Grokbase Groups Perl ai June 2002
FAQ
I have two image,

A is a photo,
B is a part of A,

How can I know where (x,y) is the photo B in Photo A?

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  • Ken at Jun 11, 2002 at 9:46 am
    I have two image,

    A is a photo,
    B is a part of A,

    How can I know where (x,y) is the photo B in Photo A?
  • Leon Brocard at Jun 11, 2002 at 11:38 am

    ken sent the following bits through the ether:

    I have two image, A is a photo, B is a part of A. How can I know
    where (x,y) is the photo B in Photo A?
    If B is an exact partial image of A then look at the images like a
    string and look for the right seqeuences of colours. A more
    interesting case is covered by the following paper (interesting links
    too): http://citeseer.nj.nec.com/336979.html

    Hope this helps, Leon
    --
    Leon Brocard.............................http://www.astray.com/
    Nanoware...............................http://www.nanoware.org/

    .... Brain over - Insert coin
  • Lee Goddard at Jun 11, 2002 at 12:05 pm

    At 13:36 11/06/2002, Leon Brocard wrote:
    ken sent the following bits through the ether:
    I have two image, A is a photo, B is a part of A. How can I know
    where (x,y) is the photo B in Photo A?
    If B is an exact partial image of A then look at the images like a
    string and look for the right seqeuences of colours.
    Which will work if B is aligned neatly, like a nice clip of A.

    If it's not aligned, then you're probably going to be stuck for
    a while. Artificial Neural Networks could easily find B if it
    really is a subset of A: there are lots and lots of papers on
    the matter around.... here's my ANN reading list, if it helps:

    Neural Networks for Pattern Recognition
    by Christopher M. Bishop. Oxford University
    Introduction to the Theory of Neural Computation, Addison-Wesley Redwood
    City, 1991
    J. Hertz, A. Krogh and R. Palmer
    Neural Networks. An Introduction, Springer-Verlag Berlin, 1991
    B. Mueller and J. Reinhardt
    Pattern Recognition and Neural Networks
    by Brian D. Ripley. Cambridge University Press. Jan 1996. ISBN 0 521 46086 7.
    Neural Networks, Prentice Hall, 1994
    S.Haykin
    Pattern Classification, John Wiley, 2001
    R.O. Duda and P.E. Hart and D.G. Stock

    A more
    interesting case is covered by the following paper (interesting links
    too): http://citeseer.nj.nec.com/336979.html
    But it looks like both our suggestions would require something
    more powerful than little ol' Perl (no flames, please).

    lee
  • Ala Qumsieh at Jun 11, 2002 at 12:56 pm

    Lee writes:
    At 13:36 11/06/2002, Leon Brocard wrote:
    ken sent the following bits through the ether:
    I have two image, A is a photo, B is a part of A. How can I know
    where (x,y) is the photo B in Photo A?
    If B is an exact partial image of A then look at the images like a
    string and look for the right seqeuences of colours.
    Which will work if B is aligned neatly, like a nice clip of A.

    If it's not aligned, then you're probably going to be stuck for
    a while. Artificial Neural Networks could easily find B if it
    really is a subset of A: there are lots and lots of papers on
    the matter around.... here's my ANN reading list, if it helps:
    This problem is called "image registration" or "image stitching" or "image
    mosaicing". There are plently of papers written on the subject, most of
    which don't use AI techniques. The most widely used method is getting the
    Fourier transform of both images and comparing them; but this only works if
    there is no change in rotation between the images. I, personally, have
    written a paper to do just that using Zernike moments. Many other approaches
    exist, each with it's ups and downs.
    A more
    interesting case is covered by the following paper (interesting links
    too): http://citeseer.nj.nec.com/336979.html
    But it looks like both our suggestions would require something
    more powerful than little ol' Perl (no flames, please).
    You certainly *CAN* do it with Perl. The question is whether you *WANT* to!

    --Ala
  • Lee Goddard at Jun 11, 2002 at 2:35 pm
    You certainly *CAN* do it with Perl. The question is whether you *WANT* to!
    I bow to your superior syntax! A pleasure, too.

    lee

    --Ala
    Lee Goddard
    perl -e "while(1){print rand>0.5?chr 47:chr 92}"

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