FAQ
Hey guys,


Quick question. We are working on an effort that will have a multiple
Terabyte database. I am seeing conflicting information about the max size
of a data file that Oracle will support. I see where a "vendor" indicates a
1.9TB data file in their proposal. But what I'm finding in the Oracle Doc is
approx 127GB (32K block size). And the typical search of the web turns up
yet a different answer.....



So, I'm making the assumption of "4 million blocks max per data file" * the
block size to derive the max oracle data file size (I'm not worried about
the OS limitations at this time).



Am I off track here? Making an incorrect assumption?



Thanks!

Greg Loughmiller

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  • Gogala, Mladen at Dec 8, 2004 at 8:46 am
    Of course, you can have bigfile tablespace, containing a single moderatly
    large file, containing up to 4G blocks, up to 32kb long. This makes the
    largest supported file size equal to 128 TB. There is, however, a catch:
    you will have to upgrade to 10G to do that. Bigfile tablespaces are not
    supported in 9.2. If you do upgrade and use bigfile tablespaces, be aware
    that there are significant limitations with ROWID columns. Contrary to the
    popular belief, size does matter.
    --
    Mladen Gogala
    Ext. 121

    -----Original Message-----
    From: Loughmiller, Greg
    Sent: Wednesday, December 08, 2004 9:18 AM
    To: 'oracle-l_at_freelists.org'
    Subject: Oracle9i data file size limitations on HPUX 11.11

    Hey guys,


    Quick question. We are working on an effort that will have a multiple
    Terabyte database. I am seeing conflicting information about the max size
    of a data file that Oracle will support. I see where a "vendor" indicates a
    1.9TB data file in their proposal. But what I'm finding in the Oracle Doc is
    approx 127GB (32K block size). And the typical search of the web turns up
    yet a different answer.....



    So, I'm making the assumption of "4 million blocks max per data file" * the
    block size to derive the max oracle data file size (I'm not worried about
    the OS limitations at this time).



    Am I off track here? Making an incorrect assumption?



    Thanks!

    Greg Loughmiller





    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l

    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
  • Jared Still at Dec 9, 2004 at 5:41 pm
    How long does it take to restore a a 128 TB file?

    42 minutes
    42 hours
    42 days
    42 months
    42 years
    f ) 42 lifetimes
    all of the above

    Jared

    On Wed, 8 Dec 2004 09:45:59 -0500, Gogala, Mladen
    wrote:
    Of course, you can have bigfile tablespace, containing a single moderatly
    large file, containing up to 4G blocks, up to 32kb long. This makes the
    largest supported file size equal to 128 TB. There is, however, a catch:
    you will have to upgrade to 10G to do that. Bigfile tablespaces are not
    supported in 9.2. If you do upgrade and use bigfile tablespaces, be aware
    that there are significant limitations with ROWID columns. Contrary to the
    popular belief, size does matter.
    --
    Mladen Gogala
    Ext. 121



    -----Original Message-----
    From: Loughmiller, Greg
    Sent: Wednesday, December 08, 2004 9:18 AM
    To: 'oracle-l_at_freelists.org'
    Subject: Oracle9i data file size limitations on HPUX 11.11

    Hey guys,

    Quick question. We are working on an effort that will have a multiple
    Terabyte database. I am seeing conflicting information about the max size
    of a data file that Oracle will support. I see where a "vendor" indicates a
    1.9TB data file in their proposal. But what I'm finding in the Oracle Doc is
    approx 127GB (32K block size). And the typical search of the web turns up
    yet a different answer.....

    So, I'm making the assumption of "4 million blocks max per data file" * the
    block size to derive the max oracle data file size (I'm not worried about
    the OS limitations at this time).

    Am I off track here? Making an incorrect assumption?

    Thanks!

    Greg Loughmiller

    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l

    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
    --
    Jared Still
    Certifiable Oracle DBA and Part Time Perl Evangelist
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
  • Gogala, Mladen at Dec 10, 2004 at 9:46 am
    As of Oracle RDBMS 9i, time is expressed in microseconds, rather then
    seconds, years or lifetimes. BTW, you left out the infamous "dog years".
    Backing up and restoring a single 128TB file would be an interesting
    exercise. Please, do it and then post the result, appropriately expressed
    in microseconds, using, of course, the binary notation. That way, we will
    be able to know the exact answer to your question. Everybody will enjoy
    screen upon screen of zeroes and ones.
    --
    Mladen Gogala
    Ext. 121

    -----Original Message-----
    From: Jared Still
    Sent: Thursday, December 09, 2004 6:43 PM
    To: MGogala_at_allegientsystems.com
    Cc: greg.loughmiller_at_cingular.com; oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: Re: Oracle9i data file size limitations on HPUX 11.11

    How long does it take to restore a a 128 TB file?

    42 minutes
    42 hours
    42 days
    42 months
    42 years
    f ) 42 lifetimes
    all of the above

    Jared

    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
  • Carel-Jan Engel at Dec 10, 2004 at 10:13 am
    For a scientific answer, the test should be performed at least 10 times.
    Posting just the average time is enough if there is no more than 2%
    difference in the results. Otherwise I would like an examination of the
    differences, eg the tape operator fell asleep while changing the tapes
    in the robot, or other root causes of different resulting elapsed times.
    Best regards,

    Carel-Jan Engel

    ===
    If you think education is expensive, try ignorance. (Derek Bok)
    ===
    On Fri, 2004-12-10 at 16:46, Gogala, Mladen wrote:

    As of Oracle RDBMS 9i, time is expressed in microseconds, rather then
    seconds, years or lifetimes. BTW, you left out the infamous "dog years".
    Backing up and restoring a single 128TB file would be an interesting
    exercise. Please, do it and then post the result, appropriately expressed
    in microseconds, using, of course, the binary notation. That way, we will
    be able to know the exact answer to your question. Everybody will enjoy
    screen upon screen of zeroes and ones.
    --
    Mladen Gogala
    Ext. 121

    -----Original Message-----
    From: Jared Still
    Sent: Thursday, December 09, 2004 6:43 PM
    To: MGogala_at_allegientsystems.com
    Cc: greg.loughmiller_at_cingular.com; oracle-l_at_freelists.org
    Subject: Re: Oracle9i data file size limitations on HPUX 11.11

    How long does it take to restore a a 128 TB file?

    a) 42 minutes
    b) 42 hours
    c) 42 days
    d) 42 months
    e) 42 years
    f ) 42 lifetimes
    g) all of the above

    Jared



    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
  • Alexander Gorbachev at Dec 12, 2004 at 1:53 pm
    Our limit for 4K block is 16Gb (Oracle limit). Or limit for 8k is 32Gb
    (HP-UX limit) minus first 8k or something which Oracle skips.
    This is true for raw devices and filesystems.

    --
    Best regards,
    Alex Gorbachev

    On Wed, 8 Dec 2004 08:17:39 -0600, Loughmiller, Greg
    wrote:
    Hey guys,

    Quick question. We are working on an effort that will have a multiple
    Terabyte database. I am seeing conflicting information about the max size
    of a data file that Oracle will support. I see where a "vendor" indicates a
    1.9TB data file in their proposal. But what I'm finding in the Oracle Doc is
    approx 127GB (32K block size). And the typical search of the web turns up
    yet a different answer.....
    --
    http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l

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