FAQ
Hello all,


I'm trying to dump some blocks with bbed. It asks for a password.
According to Steve Adams, if I used strings on bbed I should find the
password in 30 seconds... It's been 3 days... anybody know how to find
it?


TIA.


Abraham Guerra
American Family Insurance
Oracle DBA

Search Discussions

  • Tanel Põder at Apr 12, 2005 at 7:01 pm
    Hi,

    It's a really trivial task to find the password if you think about it a bit,
    that's why I think it's everyone's own responsibility to find it out if you
    actually need the utility. Also, the more people start messing up their
    databases with bbed, the more likely will Oracle remove it from next
    distribution at all or encrypt the password or similar...

    Tanel.

    Original Message -----
    From: "Guerra, Abraham J"
    To:
    Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2005 10:39 PM
    Subject: How can I get the BBED password?
    Hello all,

    I'm trying to dump some blocks with bbed. It asks for a password.
    According to Steve Adams, if I used strings on bbed I should find the
    password in 30 seconds... It's been 3 days... anybody know how to find
    it?

    TIA.
    Abraham Guerra
    American Family Insurance
    Oracle DBA
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
  • Christian Antognini at Apr 13, 2005 at 3:00 am
    Hi Abraham
    I'm trying to dump some blocks with bbed. It asks for a password.
    According to Steve Adams, if I used strings on bbed I should find the
    password in 30 seconds... It's been 3 days... anybody know how to find
    it?
    During Steve's Miracle Master Class a couple of years ago I asked the =
    same question to Steve. I had the same response... but he also added "If =
    you are able to use it, you are able to find the password!".=20
    In some ways I agree, but I must admit that I didn't like the answer =
    that much... (sorry Steve) Anyway, after 5 or 10 minutes or so I was =
    able to find it (I believe that also Steve didn't manage to get it in 30 =
    seconds!)

    Now, if you are looking for it since three days, it's time, in my =
    opinion, to give you a tip...

    When you start BBED you get something like this:

    oracle_at_trantor:/u00/app/oracle/ [B1020] bbed
    Password:

    2) Now, if you think about it a bit, as suggest by Tanel, you should end =
    up executing the following statement:

    oracle_at_trantor:/u00/app/oracle/ [B1020] strings `which bbed` | grep -i =
    password
    Orclpasswords
    passwords
    namesctl.internal_encrypt_password
    namesctl.server_password
    passwords
    Orclpasswords
    namesctl.server_password
    namesctl.internal_encrypt_password
    PASSWORD - Required parameter
    password

    HTH

    Chris
  • Parker, Matthew at Apr 13, 2005 at 3:25 am
    An excellent observation Tanel.
    Abraham, what exactly are you looking to accomplish? The standard dump =
    utilities of Oracle provide most of what you may be looking for. Out of =
    all the block repairs I have had to do over the years, the only thing =
    bbed has provided me is the ability to run a verify on the block I have =
    repaired before I replace the block in the file, since dbv requires the =
    block to be a part of the file, otherwise I find the tool to be less =
    than useful.=20

    In the world there are about 7 Oracle BDE/RDBMS development people who =
    can edit blocks well and only 1 or 2 others who understand and try to =
    edit the redo stream, and in my dealings with most of them they have =
    their own tools because bbed is archaic. The lower end Support personnel =
    who do use bbed, normally do not have the skills or knowledge to edit =
    the blocks in the first place.

    If you are trying to understand block structures, then you should read =
    the documentation and the many papers that are available. There is no =
    single source of information that will tell you everything and there are =
    a lot of flags and pointer values that are not documented anywhere but =
    in the code itself. In the last year working on lots of block =
    corruptions from Linux induced problems, almost every time, the actual =
    people who can edit blocks well, had to reference the code for =
    determination of some of the flags. It is just the reality that =
    everyone, can't know everything.
    So back to the question, what are you truly trying to find out? The tool =
    has no training mode and it does not document the oracle block structure =
    for you.=20

    -----Original Message-----
    From: oracle-l-bounce_at_freelists.org =
    On Behalf Of Tanel P=F5der
    Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2005 3:24 PM
    To: oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: Re: How can I get the BBED password?

    Hi,

    It's a really trivial task to find the password if you think about it a =
    bit,=20
    that's why I think it's everyone's own responsibility to find it out if =
    you=20
    actually need the utility. Also, the more people start messing up their=20
    databases with bbed, the more likely will Oracle remove it from next=20
    distribution at all or encrypt the password or similar...

    Tanel.

    Original Message -----=20
    From: "Guerra, Abraham J"
    To:
    Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2005 10:39 PM
    Subject: How can I get the BBED password?
    Hello all,

    I'm trying to dump some blocks with bbed. It asks for a password.
    According to Steve Adams, if I used strings on bbed I should find the
    password in 30 seconds... It's been 3 days... anybody know how to find
    it?

    TIA.
    Abraham Guerra
    American Family Insurance
    Oracle DBA
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l=20
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
  • Guerra, Abraham J at Apr 13, 2005 at 10:27 am
    Thanks to all that have responded...

    Well, something that I've noticed with regular dumps is that when you
    update a null column in a record, the whole row is migrated within the
    block to a new location and the space in never reused... I want to use
    bbed to see if that is true...

    Thanks again to all,

    Abraham

    -----Original Message-----
    From: oracle-l-bounce_at_freelists.org
    On Behalf Of Parker, Matthew
    Sent: Wednesday, April 13, 2005 2:22 AM
    To: tanel.poder.003_at_mail.ee; oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: RE: How can I get the BBED password?

    An excellent observation Tanel.
    Abraham, what exactly are you looking to accomplish? The standard dump =
    =3D
    utilities of Oracle provide most of what you may be looking for. Out of
    =3D
    all the block repairs I have had to do over the years, the only thing =
    =3D
    bbed has provided me is the ability to run a verify on the block I have
    =3D
    repaired before I replace the block in the file, since dbv requires the
    =3D
    block to be a part of the file, otherwise I find the tool to be less =3D
    than useful.=3D20

    In the world there are about 7 Oracle BDE/RDBMS development people who =
    =3D
    can edit blocks well and only 1 or 2 others who understand and try to =
    =3D
    edit the redo stream, and in my dealings with most of them they have =3D
    their own tools because bbed is archaic. The lower end Support personnel
    =3D
    who do use bbed, normally do not have the skills or knowledge to edit =
    =3D
    the blocks in the first place.

    If you are trying to understand block structures, then you should read =
    =3D
    the documentation and the many papers that are available. There is no =
    =3D
    single source of information that will tell you everything and there are
    =3D
    a lot of flags and pointer values that are not documented anywhere but =
    =3D
    in the code itself. In the last year working on lots of block =3D
    corruptions from Linux induced problems, almost every time, the actual =
    =3D
    people who can edit blocks well, had to reference the code for =3D
    determination of some of the flags. It is just the reality that =3D
    everyone, can't know everything.
    So back to the question, what are you truly trying to find out? The tool
    =3D
    has no training mode and it does not document the oracle block structure
    =3D
    for you.=3D20

    -----Original Message-----
    From: oracle-l-bounce_at_freelists.org =3D
    On Behalf Of Tanel P=3DF5der
    Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2005 3:24 PM
    To: oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: Re: How can I get the BBED password?

    Hi,

    It's a really trivial task to find the password if you think about it a
    =3D
    bit,=3D20
    that's why I think it's everyone's own responsibility to find it out if
    =3D
    you=3D20
    actually need the utility. Also, the more people start messing up
    their=3D20
    databases with bbed, the more likely will Oracle remove it from =
    next=3D20
    distribution at all or encrypt the password or similar...

    Tanel.

    Original Message -----=3D20
    From: "Guerra, Abraham J"
    To:
    Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2005 10:39 PM
    Subject: How can I get the BBED password?
    Hello all,

    I'm trying to dump some blocks with bbed. It asks for a password.
    According to Steve Adams, if I used strings on bbed I should find the
    password in 30 seconds... It's been 3 days... anybody know how to find
    it?

    TIA.

    Abraham Guerra
    American Family Insurance
    Oracle DBA
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l=3D20
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
  • Guerra, Abraham J at Apr 13, 2005 at 11:00 am
    Hello Tanel,

    Have you used the utility? If so, did you discover the password or =
    somebody else told it to you?

    Thanks.

    Abraham

    -----Original Message-----
    From: oracle-l-bounce_at_freelists.org =
    On Behalf Of Tanel P=F5der
    Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2005 5:24 PM
    To: oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: Re: How can I get the BBED password?

    Hi,

    It's a really trivial task to find the password if you think about it a =
    bit,=20
    that's why I think it's everyone's own responsibility to find it out if =
    you=20
    actually need the utility. Also, the more people start messing up their=20
    databases with bbed, the more likely will Oracle remove it from next=20
    distribution at all or encrypt the password or similar...

    Tanel.

    Original Message -----=20
    From: "Guerra, Abraham J"
    To:
    Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2005 10:39 PM
    Subject: How can I get the BBED password?
    Hello all,

    I'm trying to dump some blocks with bbed. It asks for a password.
    According to Steve Adams, if I used strings on bbed I should find the
    password in 30 seconds... It's been 3 days... anybody know how to find
    it?

    TIA.
    Abraham Guerra
    American Family Insurance
    Oracle DBA
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l=20
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
  • Tanel Põder at Apr 13, 2005 at 2:29 pm
    Yep, I've used BBED - only for having some fun, there's not much serious
    stuff you can/should do with it.

    I discovered the password in couple of minutes, it really doesn't take much
    to write a loop in a decent shell...

    Tanel.

    Original Message -----
    From: "Guerra, Abraham J"
    To:;
    Sent: Wednesday, April 13, 2005 3:56 PM
    Subject: RE: How can I get the BBED password?

    Hello Tanel,

    Have you used the utility? If so, did you discover the password or somebody
    else told it to you?

    Thanks.

    Abraham

    -----Original Message-----
    From: oracle-l-bounce_at_freelists.org
    On Behalf Of Tanel Põder
    Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2005 5:24 PM
    To: oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: Re: How can I get the BBED password?

    Hi,

    It's a really trivial task to find the password if you think about it a bit,
    that's why I think it's everyone's own responsibility to find it out if you
    actually need the utility. Also, the more people start messing up their
    databases with bbed, the more likely will Oracle remove it from next
    distribution at all or encrypt the password or similar...

    Tanel.

    Original Message -----
    From: "Guerra, Abraham J"
    To:
    Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2005 10:39 PM
    Subject: How can I get the BBED password?
    Hello all,

    I'm trying to dump some blocks with bbed. It asks for a password.
    According to Steve Adams, if I used strings on bbed I should find the
    password in 30 seconds... It's been 3 days... anybody know how to find
    it?

    TIA.
    Abraham Guerra
    American Family Insurance
    Oracle DBA
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l

    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
  • Wolfgang Breitling at Apr 13, 2005 at 2:47 pm
    I have used it to deliberately corrupt a block to find out how RMAN
    report block corruptions. Of course there are other ways to corrupt
    blocks but it seemed like a good excuse to build and use bbed.

    Guerra, Abraham J wrote:
    Hello Tanel,

    Have you used the utility? If so, did you discover the password or =
    somebody else told it to you?

    Thanks.

    Abraham
    --
    Regards

    Wolfgang Breitling
    Centrex Consulting Corporation
    www.centrexcc.com
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
  • Vitalis at Apr 19, 2005 at 8:47 am

    On 4/13/05, Guerra, Abraham J wrote:
    Hello Tanel,
    =20
    Have you used the utility? If so, did you discover the password or =3D
    somebody else told it to you?
    =20
    Thanks.
    =20
    Abraham
    =20
    -----Original Message-----
    From: oracle-l-bounce_at_freelists.org =3D
    On Behalf Of Tanel P=3DF5der
    Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2005 5:24 PM
    To: oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: Re: How can I get the BBED password?
    =20
    Hi,
    =20
    It's a really trivial task to find the password if you think about it a = =3D
    bit,=3D20
    that's why I think it's everyone's own responsibility to find it out if = =3D
    you=3D20
    actually need the utility. Also, the more people start messing up their= =3D20
    databases with bbed, the more likely will Oracle remove it from next=3D20
    distribution at all or encrypt the password or similar...
    =20
    Tanel.
    =20
    ----- Original Message -----=3D20
    From: "Guerra, Abraham J"
    To:
    Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2005 10:39 PM
    Subject: How can I get the BBED password?
    =20
    Hello all,

    I'm trying to dump some blocks with bbed. It asks for a password.
    According to Steve Adams, if I used strings on bbed I should find the
    password in 30 seconds... It's been 3 days... anybody know how to find
    it?

    TIA.

    Abraham Guerra
    American Family Insurance
    Oracle DBA
    Hi Abraham,

    Did you manage to find the password eventually?
    I've read that others hadn't given it to you because they assumed the
    password can be easily found in the ascii codes of the binary file.
    That's not true on all environments.

    If you're still stuck, have a look at the following page:
    http://www.freelists.org/archives/oracle-l/04-2004/msg01068.html

    Regards,
    Jerome
  • Niall Litchfield at Apr 19, 2005 at 9:19 am

    Hi Abraham,

    Did you manage to find the password eventually?
    I've read that others hadn't given it to you because they assumed the
    password can be easily found in the ascii codes of the binary file.
    That's not true on all environments.
    I read it differently. I read it as being, essentially, if you ain't smart
    enough to find or crack the password, we'll keep it secret because its an
    internal only hacker level tool.
  • Cichomitiko gmail at Apr 19, 2005 at 9:28 am
    I think you have to read it like this:

    Use strings to find the ascii code
    Use loop to probe

    :)

    Cheers
    Dimitre

    Original Message -----
    From: "Niall Litchfield"
    To:
    Cc:;
    Sent: Tuesday, April 19, 2005 3:15 PM
    Subject: Re: How can I get the BBED password?
    Hi Abraham,

    Did you manage to find the password eventually?
    I've read that others hadn't given it to you because they assumed the
    password can be easily found in the ascii codes of the binary file.
    That's not true on all environments.
    I read it differently. I read it as being, essentially, if you ain't smart
    enough to find or crack the password, we'll keep it secret because its an
    internal only hacker level tool.


    --
    Niall Litchfield
    Oracle DBA
    http://www.niall.litchfield.dial.pipex.com

    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
  • Vitalis at Apr 20, 2005 at 7:02 am

    On 4/19/05, Niall Litchfield wrote:
    =20
    Hi Abraham,
    =20
    Did you manage to find the password eventually?
    I've read that others hadn't given it to you because they assumed the=
    =20
    password can be easily found in the ascii codes of the binary file.
    That's not true on all environments.
    =20
    =20
    I read it differently. I read it as being, essentially, if you ain't sma= rt
    enough to find or crack the password, we'll keep it secret because its an
    internal only hacker level tool.=20;-)
    That was my second impression as well.

    Jerome
  • Guerra, Abraham J at Apr 13, 2005 at 11:30 am
    Hello Lex,

    I've been using the 'alter system dump' but I have seen that the offset
    of the deleted row is never reused in my tests... =20

    Instead of using deleted space it jumps to the next block when needing
    new space. This is Oracle 9 I'm doing the testing with.

    Thanks for your observations.

    Abraham

    -----Original Message-----
    From: Lex de Haan =20
    Sent: Wednesday, April 13, 2005 10:10 AM
    To: Guerra, Abraham J
    Cc: matthewp_at_amazon.com; tanel.poder.003_at_mail.ee; oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: RE: How can I get the BBED password?

    This is plain wrong. Oracle will do garbage collection at due time. that
    is, if there is not enough free space left "in the middle" but Oracle
    knows the total free space for the block is "good enough"...

    and for this type of investigations, you don't need BBED. just "alter
    system dump ..." will do the trick.

    cheers,
    Lex.
    Thanks to all that have responded...

    Well, something that I've noticed with regular dumps is that when you
    update a null column in a record, the whole row is migrated within the
    block to a new location and the space in never reused... I want to use
    bbed to see if that is true...

    Thanks again to all,

    Abraham

    -----Original Message-----
    From: oracle-l-bounce_at_freelists.org
    On Behalf Of Parker, Matthew
    Sent: Wednesday, April 13, 2005 2:22 AM
    To: tanel.poder.003_at_mail.ee; oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: RE: How can I get the BBED password?


    An excellent observation Tanel.
    Abraham, what exactly are you looking to accomplish? The standard dump =3D
    =3D3D
    utilities of Oracle provide most of what you may be looking for. Out of
    =3D3D
    all the block repairs I have had to do over the years, the only thing =3D
    =3D3D
    bbed has provided me is the ability to run a verify on the block I have
    =3D3D
    repaired before I replace the block in the file, since dbv requires the
    =3D3D
    block to be a part of the file, otherwise I find the tool to be less =3D3D
    than useful.=3D3D20

    In the world there are about 7 Oracle BDE/RDBMS development people who =3D
    =3D3D
    can edit blocks well and only 1 or 2 others who understand and try to =3D
    =3D3D
    edit the redo stream, and in my dealings with most of them they have =3D3D
    their own tools because bbed is archaic. The lower end Support personnel
    =3D3D
    who do use bbed, normally do not have the skills or knowledge to edit =3D
    =3D3D
    the blocks in the first place.

    If you are trying to understand block structures, then you should read =3D
    =3D3D
    the documentation and the many papers that are available. There is no =3D
    =3D3D
    single source of information that will tell you everything and there are
    =3D3D
    a lot of flags and pointer values that are not documented anywhere but =3D
    =3D3D
    in the code itself. In the last year working on lots of block =3D3D
    corruptions from Linux induced problems, almost every time, the actual =3D
    =3D3D
    people who can edit blocks well, had to reference the code for =3D3D
    determination of some of the flags. It is just the reality that =3D3D
    everyone, can't know everything.
    So back to the question, what are you truly trying to find out? The tool
    =3D3D
    has no training mode and it does not document the oracle block structure
    =3D3D
    for you.=3D3D20


    -----Original Message-----
    From: oracle-l-bounce_at_freelists.org =3D3D
    On Behalf Of Tanel P=3D3DF5der
    Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2005 3:24 PM
    To: oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: Re: How can I get the BBED password?

    Hi,

    It's a really trivial task to find the password if you think about it a
    =3D3D
    bit,=3D3D20
    that's why I think it's everyone's own responsibility to find it out if
    =3D3D
    you=3D3D20
    actually need the utility. Also, the more people start messing up
    their=3D3D20
    databases with bbed, the more likely will Oracle remove it from =3D
    next=3D3D20
    distribution at all or encrypt the password or similar...

    Tanel.

    ----- Original Message -----=3D3D20
    From: "Guerra, Abraham J"
    To:
    Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2005 10:39 PM
    Subject: How can I get the BBED password?

    Hello all,

    I'm trying to dump some blocks with bbed. It asks for a password.
    According to Steve Adams, if I used strings on bbed I should find the
    password in 30 seconds... It's been 3 days... anybody know how to
    find
    it?

    TIA.
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
  • Christian Antognini at Apr 13, 2005 at 11:41 am
    Abraham
    Well, something that I've noticed with regular dumps is that when you
    update a null column in a record, the whole row is migrated within the
    block to a new location and the space in never reused... I want to use
    bbed to see if that is true...
    I agree with you, one of the major problem of regular dumps is that they =
    are formatted and some information is lost. For this reason, sometimes, =
    I use BBED to dump the block in hex...

    Now, about your problem of free space...

    When you update a row and its size is bigger then before, the updated =
    row is moved at the end of the free space at the top of the block. The =
    old position become free (it's basically a hole between the rows...).=20
    When at the beginning of the block not enough free space is available, =
    the block is reorganized, i.e. all rows are packet to the end of the =
    block. Then the updated rows can be placed in the free space at the top.
    Of course if the reorganization doesn't help or no holes are available, =
    the row is migrated to another block. The original block will contain a =
    simple pointer to the new location and some free space (another hole...) =
    will be available.

    HTH

    Chris
  • Parker, Matthew at Apr 13, 2005 at 12:43 pm
    So for what you are disucussing you can just as easily dd the block out =
    and examine it with a standard hex editor like od -x or use the standard =
    space usage query below on the object to see how much space is used =
    versus the standard information from dbms_stats and the table =
    definition. With the current bug below you can see this just as easily =
    in Oracle traces.

    There is a current bug with 9i where oracle does not reuse blocks =
    appropriately if you are using local managed tablespaces with auto =
    segment management, in operations that perform large scale deletes or =
    fast inserts and deletes within the same blocks, Oracle will bypass =
    updating the internal bitmaps for the segment and empty blocks will =
    still be marked as full. You can run the standard block space usage for =
    an object, then run this command:

    exec dbms_repair.segment_fix_status('&table_owner','&table_name');

    provided by Oracle to fix the bitmaps, and then run the space usage =
    again to see how many blocks were fixed. If you have a really large =
    object then this can become a blocking operation on your database while =
    this runs. We had one object that was over 200GB and running the =
    segment_fix_status (25 minutes) recovered over 60GB of space by simply =
    marking the bitmaps for blocks as empty.

    set serveroutput on size 1000000
    declare

    v_unformatted_blocks number;
    v_unformatted_bytes number;
    v_fs1_blocks number;
    v_fs1_bytes number;
    v_fs2_blocks number;
    v_fs2_bytes number;
    v_fs3_blocks number;
    v_fs3_bytes number;
    v_fs4_blocks number;
    v_fs4_bytes number;
    v_full_blocks number;
    v_full_bytes number;

    begin
    dbms_space.space_usage(segment_owner =3D> '&table_owner',segment_name =3D> '&table_name',segment_type =3D> 'TABLE',unformatted_blocks =3D> v_unformatted_blocks,unformatted_bytes =3D> v_unformatted_bytes,fs1_blocks =3D> v_fs1_blocks=20,fs1_bytes =3D> v_fs1_bytes =20,fs2_blocks =3D> v_fs2_blocks=20,fs2_bytes =3D> v_fs2_bytes =20,fs3_blocks =3D> v_fs3_blocks=20,fs3_bytes =3D> v_fs3_bytes =20,fs4_blocks =3D> v_fs4_blocks=20,fs4_bytes =3D> v_fs4_bytes =20,full_blocks =3D> v_full_blocks,full_bytes =3D> v_full_bytes);=20
    dbms_output.put_line(' Unformatted Blocks =3D =
    '||v_unformatted_blocks);
    dbms_output.put_line(' Unformatted Bytes =3D =
    '||v_unformatted_bytes);
    dbms_output.put_line(' Blocks Full 0-25 =3D '||v_fs1_blocks); =20
    dbms_output.put_line(' Bytes Full 0-25 =3D '||v_fs1_bytes ); =20
    dbms_output.put_line(' Blocks Full 25-50% =3D '||v_fs2_blocks); =20
    dbms_output.put_line(' Bytes Full 25-50% =3D '||v_fs2_bytes ); =20
    dbms_output.put_line(' Blocks Full 50-75% =3D '||v_fs3_blocks); =20
    dbms_output.put_line(' Bytes Full 50-75% =3D '||v_fs3_bytes ); =20
    dbms_output.put_line(' Blocks Full 75-100% =3D '||v_fs4_blocks); =20
    dbms_output.put_line(' Bytes Full 75-100% =3D '||v_fs4_bytes ); =20

    dbms_output.put_line(' Blocks Full 100% =3D '||v_full_blocks);=20
    dbms_output.put_line(' Bytes Full 100% =3D '||v_full_bytes );=20
    end;
    /

    -----Original Message-----
    From: Lex de Haan =20
    Sent: Wednesday, April 13, 2005 9:02 AM
    To: AGUERRA_at_amfam.com
    Cc: lex.de.haan_at_naturaljoin.nl; Parker, Matthew; =
    tanel.poder.003_at_mail.ee; oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: RE: How can I get the BBED password?

    please show me your tests, and the results. until proven otherwise, I
    simply don't believe it. Oracle does garbage collection at the block
    level.
    in other words, something else is going on...
    just out of curiosity, did you commit your changes?
    and again, a utility like BBED is not going to help you any further.
    formatted block dumps typically don't ly about where rows are stored :-)

    Lex.
    Hello Lex,

    I've been using the 'alter system dump' but I have seen that the = offset
    of the deleted row is never reused in my tests... =3D20

    Instead of using deleted space it jumps to the next block when needing
    new space. This is Oracle 9 I'm doing the testing with.

    Thanks for your observations.

    Abraham

    -----Original Message-----
    From: Lex de Haan =3D20
    Sent: Wednesday, April 13, 2005 10:10 AM
    To: Guerra, Abraham J
    Cc: matthewp_at_amazon.com; tanel.poder.003_at_mail.ee; =
    oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: RE: How can I get the BBED password?


    This is plain wrong. Oracle will do garbage collection at due time. = that
    is, if there is not enough free space left "in the middle" but Oracle
    knows the total free space for the block is "good enough"...

    and for this type of investigations, you don't need BBED. just "alter
    system dump ..." will do the trick.

    cheers,
    Lex.

    Thanks to all that have responded...

    Well, something that I've noticed with regular dumps is that when you
    update a null column in a record, the whole row is migrated within =
    the
    block to a new location and the space in never reused... I want to =
    use
    bbed to see if that is true...

    Thanks again to all,

    Abraham

    -----Original Message-----
    From: oracle-l-bounce_at_freelists.org
    On Behalf Of Parker, Matthew
    Sent: Wednesday, April 13, 2005 2:22 AM
    To: tanel.poder.003_at_mail.ee; oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: RE: How can I get the BBED password?


    An excellent observation Tanel.
    Abraham, what exactly are you looking to accomplish? The standard =
    dump
    =3D3D
    =3D3D3D
    utilities of Oracle provide most of what you may be looking for. Out of
    =3D3D3D
    all the block repairs I have had to do over the years, the only thing =3D3D
    =3D3D3D
    bbed has provided me is the ability to run a verify on the block I have
    =3D3D3D
    repaired before I replace the block in the file, since dbv requires the
    =3D3D3D
    block to be a part of the file, otherwise I find the tool to be less =3D3D3D
    than useful.=3D3D3D20

    In the world there are about 7 Oracle BDE/RDBMS development people =
    who
    =3D3D
    =3D3D3D
    can edit blocks well and only 1 or 2 others who understand and try to =3D3D
    =3D3D3D
    edit the redo stream, and in my dealings with most of them they have =3D3D3D
    their own tools because bbed is archaic. The lower end Support personnel
    =3D3D3D
    who do use bbed, normally do not have the skills or knowledge to edit =3D3D
    =3D3D3D
    the blocks in the first place.

    If you are trying to understand block structures, then you should =
    read
    =3D3D
    =3D3D3D
    the documentation and the many papers that are available. There is no =3D3D
    =3D3D3D
    single source of information that will tell you everything and there are
    =3D3D3D
    a lot of flags and pointer values that are not documented anywhere =
    but
    =3D3D
    =3D3D3D
    in the code itself. In the last year working on lots of block =3D3D3D
    corruptions from Linux induced problems, almost every time, the =
    actual
    =3D3D
    =3D3D3D
    people who can edit blocks well, had to reference the code for =
    =3D3D3D
    determination of some of the flags. It is just the reality that =
    =3D3D3D
    everyone, can't know everything.
    So back to the question, what are you truly trying to find out? The tool
    =3D3D3D
    has no training mode and it does not document the oracle block structure
    =3D3D3D
    for you.=3D3D3D20


    -----Original Message-----
    From: oracle-l-bounce_at_freelists.org =3D3D3D
    On Behalf Of Tanel =
    P=3D3D3DF5der
    Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2005 3:24 PM
    To: oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: Re: How can I get the BBED password?

    Hi,

    It's a really trivial task to find the password if you think about it a
    =3D3D3D
    bit,=3D3D3D20
    that's why I think it's everyone's own responsibility to find it out if
    =3D3D3D
    you=3D3D3D20
    actually need the utility. Also, the more people start messing up
    their=3D3D3D20
    databases with bbed, the more likely will Oracle remove it from =3D3D
    next=3D3D3D20
    distribution at all or encrypt the password or similar...

    Tanel.

    ----- Original Message -----=3D3D3D20
    From: "Guerra, Abraham J"
    To:
    Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2005 10:39 PM
    Subject: How can I get the BBED password?

    Hello all,

    I'm trying to dump some blocks with bbed. It asks for a password.
    According to Steve Adams, if I used strings on bbed I should find =
    the
    password in 30 seconds... It's been 3 days... anybody know how to
    find
    it?

    TIA.
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
  • Parker, Matthew at Apr 13, 2005 at 12:46 pm
    If you believe that to be the case then perform the operation and dump =
    the redolog. If it is happening you will see the row migration in the =
    redo stream.=20

    -----Original Message-----
    From: Guerra, Abraham J =20
    Sent: Wednesday, April 13, 2005 7:23 AM
    To: Parker, Matthew; tanel.poder.003_at_mail.ee; oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: RE: How can I get the BBED password?

    Thanks to all that have responded...

    Well, something that I've noticed with regular dumps is that when you
    update a null column in a record, the whole row is migrated within the
    block to a new location and the space in never reused... I want to use
    bbed to see if that is true...

    Thanks again to all,

    Abraham

    -----Original Message-----
    From: oracle-l-bounce_at_freelists.org
    On Behalf Of Parker, Matthew
    Sent: Wednesday, April 13, 2005 2:22 AM
    To: tanel.poder.003_at_mail.ee; oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: RE: How can I get the BBED password?

    An excellent observation Tanel.
    Abraham, what exactly are you looking to accomplish? The standard dump =
    =3D
    utilities of Oracle provide most of what you may be looking for. Out of
    =3D
    all the block repairs I have had to do over the years, the only thing =
    =3D
    bbed has provided me is the ability to run a verify on the block I have
    =3D
    repaired before I replace the block in the file, since dbv requires the
    =3D
    block to be a part of the file, otherwise I find the tool to be less =3D
    than useful.=3D20

    In the world there are about 7 Oracle BDE/RDBMS development people who =
    =3D
    can edit blocks well and only 1 or 2 others who understand and try to =
    =3D
    edit the redo stream, and in my dealings with most of them they have =3D
    their own tools because bbed is archaic. The lower end Support personnel
    =3D
    who do use bbed, normally do not have the skills or knowledge to edit =
    =3D
    the blocks in the first place.

    If you are trying to understand block structures, then you should read =
    =3D
    the documentation and the many papers that are available. There is no =
    =3D
    single source of information that will tell you everything and there are
    =3D
    a lot of flags and pointer values that are not documented anywhere but =
    =3D
    in the code itself. In the last year working on lots of block =3D
    corruptions from Linux induced problems, almost every time, the actual =
    =3D
    people who can edit blocks well, had to reference the code for =3D
    determination of some of the flags. It is just the reality that =3D
    everyone, can't know everything.
    So back to the question, what are you truly trying to find out? The tool
    =3D
    has no training mode and it does not document the oracle block structure
    =3D
    for you.=3D20

    -----Original Message-----
    From: oracle-l-bounce_at_freelists.org =3D
    On Behalf Of Tanel P=3DF5der
    Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2005 3:24 PM
    To: oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: Re: How can I get the BBED password?

    Hi,

    It's a really trivial task to find the password if you think about it a
    =3D
    bit,=3D20
    that's why I think it's everyone's own responsibility to find it out if
    =3D
    you=3D20
    actually need the utility. Also, the more people start messing up
    their=3D20
    databases with bbed, the more likely will Oracle remove it from =
    next=3D20
    distribution at all or encrypt the password or similar...

    Tanel.

    Original Message -----=3D20
    From: "Guerra, Abraham J"
    To:
    Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2005 10:39 PM
    Subject: How can I get the BBED password?
    Hello all,

    I'm trying to dump some blocks with bbed. It asks for a password.
    According to Steve Adams, if I used strings on bbed I should find the
    password in 30 seconds... It's been 3 days... anybody know how to find
    it?

    TIA.

    Abraham Guerra
    American Family Insurance
    Oracle DBA
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l=3D20
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
  • Guerra, Abraham J at Apr 13, 2005 at 2:35 pm
    Hello Lex,

    These are the dumps:

    Dump1: I inserted 5 rows to a table with only 1 filed (number) and
    deleted the middle three rows. See how the offsets start from the
    bottom of the block:

    0x12:pri[0] offs=3D0x1f9a
    0x14:pri[1] offs=3D0x1f94
    0x16:pri[2] offs=3D0x1f8e
    0x18:pri[3] offs=3D0x1f88
    0x1a:pri[4] offs=3D0x1f82

    block_row_dump:
    tab 0, row 0, @0x1f9a
    tl: 6 fb: --H-FL-- lb: 0x0 cc: 1
    col 0: [ 2] c1 02
    tab 0, row 1, @0x1f94
    tl: 2 fb: --HDFL-- lb: 0x2
    tab 0, row 2, @0x1f8e
    tl: 2 fb: --HDFL-- lb: 0x2
    tab 0, row 3, @0x1f88
    tl: 2 fb: --HDFL-- lb: 0x2
    tab 0, row 4, @0x1f82
    tl: 6 fb: --H-FL-- lb: 0x0 cc: 1
    col 0: [ 2] c1 06

    Now dump2, when I inserted 1000 rows, slots 1,2 and 3 were reused but
    the space offset was not:

    0xe:pti[0] nrow=3D660 offs=3D0
    0x12:pri[0] offs=3D0x1f9a
    0x14:pri[1] offs=3D0xdfb
    0x16:pri[2] offs=3D0xdf4
    0x18:pri[3] offs=3D0xded
    0x1a:pri[4] offs=3D0x1f82
    0x1c:pri[5] offs=3D0x1f7c
    0x1e:pri[6] offs=3D0x1f76
    0x20:pri[7] offs=3D0x1f70
    0x22:pri[8] offs=3D0x1f6a
    0x24:pri[9] offs=3D0x1f64
    0x26:pri[10] offs=3D0x1f5e
    0x28:pri[11] offs=3D0x1f58

    ...

    It was until it got to the 656 insert that it started to reuse the
    record slots deleted but it did not reuse the record space...

    SQL> select * from foo where rownum < 10;

    A1

    1
    656
    657
    658
    5
    1
    2
    3
    4

    So, my question is: what happened to space from 0x1f94 to 0x1f88??? I
    wanted to use bbed to see what kind of data is there...

    Thanks.

    Abraham

    -----Original Message-----
    From: Lex de Haan =20
    Sent: Wednesday, April 13, 2005 11:02 AM
    To: Guerra, Abraham J
    Cc: lex.de.haan_at_naturaljoin.nl; matthewp_at_amazon.com;
    tanel.poder.003_at_mail.ee; oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: RE: How can I get the BBED password?

    please show me your tests, and the results. until proven otherwise, I
    simply don't believe it. Oracle does garbage collection at the block
    level.
    in other words, something else is going on...
    just out of curiosity, did you commit your changes?
    and again, a utility like BBED is not going to help you any further.
    formatted block dumps typically don't ly about where rows are stored :-)

    Lex.
    Hello Lex,

    I've been using the 'alter system dump' but I have seen that the offset
    of the deleted row is never reused in my tests... =3D20

    Instead of using deleted space it jumps to the next block when needing
    new space. This is Oracle 9 I'm doing the testing with.

    Thanks for your observations.

    Abraham

    -----Original Message-----
    From: Lex de Haan =3D20
    Sent: Wednesday, April 13, 2005 10:10 AM
    To: Guerra, Abraham J
    Cc: matthewp_at_amazon.com; tanel.poder.003_at_mail.ee;
    oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: RE: How can I get the BBED password?


    This is plain wrong. Oracle will do garbage collection at due time. that
    is, if there is not enough free space left "in the middle" but Oracle
    knows the total free space for the block is "good enough"...

    and for this type of investigations, you don't need BBED. just "alter
    system dump ..." will do the trick.

    cheers,
    Lex.

    Thanks to all that have responded...

    Well, something that I've noticed with regular dumps is that when you
    update a null column in a record, the whole row is migrated within
    the
    block to a new location and the space in never reused... I want to
    use
    bbed to see if that is true...

    Thanks again to all,

    Abraham

    -----Original Message-----
    From: oracle-l-bounce_at_freelists.org
    On Behalf Of Parker, Matthew
    Sent: Wednesday, April 13, 2005 2:22 AM
    To: tanel.poder.003_at_mail.ee; oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: RE: How can I get the BBED password?


    An excellent observation Tanel.
    Abraham, what exactly are you looking to accomplish? The standard
    dump
    =3D3D
    =3D3D3D
    utilities of Oracle provide most of what you may be looking for. Out of
    =3D3D3D
    all the block repairs I have had to do over the years, the only thing =3D3D
    =3D3D3D
    bbed has provided me is the ability to run a verify on the block I have
    =3D3D3D
    repaired before I replace the block in the file, since dbv requires the
    =3D3D3D
    block to be a part of the file, otherwise I find the tool to be less =3D3D3D
    than useful.=3D3D3D20

    In the world there are about 7 Oracle BDE/RDBMS development people
    who
    =3D3D
    =3D3D3D
    can edit blocks well and only 1 or 2 others who understand and try to =3D3D
    =3D3D3D
    edit the redo stream, and in my dealings with most of them they have =3D3D3D
    their own tools because bbed is archaic. The lower end Support personnel
    =3D3D3D
    who do use bbed, normally do not have the skills or knowledge to edit =3D3D
    =3D3D3D
    the blocks in the first place.

    If you are trying to understand block structures, then you should
    read
    =3D3D
    =3D3D3D
    the documentation and the many papers that are available. There is no =3D3D
    =3D3D3D
    single source of information that will tell you everything and there are
    =3D3D3D
    a lot of flags and pointer values that are not documented anywhere
    but
    =3D3D
    =3D3D3D
    in the code itself. In the last year working on lots of block =3D3D3D
    corruptions from Linux induced problems, almost every time, the
    actual
    =3D3D
    =3D3D3D
    people who can edit blocks well, had to reference the code for =
    =3D3D3D
    determination of some of the flags. It is just the reality that =
    =3D3D3D
    everyone, can't know everything.
    So back to the question, what are you truly trying to find out? The tool
    =3D3D3D
    has no training mode and it does not document the oracle block structure
    =3D3D3D
    for you.=3D3D3D20


    -----Original Message-----
    From: oracle-l-bounce_at_freelists.org =3D3D3D
    On Behalf Of Tanel =
    P=3D3D3DF5der
    Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2005 3:24 PM
    To: oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: Re: How can I get the BBED password?

    Hi,

    It's a really trivial task to find the password if you think about it a
    =3D3D3D
    bit,=3D3D3D20
    that's why I think it's everyone's own responsibility to find it out if
    =3D3D3D
    you=3D3D3D20
    actually need the utility. Also, the more people start messing up
    their=3D3D3D20
    databases with bbed, the more likely will Oracle remove it from =3D3D
    next=3D3D3D20
    distribution at all or encrypt the password or similar...

    Tanel.

    ----- Original Message -----=3D3D3D20
    From: "Guerra, Abraham J"
    To:
    Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2005 10:39 PM
    Subject: How can I get the BBED password?

    Hello all,

    I'm trying to dump some blocks with bbed. It asks for a password.
    According to Steve Adams, if I used strings on bbed I should find
    the
    password in 30 seconds... It's been 3 days... anybody know how to
    find
    it?

    TIA.
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
  • Guerra, Abraham J at Apr 13, 2005 at 2:39 pm
    Hello Chris,

    I did not know that Oracle actually reorgs a block to pack all the rows
    and recover space between rows... That makes sense.

    Thanks.

    Abraham

    -----Original Message-----
    From: Christian Antognini =20
    Sent: Wednesday, April 13, 2005 10:38 AM
    To: Guerra, Abraham J
    Cc: oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: RE: How can I get the BBED password?

    Abraham
    Well, something that I've noticed with regular dumps is that when you
    update a null column in a record, the whole row is migrated within the
    block to a new location and the space in never reused... I want to use
    bbed to see if that is true...
    I agree with you, one of the major problem of regular dumps is that they
    are formatted and some information is lost. For this reason, sometimes,
    I use BBED to dump the block in hex...

    Now, about your problem of free space...

    When you update a row and its size is bigger then before, the updated
    row is moved at the end of the free space at the top of the block. The
    old position become free (it's basically a hole between the rows...).=20
    When at the beginning of the block not enough free space is available,
    the block is reorganized, i.e. all rows are packet to the end of the
    block. Then the updated rows can be placed in the free space at the top.
    Of course if the reorganization doesn't help or no holes are available,
    the row is migrated to another block. The original block will contain a
    simple pointer to the new location and some free space (another hole...)
    will be available.

    HTH

    Chris
  • Parker, Matthew at Apr 13, 2005 at 3:31 pm
    Oracle does not always reorg the rows in a block. There are different =
    optimizations that oracle uses as to when certain internal block =
    manipulations are performed.=20

    -----Original Message-----
    From: oracle-l-bounce_at_freelists.org =
    On Behalf Of Guerra, Abraham J
    Sent: Wednesday, April 13, 2005 11:36 AM
    To: Christian Antognini
    Cc: oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: RE: How can I get the BBED password?

    Hello Chris,

    I did not know that Oracle actually reorgs a block to pack all the rows
    and recover space between rows... That makes sense.

    Thanks.

    Abraham

    -----Original Message-----
    From: Christian Antognini =3D20
    Sent: Wednesday, April 13, 2005 10:38 AM
    To: Guerra, Abraham J
    Cc: oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: RE: How can I get the BBED password?

    Abraham
    Well, something that I've noticed with regular dumps is that when you
    update a null column in a record, the whole row is migrated within the
    block to a new location and the space in never reused... I want to use
    bbed to see if that is true...
    I agree with you, one of the major problem of regular dumps is that they
    are formatted and some information is lost. For this reason, sometimes,
    I use BBED to dump the block in hex...

    Now, about your problem of free space...

    When you update a row and its size is bigger then before, the updated
    row is moved at the end of the free space at the top of the block. The
    old position become free (it's basically a hole between the =
    rows...).=3D20
    When at the beginning of the block not enough free space is available,
    the block is reorganized, i.e. all rows are packet to the end of the
    block. Then the updated rows can be placed in the free space at the top.
    Of course if the reorganization doesn't help or no holes are available,
    the row is migrated to another block. The original block will contain a
    simple pointer to the new location and some free space (another hole...)
    will be available.

    HTH

    Chris
  • Tanel Põder at Apr 13, 2005 at 7:09 pm
    Hi,

    This is called block coalescing. If I recall correctly, Oracle only tries to
    coalesce a block if it sees that the block does have enough total free space
    for insert/update operation, but there is no contiguous free chunk big
    enough available. Also it might work the same way for expanding ITL area as
    well, but I havent tried it..

    Tanel.

    Original Message -----
    From: "Parker, Matthew"
    To:; "Christian Antognini"

    Cc:
    Sent: Wednesday, April 13, 2005 8:27 PM
    Subject: RE: How can I get the BBED password?
    Oracle does not always reorg the rows in a block. There are different =
    optimizations that oracle uses as to when certain internal block =
    manipulations are performed.=20

    -----Original Message-
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
  • Gogala, Mladen at Apr 13, 2005 at 3:46 pm
    --
    Mladen Gogala
    Ext. 121
    -----Original Message-----
    From: Tanel Põder
    Sent: Wednesday, April 13, 2005 1:25 PM
    To: Guerra, Abraham J; oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: Re: How can I get the BBED password?

    Yep, I've used BBED - only for having some fun, there's not much serious
    stuff you can/should do with it.
    [Mladen Gogala]

    Instead of bbed, one can use

    dd if=/dev/zero bs=8192 count=100 of=/mydir/system01.dbf

    Recovery workshop will be just as effective with dd as it would be with
    bbed.
  • Mhthomas at Apr 14, 2005 at 12:11 am
    in-line
    On 4/13/05, Gogala, Mladen wrote:

    =20
    --
    Mladen Gogala
    Ext. 121 ...
    Instead of bbed, one can use
    =20
    dd if=3D/dev/zero bs=3D8192 count=3D100 of=3D/mydir/system01.dbf
    =20
    Recovery workshop will be just as effective with dd as it would be with
    bbed.
    Yes. The Adv RMAN class I took had a script for doing this in the lab.
    We'd mess up a couple blocks and recover just bad blocks. Actually,
    I'd like to test flashback stuff in 10g, too.

    Plus, the above command syntax will be required frequently with crs
    (ocr, voting file) reinstalls.

    For what its worth, someone told me bbed long ago and I don't remember. :-)

    Regards,

    Mike Thomas
  • Christian Antognini at Apr 13, 2005 at 6:49 pm
    Hi Abraham
    Now dump2, when I inserted 1000 rows, slots 1,2 and 3 were reused but
    the space offset was not: [snip]
    So, my question is: what happened to space from 0x1f94 to 0x1f88??? I
    wanted to use bbed to see what kind of data is there...
    In this second dump, what are the values of fsbo, fseo, avsp, tosp?
    My guess is that you have plenty of free space in that block...

    HTH

    Chris
  • Slava Zayarny at Apr 14, 2005 at 10:00 am
    Wolfgang,

    I have recently been looking at what types of corruption RMAN notices
    and how it reports them. I used dd and BBED to experiment with =
    intentional
    block corruption in 9.2.0.6/HP-UX 11.11.

    I have not had the time to conclude all the trials I want but BBED only =
    marks=20
    a block "FRACTURED" as seen in V$DATABASE_BLOCK_CORRUPTION
    after RMAN's "BACKUP VALIDATE CHECK LOGICAL DATABASE" is run. =20

    For this type of corruption RMAN does NOT fail with an error after =
    backup=20
    validation: it logs an entry to the alert log and inserts rows into=20
    V$DATABASE_BLOCK_CORRUPTION and V$BACKUP_CORRUPTION. Alert log would =
    show
    such intentionally fractured block in the alert log as:

    "Bad header found during backing up datafile"

    without the usual "ORA-XXX".

    RMAN behaved differently in a recent case where corrupted block was
    reported in alert log as:

    "Bad header found during buffer read"

    In that case RMAN failed with "ORA-19566: exceeded limit of 0 corrupt =
    blocks for file".
    It was also reported with "ORA-XXX" into the alert log. Unfortunately, =
    I don't have=20
    details on how it was reported in V$DATABASE_BLOCK_CORRUPTION.

    I think it's important to know what kind of corruption RMAN can and =
    cannot
    report without the need to add auto monitoring of the alert log beyond =
    the standard
    "ORA-XXX" strings.

    What I want to figure out conclusively by simulation is how RMAN reports =
    the=20
    other four types of corruption (as seen in V$DATABASE_BLOCK_CORRUPTION):

    ALL ZERO, CHECKSUM, CORRUPT, LOGICAL

    I will share my findings when I'm done, but in the meantime, I would =
    welcome
    your comments if you have any.

    Cheers,

    Slava Zayarny
    Oracle DBA

    Date: Wed, 13 Apr 2005 12:43:24 -0600
    From: Wolfgang Breitling
    Subject: Re: How can I get the BBED password?

    I have used it to deliberately corrupt a block to find out how RMAN=20
    report block corruptions. Of course there are other ways to corrupt=20
    blocks but it seemed like a good excuse to build and use bbed.

    Guerra, Abraham J wrote:
    Hello Tanel,
    =20
    Have you used the utility? If so, did you discover the password or = =3D
    somebody else told it to you?
    =20
    Thanks.
    =20
    Abraham
    =20
    --=20
    Regards

    Wolfgang Breitling
    Centrex Consulting Corporation
    www.centrexcc.com
  • Parker, Matthew at Apr 15, 2005 at 12:29 am
    We use monitors on v$database_block_corruption to see corruption that =
    RMAN does not report in it's logs, but does always appear to report in =
    the view, which is really rows stored in the controlfile.

    -----Original Message-----
    From: oracle-l-bounce_at_freelists.org =
    On Behalf Of Slava Zayarny
    Sent: Thursday, April 14, 2005 6:56 AM
    To: Oracle-L_at_freelists.org
    Cc: breitliw_at_centrexcc.com
    Subject: Re: How can I get the BBED password?

    Wolfgang,

    I have recently been looking at what types of corruption RMAN notices
    and how it reports them. I used dd and BBED to experiment with =3D
    intentional
    block corruption in 9.2.0.6/HP-UX 11.11.

    I have not had the time to conclude all the trials I want but BBED only =
    =3D
    marks=3D20
    a block "FRACTURED" as seen in V$DATABASE_BLOCK_CORRUPTION
    after RMAN's "BACKUP VALIDATE CHECK LOGICAL DATABASE" is run. =3D20

    For this type of corruption RMAN does NOT fail with an error after =3D
    backup=3D20
    validation: it logs an entry to the alert log and inserts rows into=3D20
    V$DATABASE_BLOCK_CORRUPTION and V$BACKUP_CORRUPTION. Alert log would =
    =3D
    show
    such intentionally fractured block in the alert log as:

    "Bad header found during backing up datafile"

    without the usual "ORA-XXX".

    RMAN behaved differently in a recent case where corrupted block was
    reported in alert log as:

    "Bad header found during buffer read"

    In that case RMAN failed with "ORA-19566: exceeded limit of 0 corrupt =
    =3D
    blocks for file".
    It was also reported with "ORA-XXX" into the alert log. Unfortunately, =
    =3D
    I don't have=3D20
    details on how it was reported in V$DATABASE_BLOCK_CORRUPTION.

    I think it's important to know what kind of corruption RMAN can and =3D
    cannot
    report without the need to add auto monitoring of the alert log beyond =
    =3D
    the standard
    "ORA-XXX" strings.

    What I want to figure out conclusively by simulation is how RMAN reports =
    =3D
    the=3D20
    other four types of corruption (as seen in V$DATABASE_BLOCK_CORRUPTION):

    ALL ZERO, CHECKSUM, CORRUPT, LOGICAL

    I will share my findings when I'm done, but in the meantime, I would =3D
    welcome
    your comments if you have any.

    Cheers,

    Slava Zayarny
    Oracle DBA

    Date: Wed, 13 Apr 2005 12:43:24 -0600
    From: Wolfgang Breitling
    Subject: Re: How can I get the BBED password?

    I have used it to deliberately corrupt a block to find out how RMAN=3D20
    report block corruptions. Of course there are other ways to corrupt=3D20
    blocks but it seemed like a good excuse to build and use bbed.

    Guerra, Abraham J wrote:
    Hello Tanel,
    =3D20
    Have you used the utility? If so, did you discover the password or =
    =3D
    =3D3D
    somebody else told it to you?
    =3D20
    Thanks.
    =3D20
    Abraham
    =3D20
    --=3D20
    Regards

    Wolfgang Breitling
    Centrex Consulting Corporation
    www.centrexcc.com
  • Guerra, Abraham J at Apr 19, 2005 at 9:33 am
    Hello Niall,


    Yes, somebody gave it to me... I ran the strings command on the bbed
    executable and the password was not there... There were many strings but
    not the string that is the password.


    Thanks.


    Abraham
    -----Original Message-----
    From: Niall Litchfield
    Sent: Tuesday, April 19, 2005 8:15 AM
    To: vitalisman_at_gmail.com
    Cc: Guerra, Abraham J; oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: Re: How can I get the BBED password?

    Hi Abraham,


    Did you manage to find the password eventually?
    I've read that others hadn't given it to you because they
    assumed the
    password can be easily found in the ascii codes of the binary
    file.
    That's not true on all environments.

    I read it differently. I read it as being, essentially, if you ain't
    smart enough to find or crack the password, we'll keep it secret because
    its an internal only hacker level tool.

    --
    Niall Litchfield
    Oracle DBA
    http://www.niall.litchfield.dial.pipex.com

    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l

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