FAQ
One nice thing about Go is that one statically compiled binary file is very
easy to deploy.

There are many golang web frameworks, revel, web.go, etc. But are there any
one that can compile everything, including static css/js files, templates,
etc, into one binary file?

Chris

--
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "golang-nuts" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to golang-nuts+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

Search Discussions

  • Mauro Risonho de Paula Assumpção at Mar 18, 2014 at 10:12 pm
    Web tool kit golang

    https://sites.google.com/site/gowebuitoolkit/

    But no 100% statically compiled web framework. It's works!

    @firebitsbr
    One nice thing about Go is that one statically compiled binary file is very
    easy to deploy.

    There are many golang web frameworks, revel, web.go, etc. But are there any
    one that can compile everything, including static css/js files, templates,
    etc, into one binary file?

    Chris

      --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
    "golang-nuts" group.
    To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
    email to golang-nuts+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
    For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "golang-nuts" group.
    To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to golang-nuts+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
    For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
  • ChrisLu at Mar 18, 2014 at 10:50 pm
    Thanks! I was looking for something different, but this is great! I am
    going to use this!

    But still, I still want a framework that's more "normal" (not gwt style).

    Chris

    On Tuesday, March 18, 2014 3:12:21 PM UTC-7, Mauro Risonho de Paula
    Assumpção wrote:
    Web tool kit golang

    https://sites.google.com/site/gowebuitoolkit/

    But no 100% statically compiled web framework. It's works!

    @firebitsbr
    One nice thing about Go is that one statically compiled binary file is
    very easy to deploy.

    There are many golang web frameworks, revel, web.go, etc. But are there
    any one that can compile everything, including static css/js files,
    templates, etc, into one binary file?

    Chris

    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
    "golang-nuts" group.
    To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
    email to golang-nuts...@googlegroups.com <javascript:>.
    For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "golang-nuts" group.
    To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to golang-nuts+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
    For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
  • Robert Johnstone at Mar 19, 2014 at 1:19 am
    There are a couple of tools that can convert files into Go source where the
    files are embedded as strings or byte arrays. That way, when you build you
    binary, all of the resources are embedded in the file. You can try my
    command tool for this [1], but the tools are pretty much the same.

    [1] http://godoc.org/bitbucket.org/rj/fileembed-go

    On Tuesday, 18 March 2014 18:08:09 UTC-4, ChrisLu wrote:

    One nice thing about Go is that one statically compiled binary file is
    very easy to deploy.

    There are many golang web frameworks, revel, web.go, etc. But are there
    any one that can compile everything, including static css/js files,
    templates, etc, into one binary file?

    Chris
    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "golang-nuts" group.
    To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to golang-nuts+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
    For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
  • Stephen Gutekanst at Mar 19, 2014 at 1:55 am
    You should be careful how often you do this, it can greatly slow down
    compile times and increase the memory required to build your application[1].

    Stephen

    [1] go-wiki: GcToolchainTricks<https://code.google.com/p/go-wiki/wiki/GcToolchainTricks>
    On Tuesday, March 18, 2014 6:19:41 PM UTC-7, Robert Johnstone wrote:

    There are a couple of tools that can convert files into Go source where
    the files are embedded as strings or byte arrays. That way, when you build
    you binary, all of the resources are embedded in the file. You can try my
    command tool for this [1], but the tools are pretty much the same.

    [1] http://godoc.org/bitbucket.org/rj/fileembed-go

    On Tuesday, 18 March 2014 18:08:09 UTC-4, ChrisLu wrote:

    One nice thing about Go is that one statically compiled binary file is
    very easy to deploy.

    There are many golang web frameworks, revel, web.go, etc. But are there
    any one that can compile everything, including static css/js files,
    templates, etc, into one binary file?

    Chris
    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "golang-nuts" group.
    To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to golang-nuts+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
    For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
  • Robert Johnstone at Mar 19, 2014 at 3:30 pm
    Hmmm, I was unaware of the bug in gc. I had certainly noticed that there
    was an impact on compile times. In any case, this approach has the
    advantage of being a pure Go solution without any odd compiler or linker
    steps, which certainly makes it useful (i.e. for app engine).

    I've mentioned it in other threads, I believe that given the importance
    that the Go team has placed on easy distribution of statically compiled
    executables, there should be a tool to do the above included in the
    standard distribution.

    On Tuesday, 18 March 2014 21:55:23 UTC-4, Stephen Gutekanst wrote:

    You should be careful how often you do this, it can greatly slow down
    compile times and increase the memory required to build your application[1].

    Stephen

    [1] go-wiki: GcToolchainTricks<https://code.google.com/p/go-wiki/wiki/GcToolchainTricks>
    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "golang-nuts" group.
    To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to golang-nuts+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
    For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
  • Rodrigo Kochenburger at Mar 19, 2014 at 5:52 pm
    I've never used this one but I remember seeing a discussion about it here
    on the mailing list: https://github.com/GeertJohan/go.rice

    - RK


    On Wed, Mar 19, 2014 at 8:30 AM, Robert Johnstone
    wrote:
    Hmmm, I was unaware of the bug in gc. I had certainly noticed that there
    was an impact on compile times. In any case, this approach has the
    advantage of being a pure Go solution without any odd compiler or linker
    steps, which certainly makes it useful (i.e. for app engine).

    I've mentioned it in other threads, I believe that given the importance
    that the Go team has placed on easy distribution of statically compiled
    executables, there should be a tool to do the above included in the
    standard distribution.


    On Tuesday, 18 March 2014 21:55:23 UTC-4, Stephen Gutekanst wrote:

    You should be careful how often you do this, it can greatly slow down
    compile times and increase the memory required to build your application[1].

    Stephen

    [1] go-wiki: GcToolchainTricks<https://code.google.com/p/go-wiki/wiki/GcToolchainTricks>
    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
    "golang-nuts" group.
    To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
    email to golang-nuts+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
    For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "golang-nuts" group.
    To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to golang-nuts+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
    For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
  • Brad Rydzewski at Mar 19, 2014 at 7:49 pm
    We use go.rice to embed templates and stylesheets. you can see an example
    here:
    https://github.com/drone/drone/blob/master/cmd/droned/drone.go#L117

    What I like about this particular implementation is that it attempts to
    serve the files from disk first. This means I don't need to compile my
    binary every time I change a static file. In fact, you only really need to
    embed the files when packaging your application for a deployment, which
    avoids slow (and potentially high-memory) compile times during testing as
    Stephen pointed out.

    On Wednesday, March 19, 2014 10:52:13 AM UTC-7, Rodrigo Kochenburger wrote:

    I've never used this one but I remember seeing a discussion about it here
    on the mailing list: https://github.com/GeertJohan/go.rice

    - RK


    On Wed, Mar 19, 2014 at 8:30 AM, Robert Johnstone <r.w.jo...@gmail.com<javascript:>
    wrote:
    Hmmm, I was unaware of the bug in gc. I had certainly noticed that there
    was an impact on compile times. In any case, this approach has the
    advantage of being a pure Go solution without any odd compiler or linker
    steps, which certainly makes it useful (i.e. for app engine).

    I've mentioned it in other threads, I believe that given the importance
    that the Go team has placed on easy distribution of statically compiled
    executables, there should be a tool to do the above included in the
    standard distribution.


    On Tuesday, 18 March 2014 21:55:23 UTC-4, Stephen Gutekanst wrote:

    You should be careful how often you do this, it can greatly slow down
    compile times and increase the memory required to build your application[1].

    Stephen

    [1] go-wiki: GcToolchainTricks<https://code.google.com/p/go-wiki/wiki/GcToolchainTricks>
    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
    "golang-nuts" group.
    To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
    email to golang-nuts...@googlegroups.com <javascript:>.
    For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "golang-nuts" group.
    To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to golang-nuts+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
    For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
  • ChrisLu at Mar 20, 2014 at 12:10 am
    go.rice is nice!

    All other framework creators, add this feature!

    Chris
    On Wednesday, March 19, 2014 12:49:44 PM UTC-7, Brad Rydzewski wrote:

    We use go.rice to embed templates and stylesheets. you can see an example
    here:
    https://github.com/drone/drone/blob/master/cmd/droned/drone.go#L117

    What I like about this particular implementation is that it attempts to
    serve the files from disk first. This means I don't need to compile my
    binary every time I change a static file. In fact, you only really need to
    embed the files when packaging your application for a deployment, which
    avoids slow (and potentially high-memory) compile times during testing as
    Stephen pointed out.

    On Wednesday, March 19, 2014 10:52:13 AM UTC-7, Rodrigo Kochenburger wrote:

    I've never used this one but I remember seeing a discussion about it here
    on the mailing list: https://github.com/GeertJohan/go.rice

    - RK

    On Wed, Mar 19, 2014 at 8:30 AM, Robert Johnstone wrote:

    Hmmm, I was unaware of the bug in gc. I had certainly noticed that
    there was an impact on compile times. In any case, this approach has the
    advantage of being a pure Go solution without any odd compiler or linker
    steps, which certainly makes it useful (i.e. for app engine).

    I've mentioned it in other threads, I believe that given the importance
    that the Go team has placed on easy distribution of statically compiled
    executables, there should be a tool to do the above included in the
    standard distribution.


    On Tuesday, 18 March 2014 21:55:23 UTC-4, Stephen Gutekanst wrote:

    You should be careful how often you do this, it can greatly slow down
    compile times and increase the memory required to build your application[1].

    Stephen

    [1] go-wiki: GcToolchainTricks<https://code.google.com/p/go-wiki/wiki/GcToolchainTricks>
    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
    Groups "golang-nuts" group.
    To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send
    an email to golang-nuts...@googlegroups.com.
    For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "golang-nuts" group.
    To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to golang-nuts+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
    For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

Related Discussions

Discussion Navigation
viewthread | post
Discussion Overview
groupgolang-nuts @
categoriesgo
postedMar 18, '14 at 10:08p
activeMar 20, '14 at 12:10a
posts9
users6
websitegolang.org

People

Translate

site design / logo © 2021 Grokbase