Hello, i'm actually doing the same!!! How did it go?
Can you please send some info to goncalo1977@gmail.com?
Thanks in advance,
GP
On Tuesday, May 26, 2009 11:08:59 PM UTC+1, Spree.developper wrote:

Hi,

I am preparing my end of studies(i use Spree in my application e-
commerce)
Well ! so I'm preparing my folder, i will present Spree the day of my
defense...

I would be delighted if Spree or Users Spree have or could send me
some documentation to defend the choice to use Spree, and if some
graphic concept (UML) Spree.


All my greetings and respect,thank you in advance.
--
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  • Nate Lowrie at Dec 20, 2012 at 10:02 pm
    I thought I would add a little bit about the Spree/Substruct comments. I
    have a substruct site that is 4 years old and am currently in the process
    of migrating my store. The main reason for switching was that Substruct is
    essentially abondonware. There hasn't been an update in over a year and
    the lists get maybe 1-2 posts a month. The latest edge is still on rails
    2.3.10 and still hasn't been updated to take advantage of new features in
    the 2.3.X series like nested forms and bundler support. That said, it's
    still good software, just really old and unsupported. I thought about
    upgrading it myself to 3.X but the undertaking is massive. Far simpler to
    implement spree and do a migration. Spree also has a far more complete
    feature set than substruct. Off the top of my head spree has the following
    major features that substruct does not:

    - zone support for shipping and taxes
    - a more flexible vairant system
    - support for many payment systems (versus just authorize.net and paypal
    standard)
    - google analytics/jirafe support
    - More shipping methods including active_shipping support (yes, I am
    counting official supported plugins as part of spree)
    - API
    - Much more sophisticated promotion system


    On Wednesday, May 27, 2009 12:43:02 PM UTC-4, Stephanie Powell wrote:

    I just googled "open source ecommerce" to get a list of ecommerce
    platforms. Here's one that mentions spree:

    http://www.sslmatic.com/blog/16-powerful-and-open-source-e-commerce-applications/



    Offhand, I would be able to spit out some facts on some ecomm platforms,
    such as:

    Magento: <a href="http://www.magentocommerce.com/">Magento</a> is
    written in PHP and is "dripping" with features according to one article.
    I recently helped out a friend who wanted to install this as I thought
    it was a good option for her to try to implement and play around with
    because it was rich with features and easy to use for someone with a
    very tiny programming background. Tunagami, one of the spree users,
    heard editing the Magento core is difficult and frustrating.

    <a href="http://www.oscommerce.com/">osCommerce</a>, <a
    href="http://www.zen-cart.com/">zenCart</a>: I group these two together,
    although they probably wouldn't appreciate that. They are both written
    in php. I don't know a whole lot about them except that everyone I know
    who has worked with them was not happy when they had to work with the
    code or customize anything.

    <a href="http://www.interspire.com/">Interspire</a>: At my previous
    company, they chose Interspire over osCommerce because it presented a
    cleaner abstraction b/w views and logic. It is written in php also. I
    didn't work with it too much, but what I did see was alright. My
    coworker implemented some customization and he said it was a bit of a
    struggle, but much less than osCommerce.

    <a href="http://www.icdevgroup.org/">Interchange</a>: Well, the <a
    href="http://www.endpoint.com/">End Point</a> folks are obviously biased
    to support Interchange. Interchange is written in perl. You can read a
    lot about it <a href="http://www.icdevgroup.org/i/dev/about">here</a>
    (features, security, etc). End Point has developed some pretty powerful
    multi-site Interchange based stores in addition to smaller simple out of
    the box ecomm sites.

    Wordpress / Joomla / Drupal Ecomm plugins: I've tried to install all
    these plugins for a client about a year ago. I was not happy with them.
    The wordpress ecomm plugin seemed very buggy. Perhaps they have improved
    over time. All of these CMS's are written in php.

    <a href="http://code.google.com/p/substruct/">Substruct</a>: This is an
    older rails ecomm platform. It is written in rails and implemented as a
    Rails Engine. As far as I can tell from the documentation, it offers two
    payment gateways (Authorize.net and PayPal), has some basic backend and
    cms, but is not listed as "extendable". Just looking at the demo,
    though, there is a Wishlist and Blog implemented in Substruct, which are
    perhaps valuable features.

    <a href="http://www.shopify.com/">Shopify</a> / <a
    href="http://bigcartel.com/">Big Cartel</a>: These are both hosted ecomm
    services. Big Cartel is free up to 100 products. Shopify is a paid
    service. From what I can tell, they are both decent -- obviously the
    limitations being the number of items you want to sell and the level of
    customization and features needed.



    So why choose Spree?

    Well, the first decision is whether or not you want a hosted ecomm
    service. As I said with Big Cartel, you are limited to 100 products.
    With Big Cartel and Shopify, your ability to customize the site features
    is limited. However, a hosted ecomm service may be a good fit for
    someone who doesn't want to deal with any programming, can shell out
    money (Shopify), or only has a small amount of products. The ability to
    customize the look & feel of both seems sufficient.

    If you've made it past this first decision and decide not to go with a
    hosted ecomm service, the second big decision is what language /
    platform should you use? Well, a lot of times that decision is
    influenced by the developer(s), budget (hosting for php is more
    wide-spread than rails hosting, a lot of hosting services have some php
    platforms built in to their hosting service), or time. PHP might be a
    good choice b/c a developer may be more familiar with getting it up and
    running with customization. The disadvantage to PHP, however, is that
    some people think the "code is messy" and that as far as I know, the php
    ecomm platforms listed above aren't implemented in MVC frameworks such
    as CakePHP (anyone correct me if I'm wrong), so the abstraction b/w the
    model (database interaction), view, and controller is lacking. I'm also
    not sure the level of OOP that is used in some of the PHP platforms
    mentioned. Personally, I don't mind PHP and I thought CakePHP was not
    bad to work with.

    A perl based ecomm platform might be a good choice for a site that needs
    to be powerful & robust. However, the disadvantage to perl is that it
    *may not be as easy to work with as php* and it may be hard to find Perl
    developers. I haven't worked with any perl ecomm platforms outside of
    Interchange, so I'm just not sure what the open source competition is
    out there.

    Finally, let's say you have a developer that is familiar with Rails, or
    a budget that would give some leeway in learning new technologies. I'm
    sure you can find lots of comments from the trendy Rails community on
    why to choose Rails and lots of comments from the Rails critics on why
    not to choose Rails - I won't go into that :) Of the two open source
    platforms I know in Rails (Substruct and Spree), Spree seems to have
    much more extendability, but Substruct might be a good fit for someone
    with very little customization required (maybe?). Spree would be a good
    choice for a developer who is comfortable extending and adding a
    customization where needed. Also as the Spree community grows, many new
    features continue to be developed. The goal of Spree is to be a solution
    that give a developer 90% of what they need -- the disadvantage to this
    marketing perspective though, is that it still needs to appeal not only
    to developers but to their clients as well. Spree has more payment
    gateways, a larger & more active community, and appears to be more
    extendable than Substruct. It also has some other features that make it
    stand out from Substruct (http://spreecommerce.com/features).


    I hope that helps. This input is based on my experiences and my opinions
    -- so others will have differing opinions :) I also only addressed open
    source solutions, which brings up another decision point.




    Spree.developper wrote:
    Hi,

    I am preparing my end of studies(i use Spree in my application e-
    commerce)
    Well ! so I'm preparing my folder, i will present Spree the day of my
    defense...

    I would be delighted if Spree or Users Spree have or could send me
    some documentation to defend the choice to use Spree, and if some
    graphic concept (UML) Spree.


    All my greetings and respect,thank you in advance.
    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Spree" group.
    To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/d/msg/spree-user/-/MlHcOWEA-K4J.
    To post to this group, send email to spree-user@googlegroups.com.
    To unsubscribe from this group, send email to spree-user+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
    For more options, visit this group at http://groups.google.com/group/spree-user?hl=en.
  • Steph Skardal at Dec 20, 2012 at 10:54 pm
    Hi,

    Looking back at the original email I wondered who wrote it and it was
    me, before I got married :)

    In the last year, End Point has also released Piggybak
    (http://www.piggybak.org/), a Rails based platform which runs on Rails
    3.2.8 and is heavily tied to RailsAdmin. I have yet to put together a
    thorough discussion about Spree vs. Substruct vs. Piggybak, but off the
    top of my head I will say that Piggybak evolved from working with
    Interchange and Spree over the last ~6 years, and harnesses End Point
    ecommerce expertise gained over many more years.

    As with any open source framework, there are pros and cons. The goal of
    Piggybak was to initially be a very simple mountable ecommerce solution
    intended to be mounted and provide cart and one-page checkout support
    with a RailsAdmin based admin. Since then, it has expanded to include
    many extensions simply due to the fact that it's a more valuable tool
    with more built out features. Spree is a full-featured platform that has
    great API support, a good promotion system, much better testing
    coverage, and advanced analytics support. The commonalities between them
    include active_shipping, active_merchant support, and variant support.

    Also, don't forget to include ror-e (ror-e.com), another Rails platform
    that evolved from the creator's time working with Spree. Off the top of
    my head, I believe ror-e has strengths in backend support such as
    inventory management and accounting integration.

    My company and any company, for that matter, will still likely be biased
    regarding what platform to use based on what they may be the most
    invested in and what tools they can efficiently use to build out
    functionality for clients.

    ~Steph


    On 12/20/2012 05:02 PM, Nate Lowrie wrote:
    I thought I would add a little bit about the Spree/Substruct comments.
    I have a substruct site that is 4 years old and am currently in the
    process of migrating my store. The main reason for switching was that
    Substruct is essentially abondonware. There hasn't been an update in
    over a year and the lists get maybe 1-2 posts a month. The latest
    edge is still on rails 2.3.10 and still hasn't been updated to take
    advantage of new features in the 2.3.X series like nested forms and
    bundler support. That said, it's still good software, just really old
    and unsupported. I thought about upgrading it myself to 3.X but the
    undertaking is massive. Far simpler to implement spree and do a
    migration. Spree also has a far more complete feature set than
    substruct. Off the top of my head spree has the following major
    features that substruct does not:

    * zone support for shipping and taxes
    * a more flexible vairant system
    * support for many payment systems (versus just authorize.net and
    paypal standard)
    * google analytics/jirafe support
    * More shipping methods including active_shipping support (yes, I am
    counting official supported plugins as part of spree)
    * API
    * Much more sophisticated promotion system



    On Wednesday, May 27, 2009 12:43:02 PM UTC-4, Stephanie Powell wrote:

    I just googled "open source ecommerce" to get a list of ecommerce
    platforms. Here's one that mentions spree:
    http://www.sslmatic.com/blog/16-powerful-and-open-source-e-commerce-applications/
    <http://www.sslmatic.com/blog/16-powerful-and-open-source-e-commerce-applications/>




    Offhand, I would be able to spit out some facts on some ecomm
    platforms,
    such as:

    Magento: <a href="http://www.magentocommerce.com/
    <http://www.magentocommerce.com/>">Magento</a> is
    written in PHP and is "dripping" with features according to one
    article.
    I recently helped out a friend who wanted to install this as I
    thought
    it was a good option for her to try to implement and play around with
    because it was rich with features and easy to use for someone with a
    very tiny programming background. Tunagami, one of the spree users,
    heard editing the Magento core is difficult and frustrating.

    <a href="http://www.oscommerce.com/
    <http://www.oscommerce.com/>">osCommerce</a>, <a
    href="http://www.zen-cart.com/">zenCart</a>: I group these two
    together,
    although they probably wouldn't appreciate that. They are both
    written
    in php. I don't know a whole lot about them except that everyone I
    know
    who has worked with them was not happy when they had to work with the
    code or customize anything.

    <a href="http://www.interspire.com/
    <http://www.interspire.com/>">Interspire</a>: At my previous
    company, they chose Interspire over osCommerce because it presented a
    cleaner abstraction b/w views and logic. It is written in php also. I
    didn't work with it too much, but what I did see was alright. My
    coworker implemented some customization and he said it was a bit of a
    struggle, but much less than osCommerce.

    <a href="http://www.icdevgroup.org/
    <http://www.icdevgroup.org/>">Interchange</a>: Well, the <a
    href="http://www.endpoint.com/">End Point</a> folks are obviously
    biased
    to support Interchange. Interchange is written in perl. You can
    read a
    lot about it <a href="http://www.icdevgroup.org/i/dev/about
    <http://www.icdevgroup.org/i/dev/about>">here</a>
    (features, security, etc). End Point has developed some pretty
    powerful
    multi-site Interchange based stores in addition to smaller simple
    out of
    the box ecomm sites.

    Wordpress / Joomla / Drupal Ecomm plugins: I've tried to install all
    these plugins for a client about a year ago. I was not happy with
    them.
    The wordpress ecomm plugin seemed very buggy. Perhaps they have
    improved
    over time. All of these CMS's are written in php.

    <a href="http://code.google.com/p/substruct/
    <http://code.google.com/p/substruct/>">Substruct</a>: This is an
    older rails ecomm platform. It is written in rails and implemented
    as a
    Rails Engine. As far as I can tell from the documentation, it
    offers two
    payment gateways (Authorize.net and PayPal), has some basic
    backend and
    cms, but is not listed as "extendable". Just looking at the demo,
    though, there is a Wishlist and Blog implemented in Substruct,
    which are
    perhaps valuable features.

    <a href="http://www.shopify.com/">Shopify</a> / <a
    href="http://bigcartel.com/">Big Cartel</a>: These are both hosted
    ecomm
    services. Big Cartel is free up to 100 products. Shopify is a paid
    service. From what I can tell, they are both decent -- obviously the
    limitations being the number of items you want to sell and the
    level of
    customization and features needed.



    So why choose Spree?

    Well, the first decision is whether or not you want a hosted ecomm
    service. As I said with Big Cartel, you are limited to 100 products.
    With Big Cartel and Shopify, your ability to customize the site
    features
    is limited. However, a hosted ecomm service may be a good fit for
    someone who doesn't want to deal with any programming, can shell out
    money (Shopify), or only has a small amount of products. The
    ability to
    customize the look & feel of both seems sufficient.

    If you've made it past this first decision and decide not to go
    with a
    hosted ecomm service, the second big decision is what language /
    platform should you use? Well, a lot of times that decision is
    influenced by the developer(s), budget (hosting for php is more
    wide-spread than rails hosting, a lot of hosting services have
    some php
    platforms built in to their hosting service), or time. PHP might be a
    good choice b/c a developer may be more familiar with getting it
    up and
    running with customization. The disadvantage to PHP, however, is that
    some people think the "code is messy" and that as far as I know,
    the php
    ecomm platforms listed above aren't implemented in MVC frameworks
    such
    as CakePHP (anyone correct me if I'm wrong), so the abstraction
    b/w the
    model (database interaction), view, and controller is lacking. I'm
    also
    not sure the level of OOP that is used in some of the PHP platforms
    mentioned. Personally, I don't mind PHP and I thought CakePHP was not
    bad to work with.

    A perl based ecomm platform might be a good choice for a site that
    needs
    to be powerful & robust. However, the disadvantage to perl is that it
    *may not be as easy to work with as php* and it may be hard to
    find Perl
    developers. I haven't worked with any perl ecomm platforms outside of
    Interchange, so I'm just not sure what the open source competition is
    out there.

    Finally, let's say you have a developer that is familiar with
    Rails, or
    a budget that would give some leeway in learning new technologies.
    I'm
    sure you can find lots of comments from the trendy Rails community on
    why to choose Rails and lots of comments from the Rails critics on
    why
    not to choose Rails - I won't go into that :) Of the two open source
    platforms I know in Rails (Substruct and Spree), Spree seems to have
    much more extendability, but Substruct might be a good fit for
    someone
    with very little customization required (maybe?). Spree would be a
    good
    choice for a developer who is comfortable extending and adding a
    customization where needed. Also as the Spree community grows,
    many new
    features continue to be developed. The goal of Spree is to be a
    solution
    that give a developer 90% of what they need -- the disadvantage to
    this
    marketing perspective though, is that it still needs to appeal not
    only
    to developers but to their clients as well. Spree has more payment
    gateways, a larger & more active community, and appears to be more
    extendable than Substruct. It also has some other features that
    make it
    stand out from Substruct (http://spreecommerce.com/features
    <http://spreecommerce.com/features>).


    I hope that helps. This input is based on my experiences and my
    opinions
    -- so others will have differing opinions :) I also only addressed
    open
    source solutions, which brings up another decision point.




    Spree.developper wrote:
    Hi,

    I am preparing my end of studies(i use Spree in my application e-
    commerce)
    Well ! so I'm preparing my folder, i will present Spree the day of my
    defense...

    I would be delighted if Spree or Users Spree have or could send me
    some documentation to defend the choice to use Spree, and if some
    graphic concept (UML) Spree.


    All my greetings and respect,thank you in advance.

    --
    Steph Skardal
    End Point, Corp

    (336) 939-6127
    steph@endpoint.com

    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Spree" group.
    To post to this group, send email to spree-user@googlegroups.com.
    To unsubscribe from this group, send email to spree-user+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
    For more options, visit this group at http://groups.google.com/group/spree-user?hl=en.

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