FAQ
If anyone is interested, I made a list of colors as image/color.RGBA. It
currently only has "web safe" colors, though I may add more as I want them.

https://github.com/btracey/colorlist

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  • Kevin Gillette at May 3, 2013 at 3:33 pm
    Is there going to be a LICENSE file?
    On Friday, May 3, 2013 9:03:17 AM UTC-6, Brendan Tracey wrote:

    If anyone is interested, I made a list of colors as image/color.RGBA. It
    currently only has "web safe" colors, though I may add more as I want them.

    https://github.com/btracey/colorlist
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  • Brendan Tracey at May 3, 2013 at 3:48 pm
    Oh, I forgot about that. Two questions:
    1) What is the least restrictive license?
    2) Is there a more-than-introduction to the various licenses that you
    particularly like? I've read a couple "brief introductions", but many
    articles imply that if you actually want to make decisions about the
    licenses you should read more about it.

    Thanks

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  • Péter Szilágyi at May 3, 2013 at 3:55 pm
    Hi,

    1) Many open source projects (Go itself) uses the BSD license. The MIT is
    another simple option, but usually people (companies even more) prefer BSD
    due to some extra brand protection. So if you want anyone to be able to use
    it, then BSD is a pretty nice option (it's also very short, so not much
    legal hassle). The GPL family is useful to ensure the code remains open.
    About the others I cannot say much since I've got better things to do with
    my life than read them :D

    2) This is a tough nut to crack. To make the best decision, you should
    actually read all of the text of all of them :P. As someone put it on the
    net, licenses are there to protect you from something you're afraid of
    (e.g. reusing your brand, losing credits, using in proprietary software).
    So I guess you should decide what you don't want to happen, and choose
    accordingly.

    Cheers,
       Peter

    On Fri, May 3, 2013 at 5:41 PM, Brendan Tracey wrote:

    Oh, I forgot about that. Two questions:
    1) What is the least restrictive license?
    2) Is there a more-than-introduction to the various licenses that you
    particularly like? I've read a couple "brief introductions", but many
    articles imply that if you actually want to make decisions about the
    licenses you should read more about it.

    Thanks

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  • Kevin Gillette at May 3, 2013 at 4:16 pm
    GPL will ensure that a library will not be used in many projects these days
    -- part of that is due to the FSF holy war, though the other part is due to
    the viral nature of GPL. Since Go is statically linked by default, the LGPL
    doesn't prevent Go libraries from being viral.

    I've also seen quite a few Go projects using the Apache license, which,
    iirc, is BSD compatible. For highest Go community adoption (and if you have
    no specific reason to do otherwise), the a copy of BSD license found in the
    Go source distribution (modified to use your name as copyright holder, if
    you like), is the best option. In other words, limiting the number of
    different license types makes developers more likely to use your software
    -- since they would already be using the Go stdlib, they must include the
    BSD license, but use of additional equivalently BSD licensed libraries only
    requires an addendum of the copyright holders name(s) to that same license
    file. Involving additional license types may require an annotation of which
    software components belong to each license type.
    On Friday, May 3, 2013 9:55:33 AM UTC-6, Péter Szilágyi wrote:

    Hi,

    1) Many open source projects (Go itself) uses the BSD license. The MIT is
    another simple option, but usually people (companies even more) prefer BSD
    due to some extra brand protection. So if you want anyone to be able to use
    it, then BSD is a pretty nice option (it's also very short, so not much
    legal hassle). The GPL family is useful to ensure the code remains open.
    About the others I cannot say much since I've got better things to do with
    my life than read them :D

    2) This is a tough nut to crack. To make the best decision, you should
    actually read all of the text of all of them :P. As someone put it on the
    net, licenses are there to protect you from something you're afraid of
    (e.g. reusing your brand, losing credits, using in proprietary software).
    So I guess you should decide what you don't want to happen, and choose
    accordingly.

    Cheers,
    Peter


    On Fri, May 3, 2013 at 5:41 PM, Brendan Tracey <tracey....@gmail.com<javascript:>
    wrote:
    Oh, I forgot about that. Two questions:
    1) What is the least restrictive license?
    2) Is there a more-than-introduction to the various licenses that you
    particularly like? I've read a couple "brief introductions", but many
    articles imply that if you actually want to make decisions about the
    licenses you should read more about it.

    Thanks

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  • Jan Mercl at May 3, 2013 at 4:28 pm

    On Fri, May 3, 2013 at 6:16 PM, Kevin Gillette wrote:
    GPL will ensure that a library will not be used in many projects these days
    -- part of that is due to the FSF holy war, though the other part is due to
    the viral nature of GPL. Since Go is statically linked by default, the LGPL
    doesn't prevent Go libraries from being viral.
    Holy war? This is basically political FUD, sorry. GPL is as rational
    as BSD even though they serve different goals. But both of those goals
    are perfectly legitimate. Even the fact that BSD is more popular (also
    b/c easier for proprietary projects) doesn't change anything about it.

    I use BSD only to be Go compatible. If Go would have been
    hypothetically published under GPL, all of my libs would be naturally
    GPL'ed.

    -j

    PS: It's quite probable that there's some GPL code being used before
    your message makes it to this list or before others can read it.

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  • Kevin Gillette at May 3, 2013 at 4:37 pm

    On Friday, May 3, 2013 10:27:36 AM UTC-6, Jan Mercl wrote:

    Holy war? This is basically political FUD, sorry. GPL is as rational
    as BSD even though they serve different goals. But both of those goals
    are perfectly legitimate. Even the fact that BSD is more popular (also
    b/c easier for proprietary projects) doesn't change anything about it.
    That's essentially my point. Whether or not it's FUD, developers do have
    quite a bit of fear, uncertainty, and doubt about the GPL, and thus many
    are less likely to use it than they otherwise would have been without the
    politization. I myself use quite a lot of GPL software (including the Linux
    kernel), though because it's not important to me personally that the code I
    release is shared back in kind (not that there's anything wrong with
    believing the opposite), and to streamline the usability of libraries, I've
    started rebranding them as owned by "The Go Authors".

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  • Hotei at May 3, 2013 at 4:42 pm
    Jan,
    Legitimate they may be - but the goals are slightly incompatible. As I
    understand the situation (which some call holy war) you can't "freely mix
    GPL and BSD". I'm not a lawyer, but I have been told by people I trust that
    one must use one or the other. That has implications downstream if you
    actually intend to comply (and expect to have others comply) with the
    license you chose. My choice was BSD because it made it simpler for people
    to use my code - which was why I released it in the first place.
    On Friday, May 3, 2013 12:27:36 PM UTC-4, Jan Mercl wrote:

    On Fri, May 3, 2013 at 6:16 PM, Kevin Gillette
    <extempor...@gmail.com <javascript:>> wrote:
    GPL will ensure that a library will not be used in many projects these days
    -- part of that is due to the FSF holy war, though the other part is due to
    the viral nature of GPL. Since Go is statically linked by default, the LGPL
    doesn't prevent Go libraries from being viral.
    Holy war? This is basically political FUD, sorry. GPL is as rational
    as BSD even though they serve different goals. But both of those goals
    are perfectly legitimate. Even the fact that BSD is more popular (also
    b/c easier for proprietary projects) doesn't change anything about it.

    I use BSD only to be Go compatible. If Go would have been
    hypothetically published under GPL, all of my libs would be naturally
    GPL'ed.

    -j

    PS: It's quite probable that there's some GPL code being used before
    your message makes it to this list or before others can read it.
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  • Ian Lance Taylor at May 3, 2013 at 5:54 pm

    On Fri, May 3, 2013 at 9:42 AM, Hotei wrote:
    Jan,
    Legitimate they may be - but the goals are slightly incompatible. As I
    understand the situation (which some call holy war) you can't "freely mix
    GPL and BSD". I'm not a lawyer, but I have been told by people I trust that
    one must use one or the other. That has implications downstream if you
    actually intend to comply (and expect to have others comply) with the
    license you chose. My choice was BSD because it made it simpler for people
    to use my code - which was why I released it in the first place.
    This is not the place for licensing discussions, but I can't resist a
    correction: it is entirely feasible to mix GPL and BSD code. Many GPL
    programs incorporate some BSD code, including GCC and glibc.

    Ian

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  • Henrik Johansson at May 3, 2013 at 6:01 pm
    But not the other way around. Personally i like GPL since it builds in
    mutual sharing. I think the viral part is good. :-)
      On May 3, 2013 7:54 PM, "Ian Lance Taylor" wrote:
    On Fri, May 3, 2013 at 9:42 AM, Hotei wrote:
    Jan,
    Legitimate they may be - but the goals are slightly incompatible. As I
    understand the situation (which some call holy war) you can't "freely mix
    GPL and BSD". I'm not a lawyer, but I have been told by people I trust that
    one must use one or the other. That has implications downstream if you
    actually intend to comply (and expect to have others comply) with the
    license you chose. My choice was BSD because it made it simpler for people
    to use my code - which was why I released it in the first place.
    This is not the place for licensing discussions, but I can't resist a
    correction: it is entirely feasible to mix GPL and BSD code. Many GPL
    programs incorporate some BSD code, including GCC and glibc.

    Ian

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  • Andrew Gerrand at May 3, 2013 at 4:09 pm
    BSD is short enough that you can read and understand its ramifications in a
    couple of minutes.

    If you just want people to be able to use your code for any purpose, BSD is
    a good choice.

    Andrew

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  • Andrew Gallant at May 3, 2013 at 4:57 pm
    1) What is the least restrictive license?
    The WTFPL. [1].

    The GPL is an infection as far as I'm concerned. I'll peacefully tolerate
    it, but I avoid it when it's reasonable to do so.

    [1] - http://wtfpl.org/

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  • Rob Pike at May 3, 2013 at 5:03 pm
    Public domain is the least restrictive of all.

    -rob

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  • Hotei at May 3, 2013 at 4:34 pm
    While surfing the subject a while back I found this
    http://opensource.org/licenses

    Their overview was very readable and seemed unbiased IMO.
    On Friday, May 3, 2013 11:03:17 AM UTC-4, Brendan Tracey wrote:

    If anyone is interested, I made a list of colors as image/color.RGBA. It
    currently only has "web safe" colors, though I may add more as I want them.

    https://github.com/btracey/colorlist
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  • Kevin Gillette at May 3, 2013 at 6:20 pm
    A suggestion: `Cadetblue` may be better called `CadetBlue` (there are many
    others: `Darkgoldenrod` -> `DarkGoldenrod`), etc.
    On Friday, May 3, 2013 9:03:17 AM UTC-6, Brendan Tracey wrote:

    If anyone is interested, I made a list of colors as image/color.RGBA. It
    currently only has "web safe" colors, though I may add more as I want them.

    https://github.com/btracey/colorlist
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  • Brendan Tracey at May 3, 2013 at 6:53 pm
    I thought about that, but is it Burlywood or BurlyWood? The place is two
    names, but feels like one word. Similarly, I often see "sky-blue". Is that
    two words SkyBlue, or one word, Skyblue? I think Aquamarine is just one
    word even though it kind of feels like two. I agree that the legibility is
    increased with capitalization, but it seemed easier to have a standard
    where the first letter is capitalized, and the rest are lowercase. I'm not
    very tied to that though if others feel strongly.

    "Public domain is the least restrictive of all.

    -rob "

    I had read that public domain is bad because it can be unclear what that
    means, and so it's safer to just use a very unrestrictive license. I don't
    know the truth of that, but in reading about licenses it seemed that what I
    thought the license said is not necessarily what it means in a courtroom.
    Thanks for all of your inputs on the license.

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  • Maxim Khitrov at May 3, 2013 at 7:10 pm

    On Fri, May 3, 2013 at 2:52 PM, Brendan Tracey wrote:
    I had read that public domain is bad because it can be unclear what that
    means, and so it's safer to just use a very unrestrictive license. I don't
    know the truth of that, but in reading about licenses it seemed that what I
    thought the license said is not necessarily what it means in a courtroom.
    Thanks for all of your inputs on the license.
    What it means is one issue, the lack of a warranty disclaimer is another:

    http://www.zetadev.com/misc/software-public-domain/

    Here's one attempt at fixing these problems:

    http://unlicense.org/

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  • Kevin Gillette at May 3, 2013 at 7:11 pm

    On Friday, May 3, 2013 12:52:52 PM UTC-6, Brendan Tracey wrote:

    I thought about that, but is it Burlywood or BurlyWood? The place is two
    names, but feels like one word. Similarly, I often see "sky-blue". Is that
    two words SkyBlue, or one word, Skyblue? I think Aquamarine is just one
    word even though it kind of feels like two. I agree that the legibility is
    increased with capitalization, but it seemed easier to have a standard
    where the first letter is capitalized, and the rest are lowercase. I'm not
    very tied to that though if others feel strongly.

    I don't disagree about the ambiguity in the absence of a canonical
    reference. I remembered there being such a reference, but a search turned
    up little standardization as far as word boundaries or capitalization goes.
    http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-color/#svg-color only specifies all lowercase
    names without spaces. Due to lack of such a *standardized* reference, I
    agree that there's little point in trying :-P

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  • Tad Glines at May 3, 2013 at 7:22 pm

    On Fri, May 3, 2013 at 11:52 AM, Brendan Tracey wrote:

    I had read that public domain is bad because it can be unclear what that
    means, and so it's safer to just use a very unrestrictive license. I don't
    know the truth of that, but in reading about licenses it seemed that what I
    thought the license said is not necessarily what it means in a courtroom.
    Thanks for all of your inputs on the license.

    I think what you would want is the unlicense: http://unlicense.org/
    It makes it clear that the code is being placed in the public domain, and
    adds stuff about being provided "as is" etc...

    -Tad

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  • Brendan Tracey at May 16, 2013 at 1:22 am
    After some requests, I changed the name of the package to
    colors. https://github.com/btracey/colors. Colorlist is still there, and
    will be unless there is a need to move it, but code should be directed to
    github.com/btracey/colors instead.

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  • Kevin Gillette at May 16, 2013 at 1:35 am
    If you changed the import path to end in colors, you should probably change
    the package declaration to also end in colors (otherwise people get rather
    confused when the expression colors.Black generates a compilation error).

    Note: RGBA values are 4-byte structures, regardless of platform, which on
    all of Go's supported architectures guarantees it to be as small as (and
    often smaller than) a pointer to that same struct. Additionally, using the
    value behind a pointer involves indirection, so even on 32-bit platforms,
    it'd be rather surprising if an *RGBA were ever faster to access than an
    RGBA value. For these reasons, unless you're passing an RGBA to a function
    that needs to modify it, there's almost never any reason to create a
    pointer to an RGBA value. Furthermore, you shouldn't feel any obligation to
    teach people how to use pointers in your README (since it's presumed that
    users of your package would already know how and when to use pointers, or
    that they need to learn the language through some of the official
    resources). That said, it looks like a handy package.
    On Wednesday, May 15, 2013 7:22:09 PM UTC-6, Brendan Tracey wrote:

    After some requests, I changed the name of the package to colors.
    https://github.com/btracey/colors. Colorlist is still there, and will be
    unless there is a need to move it, but code should be directed to
    github.com/btracey/colors instead.
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  • Brad Fitzpatrick at May 16, 2013 at 5:13 am
    Go style would be PeachPuff, instead of Peachpuff.

    Wait, that's a color?


    On Fri, May 3, 2013 at 8:03 AM, Brendan Tracey wrote:

    If anyone is interested, I made a list of colors as image/color.RGBA. It
    currently only has "web safe" colors, though I may add more as I want them.

    https://github.com/btracey/colorlist

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  • Dan Kortschak at May 16, 2013 at 5:43 am

    On Wed, 2013-05-15 at 22:13 -0700, Brad Fitzpatrick wrote:
    Go style would be PeachPuff, instead of Peachpuff.
    I think this has been discussed before - there is no standard for word
    breaks in the 'realm'. Though I agree.
    Wait, that's a color?
    Let's not go there. Have you tried discussing painting a house recently?

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  • Brendan Tracey at May 16, 2013 at 6:42 am

    On Wednesday, May 15, 2013 10:13:18 PM UTC-7, bradfitz wrote:
    Go style would be PeachPuff, instead of Peachpuff.
    I agree as well, but is the correct solution for me to go and decide where
    the word breaks are? I don't want to let the perfect be the enemy of the
    good, but at the same time I'm not interested in arguing where word breaks
    are. At least one site has
    Peachpuff http://www.bycolor.org/2012/02/peachpuff-color-code-ffadb9.html
    (note that this site has Saddle Brown, so they aren't using a first letter
    capital
    convention http://www.bycolor.org/2012/02/saddle-brown-color-code-8b4513.html
    )

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  • Mathieu Lonjaret at May 16, 2013 at 1:09 pm
    It's not in the list of color names for guys so, no. ;P
    http://blog.xkcd.com/2010/05/03/color-survey-results/
    (note that it's not very popular with girls either anyway).
    On 16 May 2013 07:13, Brad Fitzpatrick wrote:
    Go style would be PeachPuff, instead of Peachpuff.

    Wait, that's a color?


    On Fri, May 3, 2013 at 8:03 AM, Brendan Tracey wrote:

    If anyone is interested, I made a list of colors as image/color.RGBA. It
    currently only has "web safe" colors, though I may add more as I want them.

    https://github.com/btracey/colorlist

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  • Nigel Tao at May 16, 2013 at 5:47 pm

    On Wed, May 15, 2013 at 10:13 PM, Brad Fitzpatrick wrote:
    Go style would be PeachPuff, instead of Peachpuff.

    Wait, that's a color?
    Yes, PeachPuff is a color:
    https://code.google.com/p/leveldb-go/source/browse/leveldb/leveldb_test.go#235

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  • John Nagle at May 16, 2013 at 6:41 am

    On 5/3/2013 8:03 AM, Brendan Tracey wrote:
    If anyone is interested, I made a list of colors as image/color.RGBA. It
    currently only has "web safe" colors,
         I haven't heard the phrase "web safe colors" in a while. How
    many machines are still running in 8-bit indexed color mode?

         John Nagle

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