headers:

=table
- Superhero | Secret |
- | Identity | Superpower
+ Superhero | Secret |
+ | Identity | Superpower
==============|=================|================================
- The Shoveller | Eddie Stevens | King Arthur's singing shovel
- Blue Raja | Geoffrey Smith | Master of cutlery
- Mr Furious | Roy Orson | Ticking time bomb of fury
- The Bowler | Carol Pinnsler | Haunted bowling ball
+ The Shoveller | Eddie Stevens | King Arthur's singing shovel
+ Blue Raja | Geoffrey Smith | Master of cutlery
+ Mr Furious | Roy Orson | Ticking time bomb of fury
+ The Bowler | Carol Pinnsler | Haunted bowling ball

or with multi-line headers I<and> multi-line data:

=begin table :caption('The Other Guys')

- Secret
- Superhero Identity Superpower
+ Secret
+ Superhero Identity Superpower
============= =============== ===================
The Shoveller Eddie Stevens King Arthur's
- singing shovel
+ singing shovel

- Blue Raja Geoffrey Smith Master of cutlery
+ Blue Raja Geoffrey Smith Master of cutlery

Mr Furious Roy Orson Ticking time bomb
- of fury
+ of fury

- The Bowler Carol Pinnsler Haunted bowling ball
+ The Bowler Carol Pinnsler Haunted bowling ball

=end table

@@ -1237,7 +1237,7 @@
=SYNOPSIS
=DESCRIPTION
=USAGE
- =INTERFACE
+ =INTERFACE
=METHOD
=SUBROUTINE
=OPTION
@@ -1250,7 +1250,7 @@
=ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
=AUTHOR
=COPYRIGHT
- =DISCLAIMER
+ =DISCLAIMER
=LICENCE
=LICENSE
=TITLE
@@ -1290,9 +1290,9 @@
=head1 SYNOPSIS
=begin code
use Perldoc::Parser
-
+
my Perldoc::Parser $parser .= new();
-
+
my $tree = $parser.parse($fh);
=end code
=end code
@@ -1314,7 +1314,7 @@

=begin code
use Perl6::Perldoc::Parser;
-
+
my $rep = Perl6::Perldoc::Parser.parse($fh, :all_pod);
=end code
=end nested
@@ -1388,7 +1388,7 @@
B<unusual> or distinctive; that it is of I<minor significance>. Typically
such content would be rendered in an underlined style.

-=item
+=item
The C<I<>> formatting code specifies that the contained text is
B<important>; that it is of I<major significance>. Such content would
typically be rendered in italics or in C< <em>...<em/> > tags
@@ -1542,7 +1542,7 @@
In Perl 5 POD, the ZB<Z<>><> code was widely used to break up text
that would otherwise be considered mark-up.

-That technique still works, but it's now easier to accomplish the same goal
+That technique still works, but it's now easier to accomplish the same goal
using a verbatim formatting code:

=for code :allow<B>
@@ -1652,14 +1652,14 @@
He was highly prone to B<D<lexiphania>>: an unfortunate proclivity
for employing grandiloquisms (for example, words such as "proclivity",
"grandiloquism" and indeed "lexiphania").
-
+
and later, to link back to the definition

=for code :allow<B>
To treat his chronic L<B<defn:lexiphania>> the doctor prescribed an
immediate glossoligation or, if that proved ineffective, a complete
cephalectomy.
-
+
=end item

=begin item :term<C<isbn:> and C<issn:>>
@@ -1668,7 +1668,7 @@
Serial Number for a publication. For example:

=for code :allow<B>
- The Perl Journal was a registered
+ The Perl Journal was a registered
serial publication (L<B<issn:1087-903X>>)

=end item
@@ -2135,7 +2135,7 @@
other code files, or to specify new types of documentation blocks and
formatting codes:

-=begin item
+=begin item

To create a standard Pod insertion or stylesheet, create a C<.pod>
file and install it in your documentation path. Load it with either:
@@ -2160,7 +2160,7 @@

=end item

-=begin item
+=begin item

To insert the Pod from a C<.pm> file (for example, to have your class
documentation include documentation from a base class):
@@ -2170,7 +2170,7 @@

=end item

-=begin item
+=begin item

To implement a new Pod block type or formatting code, create a C<.pm> file
and load it with either:
@@ -2185,7 +2185,7 @@

=end item

-=begin item
+=begin item

To create a module that inserts Pod and also C<require>'s a parser
extension, install a C<.pod> file that contains a nested C<=use> that

Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S28-special-names.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S28-special-names.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S28-special-names.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -19,14 +19,14 @@

=head2 Introduction

-This document serves as a collection point
-for what is known about special variables
-in Perl 6 and correlates them with the changes from Perl 5.
+This document serves as a collection point
+for what is known about special variables
+in Perl 6 and correlates them with the changes from Perl 5.

If you are trying to find the Perl 6 equivalent of a Perl 5 special
variable you know, try searching this file for the Perl 5 version.
Each main entry is followed by a note containing the corresponding
-Perl 5 variable(s). The list of main entries is also followed by
+Perl 5 variable(s). The list of main entries is also followed by
a table showing the 5 and 6 variables side-by-side.

=head2 Overview
@@ -72,7 +72,7 @@
$/ S05 Match # Last match
$0, $1, $2 S05 Str # First captured value from match: $/[0]
$?ARCH SoftwarePackage # Host architecture
- $?XARCH SoftwarePackage # Target architecture
+ $?XARCH SoftwarePackage # Target architecture
@*ARGS S06 Array of Str # command-line arguments
$*ARGFILES S02 IO # The magic command-line input handle
&?BLOCK S06 Block # current block (itself)
@@ -134,18 +134,18 @@

=head2 Special Classes

-These are classes defined especially for the benefit of the Special Variables.
+These are classes defined especially for the benefit of the Special Variables.

class SoftwarePackage {
has Str $name;
has Version $version;
}

-This class is intended to represent a software package at a fairly basic level.
+This class is intended to represent a software package at a fairly basic level.

=head3 Perl5 to Perl6 special variable translation

-If a column has a "-" in it, it means that item is unavailable in that version of Perl.
+If a column has a "-" in it, it means that item is unavailable in that version of Perl.

Perl 5 Perl 6 Comment
----------- ----------- -----------------------
@@ -153,7 +153,7 @@
STDOUT $*OUT See S16; actual variable is $PROCESS::OUT
STDERR $*ERR See S16; actual variable is $PROCESS::ERR
$_ $ARG $_ More lexically aware
- $_[1],$_[2].. $^a,$^b..
+ $_[1],$_[2].. $^a,$^b..
$a,$b - Just params to anonymous block
- $/ Object with results of last regex match
$1,$2,$3... $1,$2,$3...
@@ -161,8 +161,8 @@
$` $PREMATCH substr based on $/.from
$' $POSTMATCH substr based on $/.to
$+ - But info can now be retrieved from $/
- $^N $*MOST_RECENT_CAPTURED_MATCH ...or some such.
- or $/[*-$n] ...or omit
+ $^N $*MOST_RECENT_CAPTURED_MATCH ...or some such.
+ or $/[*-$n] ...or omit
@- $1.start, etc
@+ $1.end, etc.
%! -
@@ -204,9 +204,9 @@
${^WARNING_BITS} $?WARNINGS
$^X $*EXECUTABLE_NAME ...or some such
ARGV $*ARGFILE Note the P6 idiom for this handle:
- for lines() {
+ for lines() {
# each time through loop
- # proc a line from files named in ARGS
+ # proc a line from files named in ARGS
}
@ARGV @*ARGS
ARGVOUT TBD
@@ -222,14 +222,14 @@

=head2 NOT YET DEFINED

-The following items are not yet defined, but will need to be defined.
+The following items are not yet defined, but will need to be defined.

-XXX Don't remove this line until this section is completely blank.
+XXX Don't remove this line until this section is completely blank.

-We also seem to have $*INC in the table at the top, @*INC in S19 and the table
-immediately above, %*INC also in the table above.
+We also seem to have $*INC in the table at the top, @*INC in S19 and the table
+immediately above, %*INC also in the table above.

-The $?LANG and $*LANG variables are also confusing (both in S02).
+The $?LANG and $*LANG variables are also confusing (both in S02).

=head3 Form.pm


Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S29-functions.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S29-functions.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S29-functions.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@

The document is a draft.

-If you read the HTML version, it is generated from the pod in the pugs
+If you read the HTML version, it is generated from the pod in the pugs
repository under /docs/Perl6/Spec/S29-functions.pod so edit it there in
the SVN repository if you would like to make changes.

@@ -710,27 +710,27 @@

=head2 Non-default Functions

-These functions which existed in perl5 still exist, but are not part of the default
-namespace any more.
+These functions which existed in perl5 still exist, but are not part of the default
+namespace any more.

=head3 Container

The following functions can now be found in or replaced by something in the Container
-modules.
+modules.

delete, exists, pop, push, shift, splice, unshift

=head3 Numeric

The following functions can now be found in or replaced by something in the Numeric
-modules.
+modules.

abs, atan2, cos, exp, log, rand, sqrt, sin

=head3 IO

-The following functions can now be found in or replaced by something in the IO
-modules.
+The following functions can now be found in or replaced by something in the IO
+modules.

accept, bind, binmode, chdir, chmod, chown, close, closedir, connect
eof, fcntl, fileno, flock, getc, getsockname, getsockopt, glob, ioctl, link, listen
@@ -741,24 +741,24 @@

=head3 Temporal

-The following functions can now be found in or replaced by something in the Temporal
-modules.
+The following functions can now be found in or replaced by something in the Temporal
+modules.

gmtime, localtime, time

=head3 String

-The following functions can now be found in or replaced by something in the String
-module.
+The following functions can now be found in or replaced by something in the String
+module.

-chop, chomp, index, lc, lcfirst, pack, quotemeta, rindex, split, sprintf, substr, uc,
+chop, chomp, index, lc, lcfirst, pack, quotemeta, rindex, split, sprintf, substr, uc,
ucfirst, unpack

=head2 Obsolete Functions

-Some of these are obsoleted only as general functions, and are still available by using
-the right packages. Others are obsoleted in that they're keywords, rather than functions
-(these are in their own section, below).
+Some of these are obsoleted only as general functions, and are still available by using
+the right packages. Others are obsoleted in that they're keywords, rather than functions
+(these are in their own section, below).

=over 4

@@ -778,11 +778,11 @@

=item each

-See .pairs() method, above.
+See .pairs() method, above.

=item endpwent, endgrent, endservent, endprotoent, endnetent, endhostent

-The NameServices role in S16 covers most of these.
+The NameServices role in S16 covers most of these.

=item format, formline

@@ -790,17 +790,17 @@

=item getgrgid, getgrnam, getpwnam, getpwuid

-The User and Group roles in S16 cover most of these.
+The User and Group roles in S16 cover most of these.

=item getpwent, getgrent, getservent, getnetent, gethostent

-The NameServices role in S16 covers most of these.
+The NameServices role in S16 covers most of these.

=item length()

-This word is banned in Perl 6. You must specify units. In practise, this probably means
-you want Str.chars(), although it could be Str.bytes(), or even something else. See
-S32-setting-library/String for details.
+This word is banned in Perl 6. You must specify units. In practise, this probably means
+you want Str.chars(), although it could be Str.bytes(), or even something else. See
+S32-setting-library/String for details.

=item msgctl, msgget, msgrcv, msgsnd

@@ -846,7 +846,7 @@

=item setpwent, setgrent, setservent, setprotoent, setnetent, sethostent

-The NameServices role in S16 covers most of these.
+The NameServices role in S16 covers most of these.

=item shmctl, shmget, shmread, shmwrite

@@ -863,17 +863,17 @@
unless some representation is made to that effect in the declaration.
Note: P5's tied() is roughly replaced by P6's variable().

-XXX Examples?
+XXX Examples?

-my $foo is ....? is tie
-the meta operation on the container type for 'rebless' -
+my $foo is ....? is tie
+the meta operation on the container type for 'rebless' -
macro tie ( $var, $class, *@args ) { CODE { variable($var).meta.rebless( $class, *@args ) } } )

endXXX

=item untie

-See notes on "tie", above, but basically these are replaced with container classes.
+See notes on "tie", above, but basically these are replaced with container classes.

=item vec

@@ -892,15 +892,15 @@

=head3 Keywords

-The following were listed in Perl 5's perlfunc, but should now be considered keywords
-rather than functions.
+The following were listed in Perl 5's perlfunc, but should now be considered keywords
+rather than functions.

last, my, next, no, our, package, return, sub, use

=head1 Default Export Questions

-Not sure whether these are exported by default or not. Also, many may no longer exist; if
-so, they should be entered in the "Obsolete" section.
+Not sure whether these are exported by default or not. Also, many may no longer exist; if
+so, they should be entered in the "Obsolete" section.

=over


Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S31-pragmatic-modules.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S31-pragmatic-modules.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S31-pragmatic-modules.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -18,7 +18,7 @@

The document is a draft.

-If you read the HTML version, it is generated from the pod in the pugs
+If you read the HTML version, it is generated from the pod in the pugs
repository under /docs/Perl6/Spec/S31-pragmatic-modules.pod so edit it there in
the SVN repository if you would like to make changes.

@@ -33,7 +33,7 @@
All floating point IEEE modes must be lexically available via pragma except in cases
where that would entail heroic efforts to bypass a braindead platform.

-XXX FIX: I (Tim Nelson) have no clue as to what the above entails, so the spec does not
+XXX FIX: I (Tim Nelson) have no clue as to what the above entails, so the spec does not
reflect this XXX

=head1 Pragmata

Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Abstraction.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Abstraction.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Abstraction.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@

The document is a draft.

-If you read the HTML version, it is generated from the pod in the pugs
+If you read the HTML version, it is generated from the pod in the pugs
repository under /docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Abstraction.pod so edit it there in
the SVN repository if you would like to make changes.


Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Basics.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Basics.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Basics.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@

The document is a draft.

-If you read the HTML version, it is generated from the pod in the pugs
+If you read the HTML version, it is generated from the pod in the pugs
repository under /docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Basics.pod so edit it there in
the SVN repository if you would like to make changes.

@@ -85,7 +85,7 @@

method true() {...}

-XXX Copied from S02 -- should it be deleted from there?
+XXX Copied from S02 -- should it be deleted from there?

The definition of C<.Bool> for the most ancestral type (that is, the
C<Object> type) is equivalent to C<.defined>. Since type objects are
@@ -173,7 +173,7 @@

our Bool multi method isa ($self:, $type)

-Returns C<True> if a the invocant an instance of class C<$type>, or
+Returns C<True> if a the invocant an instance of class C<$type>, or
of a subset type or a derived class (through inheritance) of C<$type>.

=item perl
@@ -201,11 +201,11 @@

=item ACCEPTS

-Used in smartmatching; see S03.
+Used in smartmatching; see S03.

=item REJECTS

-Used in smartmatching; see S03.
+Used in smartmatching; see S03.

=head2 Scalar

@@ -235,7 +235,7 @@

=item VAR

-This is not really a method, but some kind of macro. See L<S12> for details.
+This is not really a method, but some kind of macro. See L<S12> for details.

=back


Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Callable.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Callable.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Callable.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -18,16 +18,16 @@

The document is a draft.

-If you read the HTML version, it is generated from the pod in the pugs
+If you read the HTML version, it is generated from the pod in the pugs
repository under /docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Exception.pod so edit it there in
the SVN repository if you would like to make changes.

-This document documents Code, Block, Signature, Capture, Routine, Sub, Method, Submethod,
-and Macro.
+This document documents Code, Block, Signature, Capture, Routine, Sub, Method, Submethod,
+and Macro.

=head1 Roles

-=head2 Callable
+=head2 Callable

role Callable {...}

@@ -42,7 +42,7 @@
method Code assuming(...) {...}
method do() {...} # See L<S12/Introspection>
method Bool defined {...}
- # XXX What does do() return? I mean, it's a "method body", but what's that?
+ # XXX What does do() return? I mean, it's a "method body", but what's that?
}

For C<Code>, the C<.defined> method returns whether a body has
@@ -91,13 +91,13 @@

=item unwrap

-See L<S06/Wrapping>.
+See L<S06/Wrapping>.

=item wrap

method wrap(Code $code) {...}

-See L<S06/Wrapping>.
+See L<S06/Wrapping>.

=head2 Sub


Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Containers.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Containers.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Containers.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@

The document is a draft.

-If you read the HTML version, it is generated from the pod in the pugs
+If you read the HTML version, it is generated from the pod in the pugs
repository under /docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Containers.pod so edit it there in
the SVN repository if you would like to make changes.

@@ -656,14 +656,14 @@
our Junction multi method any( %hash: ) is export

Returns a junction with all the keys of the hash C<|>-ed together. The
-junction will only match against another value if at least one of the
+junction will only match against another value if at least one of the
keys in the hash matches.

=item all

our Junction multi method all( %hash: ) is export

-Returns a junction with all the keys of the hash C<&>-ed together. The
+Returns a junction with all the keys of the hash C<&>-ed together. The
junction will only match against another value if all of the keys in the hash
match.

@@ -673,13 +673,13 @@

Returns a junction with all the keys of the hash C<^>-ed together. The
junction will only match against another value if exactly one of the keys
-in the hash matches.
+in the hash matches.

=item none

our Junction multi method none( %hash: ) is export

-Returns a junction which will only match against another value if none of
+Returns a junction which will only match against another value if none of
the keys in the hash matches.

=item invert
@@ -700,7 +700,7 @@
alternating keys and values; however, unlike assignment, when
a duplicate key is detected, coerces the colliding entry's value to an
array and pushes the Pair's value onto that array. Hence to invert
-a hash containing duplicate values without losing (associative) information,
+a hash containing duplicate values without losing (associative) information,
say:

%out.push(%in.invert)
@@ -718,8 +718,8 @@

=head1 Classes

-This documents Buf, List, Seq, Range, Set, Bag, Junction, Array, Hash, KeyHash, KeySet,
-KeyBag, Pair, and Mapping.
+This documents Buf, List, Seq, Range, Set, Bag, Junction, Array, Hash, KeyHash, KeySet,
+KeyBag, Pair, and Mapping.

=head2 Seq


Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Exception.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Exception.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Exception.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -19,14 +19,14 @@

The document is a draft.

-If you read the HTML version, it is generated from the pod in the pugs
+If you read the HTML version, it is generated from the pod in the pugs
repository under /docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Exception.pod so edit it there in
the SVN repository if you would like to make changes.

=head1 Roles

role Exception does Positional {
- # XXX How do we tell the difference between a warning and a fatal error?
+ # XXX How do we tell the difference between a warning and a fatal error?
}

role Resumeable {

Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/IO.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/IO.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/IO.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -27,7 +27,7 @@

The document is a draft.

-If you read the HTML version, it is generated from the pod in the pugs
+If you read the HTML version, it is generated from the pod in the pugs
repository under /docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/IO.pod so edit it there in
the SVN repository if you would like to make changes.

@@ -104,7 +104,7 @@
method uri(Str $uri --> IO::Streamable);
sub uri(Str $uri --> IO::Streamable);

-Returns an appropriate C<IO::Streamable> descendant, with the type depending on the uri
+Returns an appropriate C<IO::Streamable> descendant, with the type depending on the uri
passed in. Here are some example mappings:

URI type IO type
@@ -113,12 +113,12 @@
ftp: IO::Socket::INET (data channel)
http: IO::Socket::INET

-These can naturally be overridden or added to by other modules.
+These can naturally be overridden or added to by other modules.

=item %*PROTOCOLS context variable

-For each protocol, stores a type name that should be instantiated by calling the C<uri>
-constructor on that type, and passing in the appropriate uri.
+For each protocol, stores a type name that should be instantiated by calling the C<uri>
+constructor on that type, and passing in the appropriate uri.

=back

@@ -141,9 +141,9 @@
method read($buf is rw, Int $bytes --> Int)
}

-When the C<$.isReadable> is set, it tries to change the readability of the filehandle. This
-is not always possible, but can be done in a number of cases. C<IO::Socket> can remove
-readability by calling C<shutdown>, for example.
+When the C<$.isReadable> is set, it tries to change the readability of the filehandle. This
+is not always possible, but can be done in a number of cases. C<IO::Socket> can remove
+readability by calling C<shutdown>, for example.

=over

@@ -170,8 +170,8 @@
method write($buf, Int $bytes --> Int)
}

-When the C<$.isWriteable> is set, it tries to change the writeability of the filehandle.
-This is not always possible, but can be done in a number of cases. C<IO::Socket> can remove
+When the C<$.isWriteable> is set, it tries to change the writeability of the filehandle.
+This is not always possible, but can be done in a number of cases. C<IO::Socket> can remove
writeability by calling shutdown(), for example.

=over
@@ -195,11 +195,11 @@

=item method eoi( --> Bool)

-EOI = End Of Input -- equivalent to End Of File, but applies to other kinds of sockets as
-well.
+EOI = End Of Input -- equivalent to End Of File, but applies to other kinds of sockets as
+well.

-Returns true if it's the end of the input (ie. end of file or whatever), returns false if
-not, returns undef if we can't say for certain.
+Returns true if it's the end of the input (ie. end of file or whatever), returns false if
+not, returns undef if we can't say for certain.

=item method seek(Int $position --> Bool)

@@ -217,7 +217,7 @@
Indicates that this object performs buffering. The management of the
buffer is completely implementation specific.

-=over
+=over

=item method flush( --> Bool)

@@ -261,10 +261,10 @@
--> IO::Streamable
) {...}

-Unless the NoOpen option is passed, an open will be done on the C<IO> object when it is
-created.
+Unless the NoOpen option is passed, an open will be done on the C<IO> object when it is
+created.

-If blocking is passed in, .blocking() is called (see below).
+If blocking is passed in, .blocking() is called (see below).

=item method blocking( --> Bool) is rw

@@ -276,10 +276,10 @@

method uri(Str $uri --> IO::Streamable) {...}

-This should be callable on the class, and act like a kind of "new()" function. When given
-a URI, it returns an C<IO::Streamable> of the appropriate type, and throws an error when an
-inappropriate type is passed in. For example, calling C<IO::File.uri('http://....')> will
-throw an error (but will suggest using just uri('http://...') instead).
+This should be callable on the class, and act like a kind of "new()" function. When given
+a URI, it returns an C<IO::Streamable> of the appropriate type, and throws an error when an
+inappropriate type is passed in. For example, calling C<IO::File.uri('http://....')> will
+throw an error (but will suggest using just uri('http://...') instead).

=back

@@ -373,8 +373,8 @@
This role provides encoded access to a writeable data stream, implies
C<IO::Encoded>. Might imply C<IO::Buffered>, but that's not a requirement.

-If these are called in their non-object form, they operate on C<$*OUT>, except in the
-case of warn(), which operates on C<$*ERR>. The form with leading dot prints C<$_> to
+If these are called in their non-object form, they operate on C<$*OUT>, except in the
+case of warn(), which operates on C<$*ERR>. The form with leading dot prints C<$_> to
the appropriate handle unless C<$_> happens to be a filehandle.

=over
@@ -461,9 +461,9 @@

Closes the file or pipe associated with the object.

-Returns C<True> on success, but might return an unthrown C<Failure>.
+Returns C<True> on success, but might return an unthrown C<Failure>.
Returns true only if C<IO> buffers are successfully flushed and closes the system
-file descriptor.
+file descriptor.

Unlike in Perl 5, an C<IO> object is not a special symbol table entry
neither this object is available magically anywhere else. But as in
@@ -474,11 +474,11 @@

=head2 IO::Socket

- role IO::Socket
- does IO::Closeable
- does IO::Readable
- does IO::Writeable
- does IO::Streamable
+ role IO::Socket
+ does IO::Closeable
+ does IO::Readable
+ does IO::Writeable
+ does IO::Streamable
{
has %.options;
has Bool $.Listener;
@@ -487,7 +487,7 @@

Accessing the C<%.options> would on Unix be done with I<getsockopt(2)>/I<setsockopt(2)>.

-The $.Listener attribute indicates whether the socket will be a listening socket when
+The $.Listener attribute indicates whether the socket will be a listening socket when
opened, rather than indicating whether it is currently listening.

=over
@@ -504,34 +504,34 @@
* If neither a local address nor a remote address are passed in, throw an exception
* If no remote address is passed, then $.Listener is set to SOMAXCONN
* If no local address is used, then $Listener is set to 0
- * If both local and remote addresses are used, throw an exception that asks people to
+ * If both local and remote addresses are used, throw an exception that asks people to
specify $Listener

=item open

method open()

-If $.Listener is true, does a I<bind(2)> and a I<listen(2)>, otherwise does a
-I<connect(2)>.
+If $.Listener is true, does a I<bind(2)> and a I<listen(2)>, otherwise does a
+I<connect(2)>.

-It's end-user use case is intended for the case where NoOpen is passed to .new(). .new()
-itself will presumably also call it.
+It's end-user use case is intended for the case where NoOpen is passed to .new(). .new()
+itself will presumably also call it.

=item close

method close()

-Implements the close() function from IO::Closeable by doing a shutdown on the connection
-(see below) with @how set to ('Readable', 'Writeable').
+Implements the close() function from IO::Closeable by doing a shutdown on the connection
+(see below) with @how set to ('Readable', 'Writeable').

=item shutdown

method shutdown(Array of Str @how)

-Does a I<shutdown(2)> on the connection. See also IO::Readable.isReadable and
-IO::Writeable.isWriteable.
+Does a I<shutdown(2)> on the connection. See also IO::Readable.isReadable and
+IO::Writeable.isWriteable.

-$how can contain 1 or more of the strings 'Readable' and 'Writeable'.
+$how can contain 1 or more of the strings 'Readable' and 'Writeable'.

=item accept

@@ -539,7 +539,7 @@

=item method read($buf is rw, Int $bytes --> Int)

-Implementes the IO::Readable interface by doing a I<recv(2)>.
+Implementes the IO::Readable interface by doing a I<recv(2)>.

=item method write($buf, Int $bytes --> Int)

@@ -566,7 +566,7 @@

=head2 IO::File

-This does file input and output.
+This does file input and output.

class IO::File does IO::Streamable {
...
@@ -577,16 +577,16 @@
=item new

method new(
- FSNode :$FSNode,
+ FSNode :$FSNode,
Str :$Filename,
:$fd
- Bool :$NoOpen,
+ Bool :$NoOpen,
:$Writeable,
:$Readable
);

-The C<FSNode>, C<Filename> and C<fd> options are mutually exclusive. If "C<use portable>" is in
-effect, the C<Filename> option throws an error; use an C<FSNode> instead.
+The C<FSNode>, C<Filename> and C<fd> options are mutually exclusive. If "C<use portable>" is in
+effect, the C<Filename> option throws an error; use an C<FSNode> instead.

C<NoOpen> is passed to C<IO::Streamable.new()>

@@ -597,7 +597,7 @@

# Write -- works with 'use portable'
$fobj = new IO::File(
- FSNode => IO::FSNode.new(type => 'Unix', Filename => $filename),
+ FSNode => IO::FSNode.new(type => 'Unix', Filename => $filename),
Writeable => 1
);

@@ -609,7 +609,7 @@

=item open()

-This function opens a file that had the C<NoOpen> option passed to the C<new> method.
+This function opens a file that had the C<NoOpen> option passed to the C<new> method.

=item IO.truncate

@@ -621,7 +621,7 @@

=head2 IO::FileSystem

-This represents the filesystem.
+This represents the filesystem.

class IO::FileSystem does IO::Streamable {
has Str $.fstype; # ext3, ntfs, vfat, reiserfs, etc
@@ -652,10 +652,10 @@
...
}

-The C<%times> has keys that can be eg. C<ctime>, C<Modification>, and C<Access> (and maybe others on
-other operating systems), and the values are all C<Temporal::Instant> objects.
+The C<%times> has keys that can be eg. C<ctime>, C<Modification>, and C<Access> (and maybe others on
+other operating systems), and the values are all C<Temporal::Instant> objects.

-When C<.path> is implemented, it should return the path that this was opened with.
+When C<.path> is implemented, it should return the path that this was opened with.

=over 4

@@ -721,9 +721,9 @@

=back

-There may be other reasons you can't actually read, write, or execute
-the file. Such reasons may be for example network filesystem access
-controls and unrecognized executable formats.
+There may be other reasons you can't actually read, write, or execute
+the file. Such reasons may be for example network filesystem access
+controls and unrecognized executable formats.

Also note that, for the superuser on the local filesystems, the C<:r>,
C<:R>, C<:w>, and C<:W> tests always return 1, and C<:x> and C<:X> return 1
@@ -761,22 +761,22 @@

method infix:<===>(Str $filename);

-Test whether the specified filename is the same file as this file. On a Unix system,
-this would presumably be done by comparing inode numbers or something.
+Test whether the specified filename is the same file as this file. On a Unix system,
+this would presumably be done by comparing inode numbers or something.

=item new

-This is called automatically on object creation.
+This is called automatically on object creation.

multi method new(Array of Str :@PathElements);
multi method new(Str :$Type, Str :$Path, Str :$Create);
multi method new(Str :$Path);

-This last throws an error if "C<use portable>" pragma is used.
+This last throws an error if "C<use portable>" pragma is used.

-If the C<Create> option is passed in, and the node doesn't exist in the filesystem, it
-attempts to create the node; this can be used for I<mkdir>, I<link>, and similar
-functionality.
+If the C<Create> option is passed in, and the node doesn't exist in the filesystem, it
+attempts to create the node; this can be used for I<mkdir>, I<link>, and similar
+functionality.

Examples:

@@ -786,21 +786,21 @@

=item delete

-This deletes the C<FSNode> from the filesystem. If the node has children, it throws an error
-unless the C<Recursive> option is specified. Returns the number of nodes deleted.
+This deletes the C<FSNode> from the filesystem. If the node has children, it throws an error
+unless the C<Recursive> option is specified. Returns the number of nodes deleted.

=back

=head2 IO::FSNodeACL

-This is a basic abstraction; for better control, use the operating-system specific
-interfaces, over which this is a thin veneer.
+This is a basic abstraction; for better control, use the operating-system specific
+interfaces, over which this is a thin veneer.

class IO::FSNodeACL {
has Str $.type; # "User", "Group", "Everyone", ???
has Str $.id; # username or groupname; unused for $type eq "Everyone"
has %.permissions;
- # Unsupported values may (or may not) throw
+ # Unsupported values may (or may not) throw
# UnsupportedPermission when set or read
has IO::FSNode $.owningObject;
...
@@ -812,28 +812,28 @@

=item Readable

-Should be supported by all filesystems as an item to read from the hash for the group
-"Everyone".
+Should be supported by all filesystems as an item to read from the hash for the group
+"Everyone".

=item Writeable

-Should be supported by all filesystems as an item to read from the hash for the group
-"Everyone".
+Should be supported by all filesystems as an item to read from the hash for the group
+"Everyone".

=item Executeable

-Supported on most Unix systems, anyway. Windows should be able to guess when this is
-read, and throw an exception if written to.
+Supported on most Unix systems, anyway. Windows should be able to guess when this is
+read, and throw an exception if written to.

=item Default

-An ACL of User,fred,Default sets the user "fred" to be the owner of the file. This can be
-done with groups too. Works on Unix, at least.
+An ACL of User,fred,Default sets the user "fred" to be the owner of the file. This can be
+done with groups too. Works on Unix, at least.

=back

-The C<$.owningObject> attribute of C<FSNodeACL> shows what the ACL is set on. On a
-Windows system, this can be a parent directory, as permissions are inherited.
+The C<$.owningObject> attribute of C<FSNodeACL> shows what the ACL is set on. On a
+Windows system, this can be a parent directory, as permissions are inherited.

=head2 IO::FileNode

@@ -916,7 +916,7 @@
Str :$enc = "Unicode",
);

-Opens a directory for processing, if the C<new> method was passed the C<NoOpen> option.
+Opens a directory for processing, if the C<new> method was passed the C<NoOpen> option.
Makes the directory looks like
a list of autochomped lines, so just use ordinary C<IO> operators after the open.

@@ -934,7 +934,7 @@

=item chdir

-Changes the current working directory to the one specified by FILENAME.
+Changes the current working directory to the one specified by FILENAME.
If it succeeds it returns true, otherwise it returns C<Failure> and
sets C<$!> (errno).

@@ -946,7 +946,7 @@

=item new

-Creates a new link in the filesystem.
+Creates a new link in the filesystem.

IO::LinkNode.new(
Name => '/home/wayland/symlink.txt'
@@ -954,14 +954,14 @@
Type => 'Hard', # Default is Symbolic
);

-Reads in the previously created symlink.
+Reads in the previously created symlink.

$link = IO::LinkNode.new(
Name => '/home/wayland/symlink.txt',
);
print $link.target; # prints /home/wayland/realfile.txt

-Neither of these is "C<use portable>" compatible.
+Neither of these is "C<use portable>" compatible.

=head2 IO::Socket::INET

@@ -1003,8 +1003,8 @@
...
}

-Will need to set IO::Readable.isReadable and IO::Writable.isWriteable depending on opening
-method.
+Will need to set IO::Readable.isReadable and IO::Writable.isWriteable depending on opening
+method.

=over

@@ -1130,7 +1130,7 @@
=item new

method new(
- Str :$RemoteAddr,
+ Str :$RemoteAddr,
Str :$LocalAddr,

Bool :$Listener, # Passed to IO::Socket.new()
@@ -1188,7 +1188,7 @@

multi prompt (Str $prompt --> Str)

-Should there be an IO::Interactive role?
+Should there be an IO::Interactive role?

=item Str.readpipe

@@ -1214,15 +1214,15 @@

=item /(get|set)(host|net|proto|serv|sock).*/

-Should be implemented by an external library.
+Should be implemented by an external library.

=item lstat

-Use C<stat> with the C<:link> option.
+Use C<stat> with the C<:link> option.

=item IO.name

-Changed to C<.path>, but we haven't gotten around to specifying this on all of them.
+Changed to C<.path>, but we haven't gotten around to specifying this on all of them.

The C<.name> method returns the name of the file/socket/uri the handle
was opened with, if known. Returns undef otherwise. There is no
@@ -1254,7 +1254,7 @@

=item utime

-Gone, see C<IO::FSNode.times>.
+Gone, see C<IO::FSNode.times>.

=back


Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Numeric.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Numeric.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Numeric.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -24,11 +24,11 @@

The document is a draft.

-If you read the HTML version, it is generated from the pod in the pugs
+If you read the HTML version, it is generated from the pod in the pugs
repository under /docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Numeric.pod so edit it there in
the SVN repository if you would like to make changes.

-This documents Bit, Int, Num, Rat, Complex, and Bool.
+This documents Bit, Int, Num, Rat, Complex, and Bool.

XXX So where are Bit, Int, and Rat

@@ -218,13 +218,13 @@

method re() {...}

-Returns the real part of the complex number.
+Returns the real part of the complex number.

=item im

method im() {...}

-Returns the imaginary part of a complex number.
+Returns the imaginary part of a complex number.

=back


Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Rules.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Rules.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Rules.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@

The document is a draft.

-If you read the HTML version, it is generated from the pod in the pugs
+If you read the HTML version, it is generated from the pod in the pugs
repository under /docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Exception.pod so edit it there in
the SVN repository if you would like to make changes.


Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Str.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Str.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Str.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -24,8 +24,8 @@

The document is a draft.

-If you read the HTML version, it is generated from the pod in the pugs
-repository under /docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Miscellaneous-scalars.pod
+If you read the HTML version, it is generated from the pod in the pugs
+repository under /docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Miscellaneous-scalars.pod
so edit it there in the SVN repository if you would like to make changes.

=head1 Str
@@ -391,15 +391,15 @@

You may also comb lists and filehandles. C<+$*IN.comb> counts the words on
standard input, for instance. C<comb(/./, $thing)> returns a list of single
-C<Char> strings from anything that can give you a C<Str>. Lists and
-filehandles are automatically fed through C<cat> in order to pretend to
+C<Char> strings from anything that can give you a C<Str>. Lists and
+filehandles are automatically fed through C<cat> in order to pretend to
be string. This C<Cat> is also lazy.

If the C<:match> adverb is applied, a list of C<Match> objects (one
-per match) is returned instead of strings. This can be used to
+per match) is returned instead of strings. This can be used to
access capturing subrules in the matcher. The unmatched portions
-are never returned -- if you want that, use C<split :all>. If the
-function is combing a lazy structure, the return values may also be
+are never returned -- if you want that, use C<split :all>. If the
+function is combing a lazy structure, the return values may also be
lazy. (Strings are not lazy, however.)

=item words

Modified: docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Temporal.pod
===================================================================
--- docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Temporal.pod 2009-07-05 04:23:44 UTC (rev 27414)
+++ docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Temporal.pod 2009-07-05 05:25:11 UTC (rev 27415)
@@ -26,7 +26,7 @@

The document is a draft.

-If you read the HTML version, it is generated from the pod in the pugs
+If you read the HTML version, it is generated from the pod in the pugs
repository under /docs/Perl6/Spec/S32-setting-library/Temporal.pod so edit it there in
the SVN repository if you would like to make changes.

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postedJul 5, '09 at 5:25a
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