FAQ
50 words would have looked better to me. I admit that some of them are
in the "obvious" or "unavoidable" category, but they are still too many:

abort
advise
after
algorithm
all
allocate
allow
alter
and
append
applied
archivelog
area
as
autobackup
auxiliary
auxname
available
backed
backup
backuppience
backups
backupset
before
between
block
by
catalog
change
channel
check
clear
closed
command
comment
completed
compressed
compression
configure
connect
controlfile
controlfilecopy
convert
copies
copy
corruption
create
critical
crosscheck
cumulative
current
database
datafile
datafilecopy
datapump
days
dba
dbid

db_name
db_recovery_file_dest
db_unique_name

decryption
delete
deletion
destination
detail
device
directory
disk
diskratio
dorecover
drop
dump
duplicate
duration
echo
encryption
exclude
exit
failure
false
file
filesperset
flashback
for
force
foreign
forever
format
from
full
G
global
grant
group
header
high
host
ID
identified
identifier
immediate
import
inaccessible
incarnation
include
including
incremental
input
instance
K
keep
level
like
list
load
location
log
logfile
logical
low
M
maintenance
maxcorrupt
maxdays
maxopenfiles
maxpiecesize
maxseq
maxsetsize
maxsize
minimize
mount
name
need
new
newname
no
nochecksum
noduplicates
noexclude
nofilenamecheck
nokeep
none
noparallel
noprompt
noredo
noresume
normal
not
obsolete
off
offline
on
only
open
option
parallelism
parameter
parameter_value_convert
parms
partial
password
pfile
platform
plus
point
policy
pool
preview
print
priority
privileges
proxy
quit
rate
readonly
recall
recover
recoverable
recovery
redundancy
register
release
repair
replace
report
reset
resetlogs
resricted
restore
resync
retention
reuse
revoke
run
scn
script
section
send
sequence
set
shipped
show
shutdown
since
size
skip
snapshot
spool
sql
standby
start
startup
summary
switch
tablespace
tag
target
tempfile
test
thread
time
times
to
transactional
transport
true
type
unavailable
uncatalog
undo
unlimited
unnecessary
unregister
until
up
upgrade
using
validate
virtual
window
with

Stephane Faroult
RoughSea Ltd <http://www.roughsea.com>
Konagora <http://www.konagora.com>
RoughSea Channel on Youtube <http://www.youtube.com/user/roughsealtd>
On 10/27/2010 10:50 PM, Guillermo Alan Bort wrote:
Both RMAN and PL/SQL, as well as most high level programming languages
hace way too many keywords, which is aimed to let the high level
languages be as close as natural language as possible. As you pointed
out, people usually know very few words, but the dictionary has an
awful lot of words...

I can't speak to autotools, but I reckon that the number of keywords
in RMAN is related to its flexibility, which I think is one of its key
features (it's very hard to create a tool to cover all the possible
backup and recovery needs).

That being said, If I'd wrote down all the RAMN keywords I know, I
doubt I'll get to 50... so I guess I'll have to revise both my belief
that I know RMAN very well and the RMAN documentation as well as set
up a sandbox to test out all those new keywords... Can you provide
your list?


cheers
Alan.-


On Wed, Oct 27, 2010 at 5:08 PM, Stephane Faroult
wrote:
I have just tried to compile all the RMAN keywords (by "keyword" I
mean any terminal term without space that you find in all those
wonderful syntactical diagrams that brighten up our reading of
Oracle reference docs).
Having used RMAN, I had some apprehension, and I wasn't
disappointed. If anyone is interested, my tally is 242 different
terms (I have excluded the RMAN command itself and what can be
passed to it on the command line). Jesus. Posters on most forums
don't seem to have that much vocabulary. Compared to RMAN, the GNU
autotools (I was in them shortly before) are a piece of cake.
Whatever the opinion someone I'm thinking of has of Don Chamberlin
and of his understanding of the relational model, at least Don and
Ray Boyce managed to do an awful lot with very few keywords.

I like to quote to developers the "Art Poétique" of Boileau, in
particular things such as:
“What is conceived well is expressed clearly.”
or
“No one who cannot limit himself has ever been able to write.”
(uh, perhaps time I stop my rant).

I dream that Oracle products get a stamp of approval from Steve
Jobs before being released.

--
Stephane Faroult
RoughSea Ltd <http://www.roughsea.com>
Konagora <http://www.konagora.com>
RoughSea Channel on Youtube <http://www.youtube.com/user/roughsealtd>
--
http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l

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  • John Thomas at Oct 28, 2010 at 9:32 pm
    If you want to back up an online Oracle database you can:

    write a script to generate begin backup...
    copy all the datafiles and logfiles to the backup device (split the
    mirrors, whatever)...
    end backup for all the tablespaces;
    switch logfiles
    hope your scripts are correct and did not miss any files

    OR

    logon to RMAN TARGET / and type BACKUP DATABASE PLUS ARCHIVELOG;

    Oh and with the "old-fashioned" method be aware that I/O waits on your redo
    logs might go throught the roof for a while. RMAN just rewrites "fractured"
    blocks.

    Things get a bit more complicated if you want to select incremental or
    incrementally refreshed image backups, but what external tool could do that,
    regardless of requiring four or five more keywords RMAN needs.

    But the FRA and retention policy/windows can also manage your archive logs
    to suit your business's requirement. Or you could write complex, potentially
    unreliable scripts in Korn-shell/PERL/Windows (do pull the other one) to do
    the same.

    The gap Oracle *is* missing is in promoting the universal use of the
    database as a storage platform.

    RMAN/Oracle has been able to do Flashback to a point in time, or efficient,
    change-only backups for years.

    But for nearly every site recovering the database to DD-MON-YY HH:MI:SS is
    no use unless you can also recover the external files to the same point in
    time.

    So the SAN providers provide proprietary techniques to roll the entire
    filesystem back to any point in time. Maybe it works. Maybe there are no
    bugs in the de-duplication technology. Or bugs in the time-consistent backup
    of datafiles from the logical volume manager, .

    It's a subtle difference, Oracle has the odd bug or two from time-to-time.
    But serious bugs in recoverability very rarely get past beta testers.

    Serious bugs in SAN-based logging systems primarily built to recover
    unstructured data may go unnoticed. Until far too late.

    Cheers,

    JT
    On 28 October 2010 10:59, Nuno Souto wrote:

    Stephane Faroult wrote,on my timestamp of 28/10/2010 7:08 AM:

    I have just tried to compile all the RMAN keywords (by "keyword" I mean
    any
    terminal term without space that you find in all those wonderful
    syntactical
    diagrams that brighten up our reading of Oracle reference docs).
    You mean you FOUND *any* syntactical diagrams for RMAN?



    I like to quote to developers the "Art Poétique" of Boileau, in particular
    things such as:
    “What is conceived well is expressed clearly.”
    Bingo!


    RMAN is not too bad in 10gr2. That is indeed the first release in which
    it's made any sense to me to use it.
    Previously I simply could not subscribe to the notion that I'd have to
    learn an entire new language at every point release of Oracle in order to
    use a backup product...

    And that feeling still goes for a lot of other features in the latest
    releases of Oracle. ASM and the cacophony of IO methods and IO interfaces
    comes to mind.

    No: the "easy and familiar SQL" used to command ASM is NOT easy nor is it
    FAMILIAR! And don't get me started on the hidden logging of the thing!
    Nor the multitude of "cluster-specific" file systems and cryptic stuff put
    out by Oracle in the last 5 years.

    Rather than re-inventing the wheel at every new release in order to
    increase revenue from training and "certifications", it'd do Oracle better
    to stabilize its current range, commands and features.

    M$ and IttyBittyMachines did it, why can't they?
    Ah well...
    --
    Cheers
    Nuno Souto
    dbvision_at_iinet.net.au

    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l

    --
    Cheers,

    John

    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
  • Dbvision_at_iinet.net.au at Oct 29, 2010 at 2:32 am
    Thank you John. I didn't ask for an explanation of the RMAN commands or its
    capabilities, far from it. Can I ask you to re-read my post and try to
    understand it before replying off-topic?

    On Fri Oct 29 5:32, John Thomas sent:
    If you want to back up an online Oracle database you can:write a script to
    generate begin backup... copy all the datafiles and logfiles to the backup device
    (split the mirrors, whatever)...
    end backup for all the tablespaces;switch logfileshope your scripts are correct
    and did not miss any filesOR logon to RMAN TARGET / and type BACKUP DATABASE PLUS
    ARCHIVELOG;

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