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Curious question. I have attended two Oracle events recently promoting Exadata. These are high performance, expensive systems.

At the same time we have purchased applications requiring small to mid-sized databases. All are written for SQL Server only.

We only have one data warehouse. We have hundreds of other applications. Is Oracle giving up on the small to mid-size database space? They sure aren't talking about it in their marketing events and I am not seeing apps come in the door written to be either database agnostic or written for Oracle.

Pete Barnett
Database Technologies Lead
Regence



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  • Andrew Kerber at Feb 9, 2011 at 3:30 pm
    Thats hard to say, but they are definitely pricing themselves rather high if
    they intend to compete in the small to mid-size market.
    On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 9:17 AM, Peter Barnett wrote:

    Curious question. I have attended two Oracle events recently promoting
    Exadata. These are high performance, expensive systems.

    At the same time we have purchased applications requiring small to
    mid-sized databases. All are written for SQL Server only.

    We only have one data warehouse. We have hundreds of other applications.
    Is Oracle giving up on the small to mid-size database space? They sure
    aren't talking about it in their marketing events and I am not seeing apps
    come in the door written to be either database agnostic or written for
    Oracle.


    Pete Barnett
    Database Technologies Lead
    Regence




    ____________________________________________________________________________________
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  • Charles Schultz at Feb 9, 2011 at 3:36 pm
    I would disagree, it is not hard to say at all. =) Oracle is feature-rich
    and robust, as well as bug-laden and overly complex. Which market do you
    think that caters to?
    On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 09:30, Andrew Kerber wrote:

    Thats hard to say, but they are definitely pricing themselves rather high
    if they intend to compete in the small to mid-size market.

    On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 9:17 AM, Peter Barnett wrote:

    Curious question. I have attended two Oracle events recently promoting
    Exadata. These are high performance, expensive systems.

    At the same time we have purchased applications requiring small to
    mid-sized databases. All are written for SQL Server only.

    We only have one data warehouse. We have hundreds of other applications.
    Is Oracle giving up on the small to mid-size database space? They sure
    aren't talking about it in their marketing events and I am not seeing apps
    come in the door written to be either database agnostic or written for
    Oracle.


    Pete Barnett
    Database Technologies Lead
    Regence




    ____________________________________________________________________________________
    Sucker-punch spam with award-winning protection.
    Try the free Yahoo! Mail Beta.
    http://advision.webevents.yahoo.com/mailbeta/features_spam.html
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l


    --
    Andrew W. Kerber

    'If at first you dont succeed, dont take up skydiving.'
    --
    Charles Schultz

    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
  • Rick Weiss at Feb 9, 2011 at 3:39 pm
    We recently were visited by an Oracle representative representing a newly created SMB (Small/Medium sized Business) sales group. They are trying to convince us that they (Oracle) want to work with the SMBs to bring in more of the Oracle stack. There was some implications of pricing flexibility, but of course nothing was concrete.


    I haven't really figured out what they meant by it, but it was a quick two day trip through fly over country visiting us and another customer in Bozeman, MT (RightNow Technologies perhaps).


    I was wondering if anyone else has had similar contacts from this group.





    Rick Weiss
    Oracle Database Administrator

    Student Assistance Foundation
    P.O.Box 203101
    2500 Broadway
    Helena, MT 59620-3101

    rweiss_at_safmt.org
    (406) 495-7356>>> Andrew Kerber 2/9/2011 8:30 AM >>>
    Thats hard to say, but they are definitely pricing themselves rather high if they intend to compete in the small to mid-size market.

    On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 9:17 AM, Peter Barnett wrote:

    Curious question. I have attended two Oracle events recently promoting Exadata. These are high performance, expensive systems.

    At the same time we have purchased applications requiring small to mid-sized databases. All are written for SQL Server only.

    We only have one data warehouse. We have hundreds of other applications. Is Oracle giving up on the small to mid-size database space? They sure aren't talking about it in their marketing events and I am not seeing apps come in the door written to be either database agnostic or written for Oracle.

    Pete Barnett
    Database Technologies Lead
    Regence

    Sucker-punch spam with award-winning protection.
    Try the free Yahoo! Mail Beta.
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    --
    Andrew W. Kerber

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    This email and any files transmitted with may be confidential and are intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to which they are addressed. If you have received this email in error please notify the sender immediately and delete this e-mail from your system. This message may contain confidential information and the contents of this email are strictly prohibited from being disseminated, distributed, printed or copied.

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  • David Aldridge at Feb 9, 2011 at 4:05 pm
    One of the selling points of Exadata is that you could host those hundreds of
    apps all on the same box as your data warehouse. Being written exclusively for
    SQL Server of course is a bit of a snag in that plan.

    ________________________________
    From: Peter Barnett
    To: Oracle-l
    Sent: Wed, 9 February, 2011 15:17:14
    Subject: Just Curious

    Curious question. I have attended two Oracle events recently promoting
    Exadata. These are high performance, expensive systems.

    At the same time we have purchased applications requiring small to mid-sized
    databases. All are written for SQL Server only.

    We only have one data warehouse. We have hundreds of other applications. Is
    Oracle giving up on the small to mid-size database space? They sure aren't
    talking about it in their marketing events and I am not seeing apps come in the
    door written to be either database agnostic or written for Oracle.

    Pete Barnett
    Database Technologies Lead
    Regence

    ____________________________________________________________________________________

    Sucker-punch spam with award-winning protection.
    Try the free Yahoo! Mail Beta.
    http://advision.webevents.yahoo.com/mailbeta/features_spam.html
  • Kellyn Pedersen at Feb 9, 2011 at 5:02 pm
    I'm newer to Exadata and the folks with more time on the system can correct me
    if they have experienced differently, but I'm going to disagree with the last
    statement.

    One of the trends I've noted in my last couple years in the industry are more
    and more "hybrid" databases, aka very, very large OLTP's. As these companies
    are trying to do more and more transactions on larger and larger sets of data,
    we have new challenges in the DBA frontier. It's no longer about being an OLAP
    or an OLTPDBA but a hybrid of both.

    Now that I'm working in an Exadataenvironnment, I see the huge benefits to OLAP
    databases- You want to perform a massive hash join? Great, be my guest, the
    speeds are amazing when we observe cell smart scans. You want to run that same
    query off that same join over and over again? Hey, have a storage index- great
    again!

    Now, you want to update numerous different rows on that 1.2 TB table with
    different where clauses? There's a bigger challenge that I'm not so thrilled
    when I observe on an Exadata system.

    As I see Oracle's Exadata being an excellent choice for the huge OLAP
    environments and for the smaller databases they can utilize standard Oracle or
    other platforms, (and I think we should all note they have MySQL now...) I
    don't see a benefit to putting a massive number of smaller OLTP's or a larger
    "hybrid" OLTP on an Exadata.

    Then again, I'm newer to Exadata- anyone, anyone, Bueller?



    Kellyn Pedersen
    Multi-Platform Database Administrator
    www.pythian.com
    http://www.linkedin.com/in/kellynpedersen
    www.dbakevlar.com


    From: David Aldridge
    To: regdba_at_yahoo.com; Oracle-l
    Sent: Wed, February 9, 2011 9:05:47 AM
    Subject: Re: Just Curious

    One of the selling points of Exadata is that you could host those hundreds of
    apps all on the same box as your data warehouse. Being written exclusively for
    SQL Server of course is a bit of a snag in that plan.

    From: Peter Barnett
    To: Oracle-l
    Sent: Wed, 9 February, 2011 15:17:14
    Subject: Just Curious

    Curious question. I have attended two Oracle events recently promoting
    Exadata. These are high performance, expensive systems.

    At the same time we have purchased applications requiring small to mid-sized
    databases. All are written for SQL Server only.

    We only have one data warehouse. We have hundreds of other applications. Is
    Oracle giving up on the small to mid-size database space? They sure aren't
    talking about it in their marketing events and I am not seeing apps come in the
    door written to be either database agnostic or written for Oracle.

    Pete Barnett
    Database Technologies Lead
    Regence

    Sucker-punch spam with award-winning protection.
    Try the free Yahoo! Mail Beta.
    http://advision.webevents.yahoo.com/mailbeta/features_spam.html

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postedFeb 9, '11 at 3:17p
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