FAQ
Hello gophers,

I'd like to announce a tool I've been working on; it's available in the
form of a website.

It's just like godoc.org, but given an import path of any Go package, it
displays its *_source code_*.

http://gotools.org/

(2 minute screencast here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twjxYEubmzs)

You can already see source code of a Go package on github, etc., so why
this? Three main reasons:

    - It works on any valid Go package import path.


    - It doesn't matter if's hosted on GitHub or code.google.com, if it's a
       part of standard Go library, or if it uses a vanity import path. If you can go
       get it, you can see its source in the same place, e.g.:

       http://gotools.org/net/http
       http://gotools.org/rsc.io/pdf
       http://gotools.org/gopkg.in/pipe.v2
       http://gotools.org/github.com/shurcooL/gtdo


    - It supports "goto symbol" functionality, making navigation with
    keyboard only much faster/easier.


    - When you know what identifier you want to see, press Cmd+R (or just R
       in browsers that don't allow intercepting Cmd+R) to bring up a symbols
       view. This is inspired by Sublime Text and I wanted the same experience in
       this tool.

       Go symbol names are always unique, so this is an incredible way to
       navigate code. No need to search for NewRequest in net/http when you can
       *_lookup_*:

       http://gotools.org/net/http#NewRequest


    - It displays all .go files on one page.


    - Makes it easy to access entire Go package source at once and use Cmd+F
       to find something without having to know which .go file it's in.

Combined with a predictable URL scheme of gotools.org/import-path, the
entire site is very usable with keyboard only, which is great when you're
in the middle of development and just want to quickly get to somewhere.

It also supports viewing any branch or revision of a Go package. The query
parameter `rev` specifies it; there's a branch selector dropdown box at the
top. It's handy when you're in the middle of work and don't want to stash
your changes, check out another branch just to look something up.

---

I use godoc.org multiple times a day when I'm writing Go code. I find
myself in situations where I want to use gotools.org to look up some source
code of some Go package on some branch a few times a week. Not as often,
but it is useful when the need arises. Being able to jump to any symbol
with Cmd+R is really my most favorite feature, as well as ability to paste
import path in the URL and go there.

I want gotools.org to be the best tool for viewing Go package source code.
I'm continuing work to fill in remaining missing features. I want this to
become a helpful tool for the Go community, and if it can eventually be
accepted as part of Go project that'd be something I'm happy to do. If you
like the general idea behind it, improvement suggestions are welcome. It's
open source so you can play a role in making it better. If it's something
that adds complexity, open an issue first and discuss your proposal, as I
have limited resources to spend on maintenance. (As an implementation
detail, all frontend code is written in Go; there is no hand-written
JavaScript, and I want to keep it that way. I also want to keep the code as
short and simple as possible.)

It uses sourcegraph's awesome go-vcs and vcsstore libraries for accessing
underlying git/mercurial repos, and GopherJS for compiling frontend code.

Let me know what you think and how I can make it more useful!

--
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To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to golang-nuts+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
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Search Discussions

  • Chris Hines at Dec 21, 2014 at 4:30 am
    Nice work! That could be handy.

    How does it deal with build tags?

    Chris
    On Saturday, December 20, 2014 10:30:26 PM UTC-5, Dmitri Shuralyov wrote:

    Hello gophers,

    I'd like to announce a tool I've been working on; it's available in the
    form of a website.

    It's just like godoc.org, but given an import path of any Go package, it
    displays its *_source code_*.

    http://gotools.org/

    (2 minute screencast here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twjxYEubmzs)

    You can already see source code of a Go package on github, etc., so why
    this? Three main reasons:

    - It works on any valid Go package import path.


    - It doesn't matter if's hosted on GitHub or code.google.com, if it's
    a part of standard Go library, or if it uses a vanity import path. If you
    can go get it, you can see its source in the same place, e.g.:

    http://gotools.org/net/http
    http://gotools.org/rsc.io/pdf
    http://gotools.org/gopkg.in/pipe.v2
    http://gotools.org/github.com/shurcooL/gtdo


    - It supports "goto symbol" functionality, making navigation with
    keyboard only much faster/easier.


    - When you know what identifier you want to see, press Cmd+R (or just
    R in browsers that don't allow intercepting Cmd+R) to bring up a symbols
    view. This is inspired by Sublime Text and I wanted the same experience in
    this tool.

    Go symbol names are always unique, so this is an incredible way to
    navigate code. No need to search for NewRequest in net/http when you can
    *_lookup_*:

    http://gotools.org/net/http#NewRequest


    - It displays all .go files on one page.


    - Makes it easy to access entire Go package source at once and use
    Cmd+F to find something without having to know which .go file it's in.

    Combined with a predictable URL scheme of gotools.org/import-path, the
    entire site is very usable with keyboard only, which is great when you're
    in the middle of development and just want to quickly get to somewhere.

    It also supports viewing any branch or revision of a Go package. The query
    parameter `rev` specifies it; there's a branch selector dropdown box at the
    top. It's handy when you're in the middle of work and don't want to stash
    your changes, check out another branch just to look something up.

    ---

    I use godoc.org multiple times a day when I'm writing Go code. I find
    myself in situations where I want to use gotools.org to look up some
    source code of some Go package on some branch a few times a week. Not as
    often, but it is useful when the need arises. Being able to jump to any
    symbol with Cmd+R is really my most favorite feature, as well as ability to
    paste import path in the URL and go there.

    I want gotools.org to be the best tool for viewing Go package source
    code. I'm continuing work to fill in remaining missing features. I want
    this to become a helpful tool for the Go community, and if it can
    eventually be accepted as part of Go project that'd be something I'm happy
    to do. If you like the general idea behind it, improvement suggestions are
    welcome. It's open source so you can play a role in making it better. If
    it's something that adds complexity, open an issue first and discuss your
    proposal, as I have limited resources to spend on maintenance. (As an
    implementation detail, all frontend code is written in Go; there is no
    hand-written JavaScript, and I want to keep it that way. I also want to
    keep the code as short and simple as possible.)

    It uses sourcegraph's awesome go-vcs and vcsstore libraries for accessing
    underlying git/mercurial repos, and GopherJS for compiling frontend code.

    Let me know what you think and how I can make it more useful!
    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "golang-nuts" group.
    To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to golang-nuts+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
    For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
  • Dmitri Shuralyov at Dec 21, 2014 at 4:39 am
    Thanks!

    Originally, I did not do anything special about build tags, so the defaults
    were used (linux, go1.4, etc.). Three days ago I changed it
    <https://github.com/shurcooL/gtdo/commit/a1f48e9174707882a3389b9153c131824c889247>
    to ignore build tags and always display all .go files, as that's a better
    default.

    So now you can actually see the _darwin.go file of this
    package: http://gotools.org/github.com/shurcooL/go/trash#main-darwin-go

    In the future, I might add more control over which files are displayed. For
    example, I can add a checkbox to include _test.go files, and similarly some
    way of specifying build tags and filtering out all non-matching packages.

    On Saturday, December 20, 2014 8:30:00 PM UTC-8, Chris Hines wrote:

    Nice work! That could be handy.

    How does it deal with build tags?

    Chris
    On Saturday, December 20, 2014 10:30:26 PM UTC-5, Dmitri Shuralyov wrote:

    Hello gophers,

    I'd like to announce a tool I've been working on; it's available in the
    form of a website.

    It's just like godoc.org, but given an import path of any Go package, it
    displays its *_source code_*.

    http://gotools.org/

    (2 minute screencast here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twjxYEubmzs)

    You can already see source code of a Go package on github, etc., so why
    this? Three main reasons:

    - It works on any valid Go package import path.


    - It doesn't matter if's hosted on GitHub or code.google.com, if it's
    a part of standard Go library, or if it uses a vanity import path. If you
    can go get it, you can see its source in the same place, e.g.:

    http://gotools.org/net/http
    http://gotools.org/rsc.io/pdf
    http://gotools.org/gopkg.in/pipe.v2
    http://gotools.org/github.com/shurcooL/gtdo


    - It supports "goto symbol" functionality, making navigation with
    keyboard only much faster/easier.


    - When you know what identifier you want to see, press Cmd+R (or just
    R in browsers that don't allow intercepting Cmd+R) to bring up a symbols
    view. This is inspired by Sublime Text and I wanted the same experience in
    this tool.

    Go symbol names are always unique, so this is an incredible way to
    navigate code. No need to search for NewRequest in net/http when you can
    *_lookup_*:

    http://gotools.org/net/http#NewRequest


    - It displays all .go files on one page.


    - Makes it easy to access entire Go package source at once and use
    Cmd+F to find something without having to know which .go file it's in.

    Combined with a predictable URL scheme of gotools.org/import-path, the
    entire site is very usable with keyboard only, which is great when you're
    in the middle of development and just want to quickly get to somewhere.

    It also supports viewing any branch or revision of a Go package. The
    query parameter `rev` specifies it; there's a branch selector dropdown box
    at the top. It's handy when you're in the middle of work and don't want to
    stash your changes, check out another branch just to look something up.

    ---

    I use godoc.org multiple times a day when I'm writing Go code. I find
    myself in situations where I want to use gotools.org to look up some
    source code of some Go package on some branch a few times a week. Not as
    often, but it is useful when the need arises. Being able to jump to any
    symbol with Cmd+R is really my most favorite feature, as well as ability to
    paste import path in the URL and go there.

    I want gotools.org to be the best tool for viewing Go package source
    code. I'm continuing work to fill in remaining missing features. I want
    this to become a helpful tool for the Go community, and if it can
    eventually be accepted as part of Go project that'd be something I'm happy
    to do. If you like the general idea behind it, improvement suggestions are
    welcome. It's open source so you can play a role in making it better. If
    it's something that adds complexity, open an issue first and discuss your
    proposal, as I have limited resources to spend on maintenance. (As an
    implementation detail, all frontend code is written in Go; there is no
    hand-written JavaScript, and I want to keep it that way. I also want to
    keep the code as short and simple as possible.)

    It uses sourcegraph's awesome go-vcs and vcsstore libraries for accessing
    underlying git/mercurial repos, and GopherJS for compiling frontend code.

    Let me know what you think and how I can make it more useful!
    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "golang-nuts" group.
    To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to golang-nuts+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
    For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
  • Chris Hines at Dec 21, 2014 at 4:48 am
    That sounds like a good approach, but I wonder if it is working correctly.

    I don't see any _windows.go files in http://gotools.org/syscall
    or http://gotools.org/os

    Although I do see some in http://gotools.org/code.google.com/p/odbc/api
    and http://gotools.org/bitbucket.org/kardianos/service.

    Maybe it doesn't work as intended for the standard library.

    Chris
    On Saturday, December 20, 2014 11:39:29 PM UTC-5, Dmitri Shuralyov wrote:

    Thanks!

    Originally, I did not do anything special about build tags, so the
    defaults were used (linux, go1.4, etc.). Three days ago I changed it
    <https://github.com/shurcooL/gtdo/commit/a1f48e9174707882a3389b9153c131824c889247>
    to ignore build tags and always display all .go files, as that's a better
    default.

    So now you can actually see the _darwin.go file of this package:
    http://gotools.org/github.com/shurcooL/go/trash#main-darwin-go

    In the future, I might add more control over which files are displayed.
    For example, I can add a checkbox to include _test.go files, and similarly
    some way of specifying build tags and filtering out all non-matching
    packages.

    On Saturday, December 20, 2014 8:30:00 PM UTC-8, Chris Hines wrote:

    Nice work! That could be handy.

    How does it deal with build tags?

    Chris
    On Saturday, December 20, 2014 10:30:26 PM UTC-5, Dmitri Shuralyov wrote:

    Hello gophers,

    I'd like to announce a tool I've been working on; it's available in the
    form of a website.

    It's just like godoc.org, but given an import path of any Go package,
    it displays its *_source code_*.

    http://gotools.org/

    (2 minute screencast here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twjxYEubmzs)

    You can already see source code of a Go package on github, etc., so why
    this? Three main reasons:

    - It works on any valid Go package import path.


    - It doesn't matter if's hosted on GitHub or code.google.com, if
    it's a part of standard Go library, or if it uses a vanity import path. If
    you can go get it, you can see its source in the same place, e.g.:

    http://gotools.org/net/http
    http://gotools.org/rsc.io/pdf
    http://gotools.org/gopkg.in/pipe.v2
    http://gotools.org/github.com/shurcooL/gtdo


    - It supports "goto symbol" functionality, making navigation with
    keyboard only much faster/easier.


    - When you know what identifier you want to see, press Cmd+R (or
    just R in browsers that don't allow intercepting Cmd+R) to bring up a
    symbols view. This is inspired by Sublime Text and I wanted the same
    experience in this tool.

    Go symbol names are always unique, so this is an incredible way
    to navigate code. No need to search for NewRequest in net/http when you can
    *_lookup_*:

    http://gotools.org/net/http#NewRequest


    - It displays all .go files on one page.


    - Makes it easy to access entire Go package source at once and use
    Cmd+F to find something without having to know which .go file it's in.

    Combined with a predictable URL scheme of gotools.org/import-path, the
    entire site is very usable with keyboard only, which is great when you're
    in the middle of development and just want to quickly get to somewhere.

    It also supports viewing any branch or revision of a Go package. The
    query parameter `rev` specifies it; there's a branch selector dropdown box
    at the top. It's handy when you're in the middle of work and don't want to
    stash your changes, check out another branch just to look something up.

    ---

    I use godoc.org multiple times a day when I'm writing Go code. I find
    myself in situations where I want to use gotools.org to look up some
    source code of some Go package on some branch a few times a week. Not as
    often, but it is useful when the need arises. Being able to jump to any
    symbol with Cmd+R is really my most favorite feature, as well as ability to
    paste import path in the URL and go there.

    I want gotools.org to be the best tool for viewing Go package source
    code. I'm continuing work to fill in remaining missing features. I want
    this to become a helpful tool for the Go community, and if it can
    eventually be accepted as part of Go project that'd be something I'm happy
    to do. If you like the general idea behind it, improvement suggestions are
    welcome. It's open source so you can play a role in making it better. If
    it's something that adds complexity, open an issue first and discuss your
    proposal, as I have limited resources to spend on maintenance. (As an
    implementation detail, all frontend code is written in Go; there is no
    hand-written JavaScript, and I want to keep it that way. I also want to
    keep the code as short and simple as possible.)

    It uses sourcegraph's awesome go-vcs and vcsstore libraries for
    accessing underlying git/mercurial repos, and GopherJS for compiling
    frontend code.

    Let me know what you think and how I can make it more useful!
    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "golang-nuts" group.
    To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to golang-nuts+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
    For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
  • Dmitri Shuralyov at Dec 21, 2014 at 4:56 am
    Yeah, sorry, it's just not implemented for standard library yet, as the
    TODO comment in that commit mentions. :P

    https://github.com/shurcooL/gtdo/commit/a1f48e9174707882a3389b9153c131824c889247

    I will fix that soon.

    On Saturday, December 20, 2014 8:47:58 PM UTC-8, Chris Hines wrote:

    That sounds like a good approach, but I wonder if it is working correctly.

    I don't see any _windows.go files in http://gotools.org/syscall or
    http://gotools.org/os

    Although I do see some in http://gotools.org/code.google.com/p/odbc/api
    and http://gotools.org/bitbucket.org/kardianos/service.

    Maybe it doesn't work as intended for the standard library.

    Chris
    On Saturday, December 20, 2014 11:39:29 PM UTC-5, Dmitri Shuralyov wrote:

    Thanks!

    Originally, I did not do anything special about build tags, so the
    defaults were used (linux, go1.4, etc.). Three days ago I changed it
    <https://github.com/shurcooL/gtdo/commit/a1f48e9174707882a3389b9153c131824c889247>
    to ignore build tags and always display all .go files, as that's a better
    default.

    So now you can actually see the _darwin.go file of this package:
    http://gotools.org/github.com/shurcooL/go/trash#main-darwin-go

    In the future, I might add more control over which files are displayed.
    For example, I can add a checkbox to include _test.go files, and similarly
    some way of specifying build tags and filtering out all non-matching
    packages.

    On Saturday, December 20, 2014 8:30:00 PM UTC-8, Chris Hines wrote:

    Nice work! That could be handy.

    How does it deal with build tags?

    Chris
    On Saturday, December 20, 2014 10:30:26 PM UTC-5, Dmitri Shuralyov wrote:

    Hello gophers,

    I'd like to announce a tool I've been working on; it's available in the
    form of a website.

    It's just like godoc.org, but given an import path of any Go package,
    it displays its *_source code_*.

    http://gotools.org/

    (2 minute screencast here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twjxYEubmzs)

    You can already see source code of a Go package on github, etc., so why
    this? Three main reasons:

    - It works on any valid Go package import path.


    - It doesn't matter if's hosted on GitHub or code.google.com, if
    it's a part of standard Go library, or if it uses a vanity import path. If
    you can go get it, you can see its source in the same place,
    e.g.:

    http://gotools.org/net/http
    http://gotools.org/rsc.io/pdf
    http://gotools.org/gopkg.in/pipe.v2
    http://gotools.org/github.com/shurcooL/gtdo


    - It supports "goto symbol" functionality, making navigation with
    keyboard only much faster/easier.


    - When you know what identifier you want to see, press Cmd+R (or
    just R in browsers that don't allow intercepting Cmd+R) to bring up a
    symbols view. This is inspired by Sublime Text and I wanted the same
    experience in this tool.

    Go symbol names are always unique, so this is an incredible way
    to navigate code. No need to search for NewRequest in net/http when you can
    *_lookup_*:

    http://gotools.org/net/http#NewRequest


    - It displays all .go files on one page.


    - Makes it easy to access entire Go package source at once and use
    Cmd+F to find something without having to know which .go file it's in.

    Combined with a predictable URL scheme of gotools.org/import-path, the
    entire site is very usable with keyboard only, which is great when you're
    in the middle of development and just want to quickly get to somewhere.

    It also supports viewing any branch or revision of a Go package. The
    query parameter `rev` specifies it; there's a branch selector dropdown box
    at the top. It's handy when you're in the middle of work and don't want to
    stash your changes, check out another branch just to look something up.

    ---

    I use godoc.org multiple times a day when I'm writing Go code. I find
    myself in situations where I want to use gotools.org to look up some
    source code of some Go package on some branch a few times a week. Not as
    often, but it is useful when the need arises. Being able to jump to any
    symbol with Cmd+R is really my most favorite feature, as well as ability to
    paste import path in the URL and go there.

    I want gotools.org to be the best tool for viewing Go package source
    code. I'm continuing work to fill in remaining missing features. I want
    this to become a helpful tool for the Go community, and if it can
    eventually be accepted as part of Go project that'd be something I'm happy
    to do. If you like the general idea behind it, improvement suggestions are
    welcome. It's open source so you can play a role in making it better. If
    it's something that adds complexity, open an issue first and discuss your
    proposal, as I have limited resources to spend on maintenance. (As an
    implementation detail, all frontend code is written in Go; there is no
    hand-written JavaScript, and I want to keep it that way. I also want to
    keep the code as short and simple as possible.)

    It uses sourcegraph's awesome go-vcs and vcsstore libraries for
    accessing underlying git/mercurial repos, and GopherJS for compiling
    frontend code.

    Let me know what you think and how I can make it more useful!
    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "golang-nuts" group.
    To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to golang-nuts+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
    For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
  • Dmitri Shuralyov at Dec 21, 2014 at 9:25 am
    I've closed that issue (https://github.com/shurcooL/gtdo/issues/13), but
    uncovered another.

    Namely, I'm using go/build.Context.Import to get information about the
    package. When I set UseAllFiles to true, it may result in Import returning
    early with an incomplete package (not all .go files listed) and
    a MultiplePackageError.

    Returning an error early makes sense when UseAllFiles is false, since that
    means the package is really invalid. But when UseAllFiles is true, an
    otherwise valid package may have multiple package names (imagine a library
    that uses go generate and has a command - package main - behind an //
    +build ignore build tag).

    I wonder if there's still some way to use build.Import with UseAllFiles
    true to get the complete package... That's
    issue https://github.com/shurcooL/gtdo/issues/18 now.

    On Saturday, December 20, 2014 8:56:36 PM UTC-8, Dmitri Shuralyov wrote:

    Yeah, sorry, it's just not implemented for standard library yet, as the
    TODO comment in that commit mentions. :P


    https://github.com/shurcooL/gtdo/commit/a1f48e9174707882a3389b9153c131824c889247

    I will fix that soon.

    On Saturday, December 20, 2014 8:47:58 PM UTC-8, Chris Hines wrote:

    That sounds like a good approach, but I wonder if it is working correctly.

    I don't see any _windows.go files in http://gotools.org/syscall or
    http://gotools.org/os

    Although I do see some in http://gotools.org/code.google.com/p/odbc/api
    and http://gotools.org/bitbucket.org/kardianos/service.

    Maybe it doesn't work as intended for the standard library.

    Chris
    On Saturday, December 20, 2014 11:39:29 PM UTC-5, Dmitri Shuralyov wrote:

    Thanks!

    Originally, I did not do anything special about build tags, so the
    defaults were used (linux, go1.4, etc.). Three days ago I changed it
    <https://github.com/shurcooL/gtdo/commit/a1f48e9174707882a3389b9153c131824c889247>
    to ignore build tags and always display all .go files, as that's a better
    default.

    So now you can actually see the _darwin.go file of this package:
    http://gotools.org/github.com/shurcooL/go/trash#main-darwin-go

    In the future, I might add more control over which files are displayed.
    For example, I can add a checkbox to include _test.go files, and similarly
    some way of specifying build tags and filtering out all non-matching
    packages.

    On Saturday, December 20, 2014 8:30:00 PM UTC-8, Chris Hines wrote:

    Nice work! That could be handy.

    How does it deal with build tags?

    Chris

    On Saturday, December 20, 2014 10:30:26 PM UTC-5, Dmitri Shuralyov
    wrote:
    Hello gophers,

    I'd like to announce a tool I've been working on; it's available in
    the form of a website.

    It's just like godoc.org, but given an import path of any Go package,
    it displays its *_source code_*.

    http://gotools.org/

    (2 minute screencast here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twjxYEubmzs
    )

    You can already see source code of a Go package on github, etc., so
    why this? Three main reasons:

    - It works on any valid Go package import path.


    - It doesn't matter if's hosted on GitHub or code.google.com, if
    it's a part of standard Go library, or if it uses a vanity import path. If
    you can go get it, you can see its source in the same place,
    e.g.:

    http://gotools.org/net/http
    http://gotools.org/rsc.io/pdf
    http://gotools.org/gopkg.in/pipe.v2
    http://gotools.org/github.com/shurcooL/gtdo


    - It supports "goto symbol" functionality, making navigation with
    keyboard only much faster/easier.


    - When you know what identifier you want to see, press Cmd+R (or
    just R in browsers that don't allow intercepting Cmd+R) to bring up a
    symbols view. This is inspired by Sublime Text and I wanted the same
    experience in this tool.

    Go symbol names are always unique, so this is an incredible way
    to navigate code. No need to search for NewRequest in net/http when you can
    *_lookup_*:

    http://gotools.org/net/http#NewRequest


    - It displays all .go files on one page.


    - Makes it easy to access entire Go package source at once and use
    Cmd+F to find something without having to know which .go file it's in.

    Combined with a predictable URL scheme of gotools.org/import-path,
    the entire site is very usable with keyboard only, which is great when
    you're in the middle of development and just want to quickly get to
    somewhere.

    It also supports viewing any branch or revision of a Go package. The
    query parameter `rev` specifies it; there's a branch selector dropdown box
    at the top. It's handy when you're in the middle of work and don't want to
    stash your changes, check out another branch just to look something up.

    ---

    I use godoc.org multiple times a day when I'm writing Go code. I find
    myself in situations where I want to use gotools.org to look up some
    source code of some Go package on some branch a few times a week. Not as
    often, but it is useful when the need arises. Being able to jump to any
    symbol with Cmd+R is really my most favorite feature, as well as ability to
    paste import path in the URL and go there.

    I want gotools.org to be the best tool for viewing Go package source
    code. I'm continuing work to fill in remaining missing features. I want
    this to become a helpful tool for the Go community, and if it can
    eventually be accepted as part of Go project that'd be something I'm happy
    to do. If you like the general idea behind it, improvement suggestions are
    welcome. It's open source so you can play a role in making it better. If
    it's something that adds complexity, open an issue first and discuss your
    proposal, as I have limited resources to spend on maintenance. (As an
    implementation detail, all frontend code is written in Go; there is no
    hand-written JavaScript, and I want to keep it that way. I also want to
    keep the code as short and simple as possible.)

    It uses sourcegraph's awesome go-vcs and vcsstore libraries for
    accessing underlying git/mercurial repos, and GopherJS for compiling
    frontend code.

    Let me know what you think and how I can make it more useful!
    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "golang-nuts" group.
    To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to golang-nuts+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
    For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
  • Stephen Gutekanst at Dec 21, 2014 at 10:15 am
    Really great to see an announcement on this!

    I was suprised you can capture command+r in the browser.. o.O it seems to
    work fine even on Ubuntu though.

    I wonder if symbol lookup (command+r) could have each symbol prefixed with
    it's type name? e.g. visiting a package I found eight or so `String`
    methods for different types, they were presented as:


        - String
        - String
        - String
        - String
        - etc

    Versus (if it can be done)


        - Foo.String
        - Bar.String
        - A.String
        - String (not a receiver function, so no type prefix)
        - etc

    Spectacular work on this! I really like it.

    - Stephen
    On Saturday, December 20, 2014 8:30:26 PM UTC-7, Dmitri Shuralyov wrote:

    Hello gophers,

    I'd like to announce a tool I've been working on; it's available in the
    form of a website.

    It's just like godoc.org, but given an import path of any Go package, it
    displays its *_source code_*.

    http://gotools.org/

    (2 minute screencast here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twjxYEubmzs)

    You can already see source code of a Go package on github, etc., so why
    this? Three main reasons:

    - It works on any valid Go package import path.


    - It doesn't matter if's hosted on GitHub or code.google.com, if it's
    a part of standard Go library, or if it uses a vanity import path. If you
    can go get it, you can see its source in the same place, e.g.:

    http://gotools.org/net/http
    http://gotools.org/rsc.io/pdf
    http://gotools.org/gopkg.in/pipe.v2
    http://gotools.org/github.com/shurcooL/gtdo


    - It supports "goto symbol" functionality, making navigation with
    keyboard only much faster/easier.


    - When you know what identifier you want to see, press Cmd+R (or just
    R in browsers that don't allow intercepting Cmd+R) to bring up a symbols
    view. This is inspired by Sublime Text and I wanted the same experience in
    this tool.

    Go symbol names are always unique, so this is an incredible way to
    navigate code. No need to search for NewRequest in net/http when you can
    *_lookup_*:

    http://gotools.org/net/http#NewRequest


    - It displays all .go files on one page.


    - Makes it easy to access entire Go package source at once and use
    Cmd+F to find something without having to know which .go file it's in.

    Combined with a predictable URL scheme of gotools.org/import-path, the
    entire site is very usable with keyboard only, which is great when you're
    in the middle of development and just want to quickly get to somewhere.

    It also supports viewing any branch or revision of a Go package. The query
    parameter `rev` specifies it; there's a branch selector dropdown box at the
    top. It's handy when you're in the middle of work and don't want to stash
    your changes, check out another branch just to look something up.

    ---

    I use godoc.org multiple times a day when I'm writing Go code. I find
    myself in situations where I want to use gotools.org to look up some
    source code of some Go package on some branch a few times a week. Not as
    often, but it is useful when the need arises. Being able to jump to any
    symbol with Cmd+R is really my most favorite feature, as well as ability to
    paste import path in the URL and go there.

    I want gotools.org to be the best tool for viewing Go package source
    code. I'm continuing work to fill in remaining missing features. I want
    this to become a helpful tool for the Go community, and if it can
    eventually be accepted as part of Go project that'd be something I'm happy
    to do. If you like the general idea behind it, improvement suggestions are
    welcome. It's open source so you can play a role in making it better. If
    it's something that adds complexity, open an issue first and discuss your
    proposal, as I have limited resources to spend on maintenance. (As an
    implementation detail, all frontend code is written in Go; there is no
    hand-written JavaScript, and I want to keep it that way. I also want to
    keep the code as short and simple as possible.)

    It uses sourcegraph's awesome go-vcs and vcsstore libraries for accessing
    underlying git/mercurial repos, and GopherJS for compiling frontend code.

    Let me know what you think and how I can make it more useful!
    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "golang-nuts" group.
    To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to golang-nuts+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
    For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
  • Dmitri Shuralyov at Dec 21, 2014 at 11:21 am
    Hey Stephen, thanks!

    That's a great suggestion about prefixing method names with their type!

    In fact, I already have that partially working for anchor names/permalinks,
    as you can see with these examples:

    http://gotools.org/go/ast#Ident.String
    http://gotools.org/go/ast#CommentMap.String
    http://gotools.org/go/ast#Scope.String
    http://gotools.org/go/ast#ObjKind.String

    However, all 4 of those methods show up as just "String" in the symbols
    view for now. I've made issue #20
    <https://github.com/shurcooL/gtdo/issues/20> and will improve this!

    On Sunday, December 21, 2014 2:15:55 AM UTC-8, Stephen Gutekanst wrote:

    Really great to see an announcement on this!

    I was suprised you can capture command+r in the browser.. o.O it seems to
    work fine even on Ubuntu though.

    I wonder if symbol lookup (command+r) could have each symbol prefixed with
    it's type name? e.g. visiting a package I found eight or so `String`
    methods for different types, they were presented as:


    - String
    - String
    - String
    - String
    - etc

    Versus (if it can be done)


    - Foo.String
    - Bar.String
    - A.String
    - String (not a receiver function, so no type prefix)
    - etc

    Spectacular work on this! I really like it.

    - Stephen
    On Saturday, December 20, 2014 8:30:26 PM UTC-7, Dmitri Shuralyov wrote:

    Hello gophers,

    I'd like to announce a tool I've been working on; it's available in the
    form of a website.

    It's just like godoc.org, but given an import path of any Go package, it
    displays its *_source code_*.

    http://gotools.org/

    (2 minute screencast here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twjxYEubmzs)

    You can already see source code of a Go package on github, etc., so why
    this? Three main reasons:

    - It works on any valid Go package import path.


    - It doesn't matter if's hosted on GitHub or code.google.com, if it's
    a part of standard Go library, or if it uses a vanity import path. If you
    can go get it, you can see its source in the same place, e.g.:

    http://gotools.org/net/http
    http://gotools.org/rsc.io/pdf
    http://gotools.org/gopkg.in/pipe.v2
    http://gotools.org/github.com/shurcooL/gtdo


    - It supports "goto symbol" functionality, making navigation with
    keyboard only much faster/easier.


    - When you know what identifier you want to see, press Cmd+R (or just
    R in browsers that don't allow intercepting Cmd+R) to bring up a symbols
    view. This is inspired by Sublime Text and I wanted the same experience in
    this tool.

    Go symbol names are always unique, so this is an incredible way to
    navigate code. No need to search for NewRequest in net/http when you can
    *_lookup_*:

    http://gotools.org/net/http#NewRequest


    - It displays all .go files on one page.


    - Makes it easy to access entire Go package source at once and use
    Cmd+F to find something without having to know which .go file it's in.

    Combined with a predictable URL scheme of gotools.org/import-path, the
    entire site is very usable with keyboard only, which is great when you're
    in the middle of development and just want to quickly get to somewhere.

    It also supports viewing any branch or revision of a Go package. The
    query parameter `rev` specifies it; there's a branch selector dropdown box
    at the top. It's handy when you're in the middle of work and don't want to
    stash your changes, check out another branch just to look something up.

    ---

    I use godoc.org multiple times a day when I'm writing Go code. I find
    myself in situations where I want to use gotools.org to look up some
    source code of some Go package on some branch a few times a week. Not as
    often, but it is useful when the need arises. Being able to jump to any
    symbol with Cmd+R is really my most favorite feature, as well as ability to
    paste import path in the URL and go there.

    I want gotools.org to be the best tool for viewing Go package source
    code. I'm continuing work to fill in remaining missing features. I want
    this to become a helpful tool for the Go community, and if it can
    eventually be accepted as part of Go project that'd be something I'm happy
    to do. If you like the general idea behind it, improvement suggestions are
    welcome. It's open source so you can play a role in making it better. If
    it's something that adds complexity, open an issue first and discuss your
    proposal, as I have limited resources to spend on maintenance. (As an
    implementation detail, all frontend code is written in Go; there is no
    hand-written JavaScript, and I want to keep it that way. I also want to
    keep the code as short and simple as possible.)

    It uses sourcegraph's awesome go-vcs and vcsstore libraries for accessing
    underlying git/mercurial repos, and GopherJS for compiling frontend code.

    Let me know what you think and how I can make it more useful!
    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "golang-nuts" group.
    To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to golang-nuts+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
    For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
  • Dobrosław Żybort at Dec 21, 2014 at 10:24 am
    Hi,

    very nice site.

    One question: by Cmd+R you mean Ctrl+R on Linux? I have Linux Mint 17 and
    Firefox 34 and Ctrl+R simply reload page. Pushing R also does nothing, also
    no errors in browser console.

    W dniu niedziela, 21 grudnia 2014 04:30:26 UTC+1 użytkownik Dmitri
    Shuralyov napisał:
    Hello gophers,

    I'd like to announce a tool I've been working on; it's available in the
    form of a website.

    It's just like godoc.org, but given an import path of any Go package, it
    displays its *_source code_*.

    http://gotools.org/

    (2 minute screencast here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twjxYEubmzs)

    You can already see source code of a Go package on github, etc., so why
    this? Three main reasons:

    - It works on any valid Go package import path.


    - It doesn't matter if's hosted on GitHub or code.google.com, if it's
    a part of standard Go library, or if it uses a vanity import path. If you
    can go get it, you can see its source in the same place, e.g.:

    http://gotools.org/net/http
    http://gotools.org/rsc.io/pdf
    http://gotools.org/gopkg.in/pipe.v2
    http://gotools.org/github.com/shurcooL/gtdo


    - It supports "goto symbol" functionality, making navigation with
    keyboard only much faster/easier.


    - When you know what identifier you want to see, press Cmd+R (or just
    R in browsers that don't allow intercepting Cmd+R) to bring up a symbols
    view. This is inspired by Sublime Text and I wanted the same experience in
    this tool.

    Go symbol names are always unique, so this is an incredible way to
    navigate code. No need to search for NewRequest in net/http when you can
    *_lookup_*:

    http://gotools.org/net/http#NewRequest


    - It displays all .go files on one page.


    - Makes it easy to access entire Go package source at once and use
    Cmd+F to find something without having to know which .go file it's in.

    Combined with a predictable URL scheme of gotools.org/import-path, the
    entire site is very usable with keyboard only, which is great when you're
    in the middle of development and just want to quickly get to somewhere.

    It also supports viewing any branch or revision of a Go package. The query
    parameter `rev` specifies it; there's a branch selector dropdown box at the
    top. It's handy when you're in the middle of work and don't want to stash
    your changes, check out another branch just to look something up.

    ---

    I use godoc.org multiple times a day when I'm writing Go code. I find
    myself in situations where I want to use gotools.org to look up some
    source code of some Go package on some branch a few times a week. Not as
    often, but it is useful when the need arises. Being able to jump to any
    symbol with Cmd+R is really my most favorite feature, as well as ability to
    paste import path in the URL and go there.

    I want gotools.org to be the best tool for viewing Go package source
    code. I'm continuing work to fill in remaining missing features. I want
    this to become a helpful tool for the Go community, and if it can
    eventually be accepted as part of Go project that'd be something I'm happy
    to do. If you like the general idea behind it, improvement suggestions are
    welcome. It's open source so you can play a role in making it better. If
    it's something that adds complexity, open an issue first and discuss your
    proposal, as I have limited resources to spend on maintenance. (As an
    implementation detail, all frontend code is written in Go; there is no
    hand-written JavaScript, and I want to keep it that way. I also want to
    keep the code as short and simple as possible.)

    It uses sourcegraph's awesome go-vcs and vcsstore libraries for accessing
    underlying git/mercurial repos, and GopherJS for compiling frontend code.

    Let me know what you think and how I can make it more useful!
    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "golang-nuts" group.
    To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to golang-nuts+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
    For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
  • Stephen Gutekanst at Dec 21, 2014 at 11:14 am
    by Cmd+R you mean Ctrl+R on Linux? I have Linux Mint 17 and Firefox 34
    and Ctrl+R simply reload page. Pushing R also does nothing, also no errors
    in browser console.

    Command on OS X is equivalent to your Windows Logo key / System key / Linux
    key. It is typically between ctrl and alt keys.
    On Sun, Dec 21, 2014 at 3:24 AM, Dobrosław Żybort wrote:

    Hi,

    very nice site.

    One question: by Cmd+R you mean Ctrl+R on Linux? I have Linux Mint 17 and
    Firefox 34 and Ctrl+R simply reload page. Pushing R also does nothing,
    also no errors in browser console.

    W dniu niedziela, 21 grudnia 2014 04:30:26 UTC+1 użytkownik Dmitri
    Shuralyov napisał:
    Hello gophers,

    I'd like to announce a tool I've been working on; it's available in the
    form of a website.

    It's just like godoc.org, but given an import path of any Go package, it
    displays its *_source code_*.

    http://gotools.org/

    (2 minute screencast here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twjxYEubmzs)

    You can already see source code of a Go package on github, etc., so why
    this? Three main reasons:

    - It works on any valid Go package import path.


    - It doesn't matter if's hosted on GitHub or code.google.com, if it's
    a part of standard Go library, or if it uses a vanity import path. If you
    can go get it, you can see its source in the same place, e.g.:

    http://gotools.org/net/http
    http://gotools.org/rsc.io/pdf
    http://gotools.org/gopkg.in/pipe.v2
    http://gotools.org/github.com/shurcooL/gtdo


    - It supports "goto symbol" functionality, making navigation with
    keyboard only much faster/easier.


    - When you know what identifier you want to see, press Cmd+R (or just
    R in browsers that don't allow intercepting Cmd+R) to bring up a symbols
    view. This is inspired by Sublime Text and I wanted the same experience in
    this tool.

    Go symbol names are always unique, so this is an incredible way to
    navigate code. No need to search for NewRequest in net/http when you can
    *_lookup_*:

    http://gotools.org/net/http#NewRequest


    - It displays all .go files on one page.


    - Makes it easy to access entire Go package source at once and use
    Cmd+F to find something without having to know which .go file it's in.

    Combined with a predictable URL scheme of gotools.org/import-path, the
    entire site is very usable with keyboard only, which is great when you're
    in the middle of development and just want to quickly get to somewhere.

    It also supports viewing any branch or revision of a Go package. The
    query parameter `rev` specifies it; there's a branch selector dropdown box
    at the top. It's handy when you're in the middle of work and don't want to
    stash your changes, check out another branch just to look something up.

    ---

    I use godoc.org multiple times a day when I'm writing Go code. I find
    myself in situations where I want to use gotools.org to look up some
    source code of some Go package on some branch a few times a week. Not as
    often, but it is useful when the need arises. Being able to jump to any
    symbol with Cmd+R is really my most favorite feature, as well as ability to
    paste import path in the URL and go there.

    I want gotools.org to be the best tool for viewing Go package source
    code. I'm continuing work to fill in remaining missing features. I want
    this to become a helpful tool for the Go community, and if it can
    eventually be accepted as part of Go project that'd be something I'm happy
    to do. If you like the general idea behind it, improvement suggestions are
    welcome. It's open source so you can play a role in making it better. If
    it's something that adds complexity, open an issue first and discuss your
    proposal, as I have limited resources to spend on maintenance. (As an
    implementation detail, all frontend code is written in Go; there is no
    hand-written JavaScript, and I want to keep it that way. I also want to
    keep the code as short and simple as possible.)

    It uses sourcegraph's awesome go-vcs and vcsstore libraries for accessing
    underlying git/mercurial repos, and GopherJS for compiling frontend code.

    Let me know what you think and how I can make it more useful!
    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to a topic in the
    Google Groups "golang-nuts" group.
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    --
    Follow me on twitter @slimsag <https://twitter.com/slimsag>.

    --
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  • Dmitri Shuralyov at Dec 21, 2014 at 11:26 am
    One question: by Cmd+R you mean Ctrl+R on Linux? I have Linux Mint 17 and
    Firefox 34 and Ctrl+R simply reload page. Pushing R also does nothing, also
    no errors in browser console.

    As Stephen said above, it would be mapped to Meta key. However, pressing
    just R on its own should work too.

    So far I've done very little testing outside of my own personal dev
    environment, which is OS X and Chrome/Safari. I'll have to try it on others
    and see if I can repro and fix the issue. Can you open an issue about it
    please so it can be tracked?

    Given that there are no errors in browser console, my guess is the keyboard
    event is simply not being recognized. I'm using the `keyIdentifier` value
    of the "keydown" event (see source here
    <https://github.com/shurcooL/frontend/blob/b88151c3343e662dea43713af93e26a8d5b50c59/select-list-view/main.go#L137>)
    and comparing it with "U+0052". This works in Safari and Chrome, but
    perhaps not all browsers have the same mapping.

    On Sunday, December 21, 2014 2:24:22 AM UTC-8, Dobrosław Żybort wrote:

    Hi,

    very nice site.

    One question: by Cmd+R you mean Ctrl+R on Linux? I have Linux Mint 17 and
    Firefox 34 and Ctrl+R simply reload page. Pushing R also does nothing,
    also no errors in browser console.

    W dniu niedziela, 21 grudnia 2014 04:30:26 UTC+1 użytkownik Dmitri
    Shuralyov napisał:
    Hello gophers,

    I'd like to announce a tool I've been working on; it's available in the
    form of a website.

    It's just like godoc.org, but given an import path of any Go package, it
    displays its *_source code_*.

    http://gotools.org/

    (2 minute screencast here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twjxYEubmzs)

    You can already see source code of a Go package on github, etc., so why
    this? Three main reasons:

    - It works on any valid Go package import path.


    - It doesn't matter if's hosted on GitHub or code.google.com, if it's
    a part of standard Go library, or if it uses a vanity import path. If you
    can go get it, you can see its source in the same place, e.g.:

    http://gotools.org/net/http
    http://gotools.org/rsc.io/pdf
    http://gotools.org/gopkg.in/pipe.v2
    http://gotools.org/github.com/shurcooL/gtdo


    - It supports "goto symbol" functionality, making navigation with
    keyboard only much faster/easier.


    - When you know what identifier you want to see, press Cmd+R (or just
    R in browsers that don't allow intercepting Cmd+R) to bring up a symbols
    view. This is inspired by Sublime Text and I wanted the same experience in
    this tool.

    Go symbol names are always unique, so this is an incredible way to
    navigate code. No need to search for NewRequest in net/http when you can
    *_lookup_*:

    http://gotools.org/net/http#NewRequest


    - It displays all .go files on one page.


    - Makes it easy to access entire Go package source at once and use
    Cmd+F to find something without having to know which .go file it's in.

    Combined with a predictable URL scheme of gotools.org/import-path, the
    entire site is very usable with keyboard only, which is great when you're
    in the middle of development and just want to quickly get to somewhere.

    It also supports viewing any branch or revision of a Go package. The
    query parameter `rev` specifies it; there's a branch selector dropdown box
    at the top. It's handy when you're in the middle of work and don't want to
    stash your changes, check out another branch just to look something up.

    ---

    I use godoc.org multiple times a day when I'm writing Go code. I find
    myself in situations where I want to use gotools.org to look up some
    source code of some Go package on some branch a few times a week. Not as
    often, but it is useful when the need arises. Being able to jump to any
    symbol with Cmd+R is really my most favorite feature, as well as ability to
    paste import path in the URL and go there.

    I want gotools.org to be the best tool for viewing Go package source
    code. I'm continuing work to fill in remaining missing features. I want
    this to become a helpful tool for the Go community, and if it can
    eventually be accepted as part of Go project that'd be something I'm happy
    to do. If you like the general idea behind it, improvement suggestions are
    welcome. It's open source so you can play a role in making it better. If
    it's something that adds complexity, open an issue first and discuss your
    proposal, as I have limited resources to spend on maintenance. (As an
    implementation detail, all frontend code is written in Go; there is no
    hand-written JavaScript, and I want to keep it that way. I also want to
    keep the code as short and simple as possible.)

    It uses sourcegraph's awesome go-vcs and vcsstore libraries for accessing
    underlying git/mercurial repos, and GopherJS for compiling frontend code.

    Let me know what you think and how I can make it more useful!
    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "golang-nuts" group.
    To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to golang-nuts+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
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  • Dmitri Shuralyov at Dec 21, 2014 at 11:41 am
    Also, make sure you're not holding down shift when pressing R.

    Sorry if I was misleading above, but when I said "press just R" I really
    meant "press just r" as in, don't do Shift+R. It will currently reject
    input if shift, ctrl, or alt is pressed. Only R and Meta+R (aka Cmd+R) will
    work. Perhaps I should relax that requirement a little...

    (Let me know if that fixes your issue.)

    On Sunday, December 21, 2014 3:26:21 AM UTC-8, Dmitri Shuralyov wrote:

    One question: by Cmd+R you mean Ctrl+R on Linux? I have Linux Mint 17
    and Firefox 34 and Ctrl+R simply reload page. Pushing R also does nothing,
    also no errors in browser console.

    As Stephen said above, it would be mapped to Meta key. However, pressing
    just R on its own should work too.

    So far I've done very little testing outside of my own personal dev
    environment, which is OS X and Chrome/Safari. I'll have to try it on others
    and see if I can repro and fix the issue. Can you open an issue about it
    please so it can be tracked?

    Given that there are no errors in browser console, my guess is the
    keyboard event is simply not being recognized. I'm using the `keyIdentifier`
    value of the "keydown" event (see source here
    <https://github.com/shurcooL/frontend/blob/b88151c3343e662dea43713af93e26a8d5b50c59/select-list-view/main.go#L137>)
    and comparing it with "U+0052". This works in Safari and Chrome, but
    perhaps not all browsers have the same mapping.

    On Sunday, December 21, 2014 2:24:22 AM UTC-8, Dobrosław Żybort wrote:

    Hi,

    very nice site.

    One question: by Cmd+R you mean Ctrl+R on Linux? I have Linux Mint 17
    and Firefox 34 and Ctrl+R simply reload page. Pushing R also does
    nothing, also no errors in browser console.

    W dniu niedziela, 21 grudnia 2014 04:30:26 UTC+1 użytkownik Dmitri
    Shuralyov napisał:
    Hello gophers,

    I'd like to announce a tool I've been working on; it's available in the
    form of a website.

    It's just like godoc.org, but given an import path of any Go package,
    it displays its *_source code_*.

    http://gotools.org/

    (2 minute screencast here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twjxYEubmzs)

    You can already see source code of a Go package on github, etc., so why
    this? Three main reasons:

    - It works on any valid Go package import path.


    - It doesn't matter if's hosted on GitHub or code.google.com, if
    it's a part of standard Go library, or if it uses a vanity import path. If
    you can go get it, you can see its source in the same place, e.g.:

    http://gotools.org/net/http
    http://gotools.org/rsc.io/pdf
    http://gotools.org/gopkg.in/pipe.v2
    http://gotools.org/github.com/shurcooL/gtdo


    - It supports "goto symbol" functionality, making navigation with
    keyboard only much faster/easier.


    - When you know what identifier you want to see, press Cmd+R (or
    just R in browsers that don't allow intercepting Cmd+R) to bring up a
    symbols view. This is inspired by Sublime Text and I wanted the same
    experience in this tool.

    Go symbol names are always unique, so this is an incredible way
    to navigate code. No need to search for NewRequest in net/http when you can
    *_lookup_*:

    http://gotools.org/net/http#NewRequest


    - It displays all .go files on one page.


    - Makes it easy to access entire Go package source at once and use
    Cmd+F to find something without having to know which .go file it's in.

    Combined with a predictable URL scheme of gotools.org/import-path, the
    entire site is very usable with keyboard only, which is great when you're
    in the middle of development and just want to quickly get to somewhere.

    It also supports viewing any branch or revision of a Go package. The
    query parameter `rev` specifies it; there's a branch selector dropdown box
    at the top. It's handy when you're in the middle of work and don't want to
    stash your changes, check out another branch just to look something up.

    ---

    I use godoc.org multiple times a day when I'm writing Go code. I find
    myself in situations where I want to use gotools.org to look up some
    source code of some Go package on some branch a few times a week. Not as
    often, but it is useful when the need arises. Being able to jump to any
    symbol with Cmd+R is really my most favorite feature, as well as ability to
    paste import path in the URL and go there.

    I want gotools.org to be the best tool for viewing Go package source
    code. I'm continuing work to fill in remaining missing features. I want
    this to become a helpful tool for the Go community, and if it can
    eventually be accepted as part of Go project that'd be something I'm happy
    to do. If you like the general idea behind it, improvement suggestions are
    welcome. It's open source so you can play a role in making it better. If
    it's something that adds complexity, open an issue first and discuss your
    proposal, as I have limited resources to spend on maintenance. (As an
    implementation detail, all frontend code is written in Go; there is no
    hand-written JavaScript, and I want to keep it that way. I also want to
    keep the code as short and simple as possible.)

    It uses sourcegraph's awesome go-vcs and vcsstore libraries for
    accessing underlying git/mercurial repos, and GopherJS for compiling
    frontend code.

    Let me know what you think and how I can make it more useful!
    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "golang-nuts" group.
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  • Dobrosław Żybort at Dec 21, 2014 at 12:28 pm
    Thank you for your replies. Still not working so I filled issue:
    https://github.com/shurcooL/gtdo/issues/21

    W dniu niedziela, 21 grudnia 2014 12:26:21 UTC+1 użytkownik Dmitri
    Shuralyov napisał:
    One question: by Cmd+R you mean Ctrl+R on Linux? I have Linux Mint 17
    and Firefox 34 and Ctrl+R simply reload page. Pushing R also does nothing,
    also no errors in browser console.

    As Stephen said above, it would be mapped to Meta key. However, pressing
    just R on its own should work too.

    So far I've done very little testing outside of my own personal dev
    environment, which is OS X and Chrome/Safari. I'll have to try it on others
    and see if I can repro and fix the issue. Can you open an issue about it
    please so it can be tracked?

    Given that there are no errors in browser console, my guess is the
    keyboard event is simply not being recognized. I'm using the `keyIdentifier`
    value of the "keydown" event (see source here
    <https://github.com/shurcooL/frontend/blob/b88151c3343e662dea43713af93e26a8d5b50c59/select-list-view/main.go#L137>)
    and comparing it with "U+0052". This works in Safari and Chrome, but
    perhaps not all browsers have the same mapping.

    On Sunday, December 21, 2014 2:24:22 AM UTC-8, Dobrosław Żybort wrote:

    Hi,

    very nice site.

    One question: by Cmd+R you mean Ctrl+R on Linux? I have Linux Mint 17
    and Firefox 34 and Ctrl+R simply reload page. Pushing R also does
    nothing, also no errors in browser console.

    W dniu niedziela, 21 grudnia 2014 04:30:26 UTC+1 użytkownik Dmitri
    Shuralyov napisał:
    Hello gophers,

    I'd like to announce a tool I've been working on; it's available in the
    form of a website.

    It's just like godoc.org, but given an import path of any Go package,
    it displays its *_source code_*.

    http://gotools.org/

    (2 minute screencast here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twjxYEubmzs)

    You can already see source code of a Go package on github, etc., so why
    this? Three main reasons:

    - It works on any valid Go package import path.


    - It doesn't matter if's hosted on GitHub or code.google.com, if
    it's a part of standard Go library, or if it uses a vanity import path. If
    you can go get it, you can see its source in the same place, e.g.:

    http://gotools.org/net/http
    http://gotools.org/rsc.io/pdf
    http://gotools.org/gopkg.in/pipe.v2
    http://gotools.org/github.com/shurcooL/gtdo


    - It supports "goto symbol" functionality, making navigation with
    keyboard only much faster/easier.


    - When you know what identifier you want to see, press Cmd+R (or
    just R in browsers that don't allow intercepting Cmd+R) to bring up a
    symbols view. This is inspired by Sublime Text and I wanted the same
    experience in this tool.

    Go symbol names are always unique, so this is an incredible way
    to navigate code. No need to search for NewRequest in net/http when you can
    *_lookup_*:

    http://gotools.org/net/http#NewRequest


    - It displays all .go files on one page.


    - Makes it easy to access entire Go package source at once and use
    Cmd+F to find something without having to know which .go file it's in.

    Combined with a predictable URL scheme of gotools.org/import-path, the
    entire site is very usable with keyboard only, which is great when you're
    in the middle of development and just want to quickly get to somewhere.

    It also supports viewing any branch or revision of a Go package. The
    query parameter `rev` specifies it; there's a branch selector dropdown box
    at the top. It's handy when you're in the middle of work and don't want to
    stash your changes, check out another branch just to look something up.

    ---

    I use godoc.org multiple times a day when I'm writing Go code. I find
    myself in situations where I want to use gotools.org to look up some
    source code of some Go package on some branch a few times a week. Not as
    often, but it is useful when the need arises. Being able to jump to any
    symbol with Cmd+R is really my most favorite feature, as well as ability to
    paste import path in the URL and go there.

    I want gotools.org to be the best tool for viewing Go package source
    code. I'm continuing work to fill in remaining missing features. I want
    this to become a helpful tool for the Go community, and if it can
    eventually be accepted as part of Go project that'd be something I'm happy
    to do. If you like the general idea behind it, improvement suggestions are
    welcome. It's open source so you can play a role in making it better. If
    it's something that adds complexity, open an issue first and discuss your
    proposal, as I have limited resources to spend on maintenance. (As an
    implementation detail, all frontend code is written in Go; there is no
    hand-written JavaScript, and I want to keep it that way. I also want to
    keep the code as short and simple as possible.)

    It uses sourcegraph's awesome go-vcs and vcsstore libraries for
    accessing underlying git/mercurial repos, and GopherJS for compiling
    frontend code.

    Let me know what you think and how I can make it more useful!
    --
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  • Brad Fitzpatrick at Dec 21, 2014 at 11:22 pm
    This is great!

    This is also one of those things where I know it's going to be addictive
    and I'll keep wanting more. So, before I use it too much I just want to say
    that this is awesome, before my inevitable feature requests start coming in
    and I risk sounding overall negative. :-)

    On Sat, Dec 20, 2014 at 7:30 PM, Dmitri Shuralyov wrote:

    Hello gophers,

    I'd like to announce a tool I've been working on; it's available in the
    form of a website.

    It's just like godoc.org, but given an import path of any Go package, it
    displays its *_source code_*.

    http://gotools.org/

    (2 minute screencast here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twjxYEubmzs)

    You can already see source code of a Go package on github, etc., so why
    this? Three main reasons:

    - It works on any valid Go package import path.


    - It doesn't matter if's hosted on GitHub or code.google.com, if it's
    a part of standard Go library, or if it uses a vanity import path. If you
    can go get it, you can see its source in the same place, e.g.:

    http://gotools.org/net/http
    http://gotools.org/rsc.io/pdf
    http://gotools.org/gopkg.in/pipe.v2
    http://gotools.org/github.com/shurcooL/gtdo


    - It supports "goto symbol" functionality, making navigation with
    keyboard only much faster/easier.


    - When you know what identifier you want to see, press Cmd+R (or just
    R in browsers that don't allow intercepting Cmd+R) to bring up a symbols
    view. This is inspired by Sublime Text and I wanted the same experience in
    this tool.

    Go symbol names are always unique, so this is an incredible way to
    navigate code. No need to search for NewRequest in net/http when you can
    *_lookup_*:

    http://gotools.org/net/http#NewRequest


    - It displays all .go files on one page.


    - Makes it easy to access entire Go package source at once and use
    Cmd+F to find something without having to know which .go file it's in.

    Combined with a predictable URL scheme of gotools.org/import-path, the
    entire site is very usable with keyboard only, which is great when you're
    in the middle of development and just want to quickly get to somewhere.

    It also supports viewing any branch or revision of a Go package. The query
    parameter `rev` specifies it; there's a branch selector dropdown box at the
    top. It's handy when you're in the middle of work and don't want to stash
    your changes, check out another branch just to look something up.

    ---

    I use godoc.org multiple times a day when I'm writing Go code. I find
    myself in situations where I want to use gotools.org to look up some
    source code of some Go package on some branch a few times a week. Not as
    often, but it is useful when the need arises. Being able to jump to any
    symbol with Cmd+R is really my most favorite feature, as well as ability to
    paste import path in the URL and go there.

    I want gotools.org to be the best tool for viewing Go package source
    code. I'm continuing work to fill in remaining missing features. I want
    this to become a helpful tool for the Go community, and if it can
    eventually be accepted as part of Go project that'd be something I'm happy
    to do. If you like the general idea behind it, improvement suggestions are
    welcome. It's open source so you can play a role in making it better. If
    it's something that adds complexity, open an issue first and discuss your
    proposal, as I have limited resources to spend on maintenance. (As an
    implementation detail, all frontend code is written in Go; there is no
    hand-written JavaScript, and I want to keep it that way. I also want to
    keep the code as short and simple as possible.)

    It uses sourcegraph's awesome go-vcs and vcsstore libraries for accessing
    underlying git/mercurial repos, and GopherJS for compiling frontend code.

    Let me know what you think and how I can make it more useful!

    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
    "golang-nuts" group.
    To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
    email to golang-nuts+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
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  • Dmitri Shuralyov at Dec 21, 2014 at 11:50 pm
    Hi Brad,

    Thanks for the encouraging words! That's great to hear. :)

    I too am very excited about the future of gotools.org! I think because of
    it's narrow scope (only deal with Go packages) it can become really good at
    solving that need: being able to quickly look up source code of any Go
    package on any branch/commit in any file, and being able to quickly
    navigate/find things within that code.

    I also think it could serve as a framework for future tools that also
    operate on any Go package on any branch. This is far off, but I had an idea
    for a diff mode specifically for Go packages that ignores boundaries
    between files, making it easy to see that nothing semantic has changed when
    you copy/paste some code between files. But this is just long term
    potential direction; for now I'm focusing on finishing the main mode of
    displaying source code.

    Right now there are still quite a few low-hanging fruit ideas for
    improvements and necessary missing features, like displaying line numbers
    and being able to link to/highlight sections of code (like you can on most
    other sites that show code), etc.

    There are also a few important bugs that need to solved before gotools.org
    is 100% usable for its primary purpose. In order of priority, they are:

    1. https://github.com/shurcooL/gtdo/issues/18 - some packages are
    incomplete due to use of `build.Import` and with `AllGoFiles` set to `true`
    2. https://github.com/shurcooL/gtdo/issues/12 - displaying latest versions
    of a Go package by default; ability to refresh (ala godoc.org) or
    auto-update (for every package that is viewed, I can run a check for a new
    version in background, and send a "There's a newer version available,
    refresh to see it" message to the client; all new requests will get latest
    version). As time passes, the initial checkout of each repo will become
    more stale.
    3. https://github.com/shurcooL/gtdo/issues/22 - handle case where there's a
    branch and tag with same name.

    After these are solved (they're all doable, a few hours of work each on
    average), I will be open towards doing other misc improvements and fixes,
    so ideas and suggestions will be very welcome!

    I expect I will have to make some hard decisions about what to say yes/no
    to, similar to Go itself, I want this tool to be simple and powerful - I
    don't want it to become like eclipse for example. But given that this is Go
    we're talking about, I think things will work out just fine. :)

    Anyway, thanks again and I look forward to seeing gotools.org get better!

    On Sunday, December 21, 2014 3:22:15 PM UTC-8, bradfitz wrote:

    This is great!

    This is also one of those things where I know it's going to be addictive
    and I'll keep wanting more. So, before I use it too much I just want to say
    that this is awesome, before my inevitable feature requests start coming in
    and I risk sounding overall negative. :-)


    On Sat, Dec 20, 2014 at 7:30 PM, Dmitri Shuralyov <shur...@gmail.com
    <javascript:>> wrote:
    Hello gophers,

    I'd like to announce a tool I've been working on; it's available in the
    form of a website.

    It's just like godoc.org, but given an import path of any Go package, it
    displays its *_source code_*.

    http://gotools.org/

    (2 minute screencast here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twjxYEubmzs)

    You can already see source code of a Go package on github, etc., so why
    this? Three main reasons:

    - It works on any valid Go package import path.


    - It doesn't matter if's hosted on GitHub or code.google.com, if it's
    a part of standard Go library, or if it uses a vanity import path. If you
    can go get it, you can see its source in the same place, e.g.:

    http://gotools.org/net/http
    http://gotools.org/rsc.io/pdf
    http://gotools.org/gopkg.in/pipe.v2
    http://gotools.org/github.com/shurcooL/gtdo


    - It supports "goto symbol" functionality, making navigation with
    keyboard only much faster/easier.


    - When you know what identifier you want to see, press Cmd+R (or just
    R in browsers that don't allow intercepting Cmd+R) to bring up a symbols
    view. This is inspired by Sublime Text and I wanted the same experience in
    this tool.

    Go symbol names are always unique, so this is an incredible way to
    navigate code. No need to search for NewRequest in net/http when you can
    *_lookup_*:

    http://gotools.org/net/http#NewRequest


    - It displays all .go files on one page.


    - Makes it easy to access entire Go package source at once and use
    Cmd+F to find something without having to know which .go file it's in.

    Combined with a predictable URL scheme of gotools.org/import-path, the
    entire site is very usable with keyboard only, which is great when you're
    in the middle of development and just want to quickly get to somewhere.

    It also supports viewing any branch or revision of a Go package. The
    query parameter `rev` specifies it; there's a branch selector dropdown box
    at the top. It's handy when you're in the middle of work and don't want to
    stash your changes, check out another branch just to look something up.

    ---

    I use godoc.org multiple times a day when I'm writing Go code. I find
    myself in situations where I want to use gotools.org to look up some
    source code of some Go package on some branch a few times a week. Not as
    often, but it is useful when the need arises. Being able to jump to any
    symbol with Cmd+R is really my most favorite feature, as well as ability to
    paste import path in the URL and go there.

    I want gotools.org to be the best tool for viewing Go package source
    code. I'm continuing work to fill in remaining missing features. I want
    this to become a helpful tool for the Go community, and if it can
    eventually be accepted as part of Go project that'd be something I'm happy
    to do. If you like the general idea behind it, improvement suggestions are
    welcome. It's open source so you can play a role in making it better. If
    it's something that adds complexity, open an issue first and discuss your
    proposal, as I have limited resources to spend on maintenance. (As an
    implementation detail, all frontend code is written in Go; there is no
    hand-written JavaScript, and I want to keep it that way. I also want to
    keep the code as short and simple as possible.)

    It uses sourcegraph's awesome go-vcs and vcsstore libraries for accessing
    underlying git/mercurial repos, and GopherJS for compiling frontend code.

    Let me know what you think and how I can make it more useful!

    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
    "golang-nuts" group.
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  • Kostarev Ilya at Dec 21, 2014 at 11:35 pm
    It’s nice. I like it. Thanks for your work.
    Regards
    --
    Kostarev Ilya

    On 21 Dec 2014 at 06:30:33, Dmitri Shuralyov (shurcool@gmail.com) wrote:

    Hello gophers,

    I'd like to announce a tool I've been working on; it's available in the form of a website.

    It's just like godoc.org, but given an import path of any Go package, it displays its _source code_.

    http://gotools.org/

    --
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  • Harold.Miao at Dec 22, 2014 at 1:53 am
    nice!!!

    Dmitri Shuralyov <shurcool@gmail.com>于2014年12月21日星期日写道:
    Hello gophers,

    I'd like to announce a tool I've been working on; it's available in the
    form of a website.

    It's just like godoc.org, but given an import path of any Go package, it
    displays its *_source code_*.

    http://gotools.org/

    (2 minute screencast here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twjxYEubmzs)

    You can already see source code of a Go package on github, etc., so why
    this? Three main reasons:

    - It works on any valid Go package import path.


    - It doesn't matter if's hosted on GitHub or code.google.com, if it's
    a part of standard Go library, or if it uses a vanity import path. If you
    can go get it, you can see its source in the same place, e.g.:

    http://gotools.org/net/http
    http://gotools.org/rsc.io/pdf
    http://gotools.org/gopkg.in/pipe.v2
    http://gotools.org/github.com/shurcooL/gtdo


    - It supports "goto symbol" functionality, making navigation with
    keyboard only much faster/easier.


    - When you know what identifier you want to see, press Cmd+R (or just
    R in browsers that don't allow intercepting Cmd+R) to bring up a symbols
    view. This is inspired by Sublime Text and I wanted the same experience in
    this tool.

    Go symbol names are always unique, so this is an incredible way to
    navigate code. No need to search for NewRequest in net/http when you can
    *_lookup_*:

    http://gotools.org/net/http#NewRequest


    - It displays all .go files on one page.


    - Makes it easy to access entire Go package source at once and use
    Cmd+F to find something without having to know which .go file it's in.

    Combined with a predictable URL scheme of gotools.org/import-path, the
    entire site is very usable with keyboard only, which is great when you're
    in the middle of development and just want to quickly get to somewhere.

    It also supports viewing any branch or revision of a Go package. The query
    parameter `rev` specifies it; there's a branch selector dropdown box at the
    top. It's handy when you're in the middle of work and don't want to stash
    your changes, check out another branch just to look something up.

    ---

    I use godoc.org multiple times a day when I'm writing Go code. I find
    myself in situations where I want to use gotools.org to look up some
    source code of some Go package on some branch a few times a week. Not as
    often, but it is useful when the need arises. Being able to jump to any
    symbol with Cmd+R is really my most favorite feature, as well as ability to
    paste import path in the URL and go there.

    I want gotools.org to be the best tool for viewing Go package source
    code. I'm continuing work to fill in remaining missing features. I want
    this to become a helpful tool for the Go community, and if it can
    eventually be accepted as part of Go project that'd be something I'm happy
    to do. If you like the general idea behind it, improvement suggestions are
    welcome. It's open source so you can play a role in making it better. If
    it's something that adds complexity, open an issue first and discuss your
    proposal, as I have limited resources to spend on maintenance. (As an
    implementation detail, all frontend code is written in Go; there is no
    hand-written JavaScript, and I want to keep it that way. I also want to
    keep the code as short and simple as possible.)

    It uses sourcegraph's awesome go-vcs and vcsstore libraries for accessing
    underlying git/mercurial repos, and GopherJS for compiling frontend code.

    Let me know what you think and how I can make it more useful!

    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
    "golang-nuts" group.
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    <javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml','golang-nuts%2bunsubscribe@googlegroups.com');>
    .
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    --

    Best Regards,
    Harold Miao

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  • Dmitri Shuralyov at Dec 23, 2014 at 8:33 am
    Good news, I've managed to fix 2 out of 3 important issues (related to
    basic functionality) already. The last remaining one is a way (manually or
    automatically or a mix of both) to have gotools.org to update repos and
    display the latest version of a given Go package by default, as opposed to
    a stale one.

    After that's done, it should be quite usable in the general case, and I can
    start thinking about minor additions and enhancements.

    I couldn't help but fix one minor frontend issue
    <https://github.com/shurcooL/gtdo/issues/24> just now because it was fun. :D

    On Sunday, December 21, 2014 5:53:27 PM UTC-8, Hong Miao wrote:

    nice!!!

    Dmitri Shuralyov <shur...@gmail.com <javascript:>>于2014年12月21日星期日写道:
    Hello gophers,

    I'd like to announce a tool I've been working on; it's available in the
    form of a website.

    It's just like godoc.org, but given an import path of any Go package, it
    displays its *_source code_*.

    http://gotools.org/

    (2 minute screencast here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twjxYEubmzs)

    You can already see source code of a Go package on github, etc., so why
    this? Three main reasons:

    - It works on any valid Go package import path.


    - It doesn't matter if's hosted on GitHub or code.google.com, if it's
    a part of standard Go library, or if it uses a vanity import path. If you
    can go get it, you can see its source in the same place, e.g.:

    http://gotools.org/net/http
    http://gotools.org/rsc.io/pdf
    http://gotools.org/gopkg.in/pipe.v2
    http://gotools.org/github.com/shurcooL/gtdo


    - It supports "goto symbol" functionality, making navigation with
    keyboard only much faster/easier.


    - When you know what identifier you want to see, press Cmd+R (or just
    R in browsers that don't allow intercepting Cmd+R) to bring up a symbols
    view. This is inspired by Sublime Text and I wanted the same experience in
    this tool.

    Go symbol names are always unique, so this is an incredible way to
    navigate code. No need to search for NewRequest in net/http when you can
    *_lookup_*:

    http://gotools.org/net/http#NewRequest


    - It displays all .go files on one page.


    - Makes it easy to access entire Go package source at once and use
    Cmd+F to find something without having to know which .go file it's in.

    Combined with a predictable URL scheme of gotools.org/import-path, the
    entire site is very usable with keyboard only, which is great when you're
    in the middle of development and just want to quickly get to somewhere.

    It also supports viewing any branch or revision of a Go package. The
    query parameter `rev` specifies it; there's a branch selector dropdown box
    at the top. It's handy when you're in the middle of work and don't want to
    stash your changes, check out another branch just to look something up.

    ---

    I use godoc.org multiple times a day when I'm writing Go code. I find
    myself in situations where I want to use gotools.org to look up some
    source code of some Go package on some branch a few times a week. Not as
    often, but it is useful when the need arises. Being able to jump to any
    symbol with Cmd+R is really my most favorite feature, as well as ability to
    paste import path in the URL and go there.

    I want gotools.org to be the best tool for viewing Go package source
    code. I'm continuing work to fill in remaining missing features. I want
    this to become a helpful tool for the Go community, and if it can
    eventually be accepted as part of Go project that'd be something I'm happy
    to do. If you like the general idea behind it, improvement suggestions are
    welcome. It's open source so you can play a role in making it better. If
    it's something that adds complexity, open an issue first and discuss your
    proposal, as I have limited resources to spend on maintenance. (As an
    implementation detail, all frontend code is written in Go; there is no
    hand-written JavaScript, and I want to keep it that way. I also want to
    keep the code as short and simple as possible.)

    It uses sourcegraph's awesome go-vcs and vcsstore libraries for accessing
    underlying git/mercurial repos, and GopherJS for compiling frontend code.

    Let me know what you think and how I can make it more useful!

    --
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    --

    Best Regards,
    Harold Miao
    --
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