FAQ
Allans post brings a nice situation back in memory. I got hired as a
contractor, together with an interim manager, at a communal datacentre,
where they had fired all DBA/SA staff (5 people) because of, let's say,
suboptimal formance. Task: hire new staff and set up proper management
and procedures.
They had some nice home-grown helpdesk software running. After a couple
of weeks, up and running again with some contractors, statistics
(ratio's) derived from the helpdesk system worsened severely. Management
got concerned, because the new staff performed far worse than the fired
staff ever did. I started a small inquiry among some senior users, and
we found the root cause of the raising wait times in the helpdesk calls:
The users started to experience that problems, once reported, actually
got solved, mostly within a couple of hours in stead of days or weeks,
and started to feed us with drawers full of still unresolved problems,
many of them up to a year or more of age. This of course saturated the
capacity of the new staff, resulting in queuing, context switching, and
bad performance.

The frustration about the old staff had simply suspended the problem
reporting. Only severe problems (standstills) got reported, reporting
anything else had proven to be a waste of time. The change in capacity
initiated an increasing demand. After the bulk load was solved some
weeks later, user satisfaction raised, the number of calls lowered and
response-times were OK.

Yes, communication with users can be very helpfull. In this case it
helped to twist the mind of management into a better mood than ever
before!

Best regards,

Carel-Jan Engel

===
If you think education is expensive, try ignorance. (Derek Bok)
===
I think a set of representative queries with based line response time
is
good if you can afford the extra load and the deck of queries is
reasonably stable. Otherwise cultivate relationships with your most
verbal users. They'll call once they know you care.

Allan
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  • Paul Drake at Aug 26, 2004 at 2:07 am
    Carel-Jan Engel
    wrote:
    The change in capacity
    initiated an increasing demand. snip
    Best regards,
    Carel-Jan Engel
    sounds like what happens when there are no problems
    from a hardware / Oracle Database Server software
    migration.

    "this runs so much faster on the new server".

    "I can now run ten times as many schedules in the same
    amount of time".

    "I can now run the reports that used to be too slow".

    a gas will expand to fill the capacity of the
    container.

    users will run the CPUs, memory bandwidth, storage
    subsystem IO until it bogs down. again.

    would we expect anything less?

    Pd

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postedAug 25, '04 at 3:40p
activeAug 26, '04 at 2:07a
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websiteoracle.com

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Paul Drake: 1 post Carel-Jan Engel: 1 post

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