Which is better for a production installation of CloudFoundry?
I've successfully installed a test cloud with Chef, bosh will be better?
Are there any tutorial on how to install cloudfoundry in a multiserver
environment with BOSH?

Search Discussions

  • Lei Zhang at Nov 3, 2012 at 9:01 am
    BOSH is a very powerful tool to install a CF system for you which is distributed among several VMs. By using chef you can install CF on one VM or PC easilly, but if you need a multi-node system, you'll find it is really a tough work just like bellow:
    http://resouer.blogspot.com/2012/07/building-multi-node-cloudfoundry-based.html

    What's more, BOSH allows you to update the source code of CF system without re-install your VMs. This is a very important feature.

    But as BOSH need to know how to creat VMs base on your IaaS, you need to make sure your IaaS is supported by BOSH. Currently, only VSphere, AWS, OpenStack can make sense.





    --
    Harry Zhang (Zhang Lei)

    Cloud Team
    VLIS Lab
    ZheJiang University

    At 2012-11-03 03:24:20,gandalf.corvotempesta@gmail.com wrote:
    Which is better for a production installation of CloudFoundry?
    I've successfully installed a test cloud with Chef, bosh will be better?
    Are there any tutorial on how to install cloudfoundry in a multiserver environment with BOSH?
  • Gandalf Corvotempesta at Nov 3, 2012 at 4:25 pm
    Il giorno sabato 3 novembre 2012 10:01:23 UTC+1, Lei Zhang ha scritto:
    What's more, BOSH allows you to update the source code of CF system
    without re-install your VMs. This is a very important feature.
    Actually i've deployed a multiserver testbed with chef with no issue.
    Upgrading code is easy as re-run the build system, I don't have to
    reinstall VMs.


    But as BOSH need to know how to creat VMs base on your IaaS, you need to
    make sure your IaaS is supported by BOSH. Currently, only VSphere, AWS,
    OpenStack can make sense.
    I have a private cloud, so I can't use BOSH ?
  • Ben Langfeld at Nov 3, 2012 at 4:31 pm
    You're going to have to be more specific about 'Private Cloud'. Are you
    using vSphere, OpenStack or CloudStack?

    Regards,
    Ben Langfeld

    On 3 November 2012 08:25, wrote:

    Il giorno sabato 3 novembre 2012 10:01:23 UTC+1, Lei Zhang ha scritto:
    What's more, BOSH allows you to update the source code of CF system
    without re-install your VMs. This is a very important feature.
    Actually i've deployed a multiserver testbed with chef with no issue.
    Upgrading code is easy as re-run the build system, I don't have to
    reinstall VMs.


    But as BOSH need to know how to creat VMs base on your IaaS, you need to
    make sure your IaaS is supported by BOSH. Currently, only VSphere, AWS,
    OpenStack can make sense.
    I have a private cloud, so I can't use BOSH ?
  • Gandalf Corvotempesta at Nov 4, 2012 at 6:51 pm
    Il giorno sabato 3 novembre 2012 17:31:19 UTC+1, Ben Langfeld ha scritto:
    You're going to have to be more specific about 'Private Cloud'. Are you
    using vSphere, OpenStack or CloudStack?

    Nothing of above. I'm using a bounch of XCP, Xen and KVM with custom-made
    orchestration scripts
  • 磊张 at Nov 4, 2012 at 12:24 pm
    If your IaaS is not in the supported group above, using BOSH requires your
    own effort to write a bundle of code (we called it BOSH CPI).

    BYW, do you mean that you update your code of CF by re-running the chef
    scripts?



    在 2012年11月4日星期日UTC+8上午12时25分49秒,gandalf.co...@gmail.com写道:
    Il giorno sabato 3 novembre 2012 10:01:23 UTC+1, Lei Zhang ha scritto:
    What's more, BOSH allows you to update the source code of CF system
    without re-install your VMs. This is a very important feature.
    Actually i've deployed a multiserver testbed with chef with no issue.
    Upgrading code is easy as re-run the build system, I don't have to
    reinstall VMs.


    But as BOSH need to know how to creat VMs base on your IaaS, you need to
    make sure your IaaS is supported by BOSH. Currently, only VSphere, AWS,
    OpenStack can make sense.
    I have a private cloud, so I can't use BOSH ?
  • Gandalf Corvotempesta at Nov 4, 2012 at 6:52 pm
    Il giorno domenica 4 novembre 2012 13:24:43 UTC+1, 磊张 ha scritto:
    BYW, do you mean that you update your code of CF by re-running the chef
    scripts?
    Yes, when I need to update CF i'll re-run the chef scripts.
  • Vadim Spivak at Nov 3, 2012 at 4:58 pm
    If this is a production env then you should use BOSH.

    -Vadim

    On Nov 2, 2012, at 12:24 PM, "gandalf.corvotempesta@gmail.com"
    wrote:
    Which is better for a production installation of CloudFoundry?
    I've successfully installed a test cloud with Chef, bosh will be better?
    Are there any tutorial on how to install cloudfoundry in a multiserver environment with BOSH?
  • Gandalf Corvotempesta at Nov 4, 2012 at 6:53 pm
    Il giorno sabato 3 novembre 2012 17:58:20 UTC+1, Vadim Spivak ha scritto:
    If this is a production env then you should use BOSH.

    Any tutorial on how to install a multinode CF environment with BOSH?
    I don't know anything about bosh and I don't how to install a CF
    environment
  • Lei Zhang at Nov 5, 2012 at 2:58 am
    The very initiative guidance is https://github.com/cloudfoundry/oss-docs/blob/master/bosh/documentation/documentation.md
    There you'll get knowledge of BOSh, BOSH CPI and how it works.
    And then you can Google for CloudFoundry BOSH then you'll find tutorials based on AWS, Vsphere.




    --
    Harry Zhang (Zhang Lei)

    Cloud Team
    VLIS Lab
    ZheJiang University

    在 2012-11-05 02:53:49,gandalf.corvotempesta@gmail.com 写道:
    Il giorno sabato 3 novembre 2012 17:58:20 UTC+1, Vadim Spivak ha scritto:If this is a production env then you should use BOSH.


    Any tutorial on how to install a multinode CF environment with BOSH?
    I don't know anything about bosh and I don't how to install a CF environment
  • Gandalf Corvotempesta at Nov 5, 2012 at 5:17 pm

    On Monday, November 5, 2012 3:58:38 AM UTC+1, Lei Zhang wrote:

    The very initiative guidance is
    https://github.com/cloudfoundry/oss-docs/blob/master/bosh/documentation/documentation.md
    There you'll get knowledge of BOSh, BOSH CPI and how it works.
    And then you can Google for CloudFoundry BOSH then you'll find tutorials
    based on AWS, Vsphere.
    But the only differences between bosh and chef is that bosh is able to
    provide VPS automatically?
    any differences in CF code between both method? What happens If I use Chef
    to build a production environment?
  • Ben Langfeld at Nov 5, 2012 at 5:24 pm
    The CF code that is deployed is the same, it's just a different deployment
    tool. You should not consider CF and BOSH linked other than the fact that
    there is a pre-written set of BOSH config for deploying CF and that is what
    is used by the cloudfoundry.com team to deploy their production environment.

    Chef is a perfectly good tool for doing this, but there is some funky stuff
    in the dev_setup chef config which is not appropriate for production. Some
    people have independent chef cookbooks for cloudfoundry, but these are not
    well organised. They should replace the dev_setup stuff at some point
    (dev_setup should be a customisation of more general cookbooks) but the
    core team are not interested in chef for production deployments.

    Regards,
    Ben Langfeld

    On 5 November 2012 09:17, wrote:
    On Monday, November 5, 2012 3:58:38 AM UTC+1, Lei Zhang wrote:

    The very initiative guidance is https://github.com/**
    cloudfoundry/oss-docs/blob/**master/bosh/documentation/**documentation.md<https://github.com/cloudfoundry/oss-docs/blob/master/bosh/documentation/documentation.md>
    There you'll get knowledge of BOSh, BOSH CPI and how it works.
    And then you can Google for CloudFoundry BOSH then you'll find tutorials
    based on AWS, Vsphere.
    But the only differences between bosh and chef is that bosh is able to
    provide VPS automatically?
    any differences in CF code between both method? What happens If I use Chef
    to build a production environment?
  • Gandalf Corvotempesta at Nov 6, 2012 at 4:28 pm

    On Monday, November 5, 2012 6:24:09 PM UTC+1, Ben Langfeld wrote:

    The CF code that is deployed is the same, it's just a different deployment
    tool. You should not consider CF and BOSH linked other than the fact that
    there is a pre-written set of BOSH config for deploying CF and that is what
    is used by the cloudfoundry.com team to deploy their production
    environment.

    Ok.

    Chef is a perfectly good tool for doing this, but there is some funky
    stuff in the dev_setup chef config which is not appropriate for production.
    For example? The testbed setup that i'm using right now seems to work
    properly.
  • Jeremy Voorhis at Nov 6, 2012 at 4:46 pm
    There are many differences between the dev_setup Chef cookbooks and the
    BOSH release for VCAP. For example, CloudController and SDS will be
    deployed behind an Nginx proxy to handle uploading and downloading large
    files. NFS is also included in the release. A handful of kernel settings
    are tuned. Processes are all supervised by Monit.

    Both dev_setup and BOSH will lead you to a functional Chef deploy, but the
    configuration and the work involved in maintaining and scaling will be
    different.

    On Tue, Nov 6, 2012 at 8:28 AM, wrote:
    On Monday, November 5, 2012 6:24:09 PM UTC+1, Ben Langfeld wrote:

    The CF code that is deployed is the same, it's just a different
    deployment tool. You should not consider CF and BOSH linked other than the
    fact that there is a pre-written set of BOSH config for deploying CF and
    that is what is used by the cloudfoundry.com team to deploy their
    production environment.

    Ok.

    Chef is a perfectly good tool for doing this, but there is some funky
    stuff in the dev_setup chef config which is not appropriate for production.
    For example? The testbed setup that i'm using right now seems to work
    properly.


    --
    Jeremy Voorhis
    Sr Engineer – AppFog
    +1 503.319.0075
  • Jesse Zhang at Nov 6, 2012 at 5:03 pm
    Hi Jeremy,
    Yes at some point CC wasn't using nginx in dev_setup but that has changed
    for quite a long time now. In hindsight, there's no reason not to use nginx
    because of the memory pressure (and possible leaks in a few versions of
    MRI) caused by send_file .

    Jesse
    On Tue, Nov 6, 2012 at 8:45 AM, Jeremy Voorhis wrote:

    There are many differences between the dev_setup Chef cookbooks and the
    BOSH release for VCAP. For example, CloudController and SDS will be
    deployed behind an Nginx proxy to handle uploading and downloading large
    files. NFS is also included in the release. A handful of kernel settings
    are tuned. Processes are all supervised by Monit.

    Both dev_setup and BOSH will lead you to a functional Chef deploy, but the
    configuration and the work involved in maintaining and scaling will be
    different.

    On Tue, Nov 6, 2012 at 8:28 AM, wrote:
    On Monday, November 5, 2012 6:24:09 PM UTC+1, Ben Langfeld wrote:

    The CF code that is deployed is the same, it's just a different
    deployment tool. You should not consider CF and BOSH linked other than the
    fact that there is a pre-written set of BOSH config for deploying CF and
    that is what is used by the cloudfoundry.com team to deploy their
    production environment.

    Ok.

    Chef is a perfectly good tool for doing this, but there is some funky
    stuff in the dev_setup chef config which is not appropriate for production.
    For example? The testbed setup that i'm using right now seems to work
    properly.


    --
    Jeremy Voorhis
    Sr Engineer – AppFog
    +1 503.319.0075
  • Jeremy Voorhis at Nov 6, 2012 at 5:31 pm
    Thanks for the correction. I've seen that issue with send_file before, so I'm glad it's been patched!

    ---
    Jeremy Voorhis
    @jvoorhis
    m: 503.319.0075
    On Nov 6, 2012, at 9:03 AM, Jesse Zhang wrote:

    Hi Jeremy,
    Yes at some point CC wasn't using nginx in dev_setup but that has changed for quite a long time now. In hindsight, there's no reason not to use nginx because of the memory pressure (and possible leaks in a few versions of MRI) caused by send_file .

    Jesse
    On Tue, Nov 6, 2012 at 8:45 AM, Jeremy Voorhis wrote:
    There are many differences between the dev_setup Chef cookbooks and the BOSH release for VCAP. For example, CloudController and SDS will be deployed behind an Nginx proxy to handle uploading and downloading large files. NFS is also included in the release. A handful of kernel settings are tuned. Processes are all supervised by Monit.

    Both dev_setup and BOSH will lead you to a functional Chef deploy, but the configuration and the work involved in maintaining and scaling will be different.

    On Tue, Nov 6, 2012 at 8:28 AM, wrote:
    On Monday, November 5, 2012 6:24:09 PM UTC+1, Ben Langfeld wrote:
    The CF code that is deployed is the same, it's just a different deployment tool. You should not consider CF and BOSH linked other than the fact that there is a pre-written set of BOSH config for deploying CF and that is what is used by the cloudfoundry.com team to deploy their production environment. Ok.
    Chef is a perfectly good tool for doing this, but there is some funky stuff in the dev_setup chef config which is not appropriate for production.
    For example? The testbed setup that i'm using right now seems to work properly.


    --
    Jeremy Voorhis
    Sr Engineer – AppFog
    +1 503.319.0075
  • Andrea Campi at Nov 6, 2012 at 5:42 pm
    Just to confuse the matter further…

    I am finally getting traction on cleaning up and releasing my rewrite of
    the Chef cookbooks (based on Trotter Cashion's ones).

    These cookbooks are geared towards production (we have been using them
    exclusively for a very long time in production), and we keep them up to
    date with all the changes.
    Compared to dev_setup, the main advantages are:

    * unit tests with test-kitchen;
    * the main target is Chef Server, although they will still work with Chef
    Solo;
    * what this means in practice is that we use search extensively;
    * in general, they follow the established "best practices" of Chef,
    including but not limited to Foodcritic;
    * we reuse existing cookbooks as much as possible, as well as the rest the
    ecosystem—for example, Upstart;
    * once done, they will be on the Opscode community site.


    This effort is not meant to compete with BOSH in any way—we just haven't
    been able to spend time on BOSH yet, while Chef is one of our main
    bread-winners :)

    Andrea
  • Ben Langfeld at Nov 6, 2012 at 5:44 pm
    Andrea, do you have any ETA on that release? Is there anything I can do to
    help expedite it?

    Regards,
    Ben Langfeld

    On 6 November 2012 09:42, Andrea Campi wrote:

    Just to confuse the matter further…

    I am finally getting traction on cleaning up and releasing my rewrite of
    the Chef cookbooks (based on Trotter Cashion's ones).

    These cookbooks are geared towards production (we have been using them
    exclusively for a very long time in production), and we keep them up to
    date with all the changes.
    Compared to dev_setup, the main advantages are:

    * unit tests with test-kitchen;
    * the main target is Chef Server, although they will still work with Chef
    Solo;
    * what this means in practice is that we use search extensively;
    * in general, they follow the established "best practices" of Chef,
    including but not limited to Foodcritic;
    * we reuse existing cookbooks as much as possible, as well as the rest the
    ecosystem—for example, Upstart;
    * once done, they will be on the Opscode community site.


    This effort is not meant to compete with BOSH in any way—we just haven't
    been able to spend time on BOSH yet, while Chef is one of our main
    bread-winners :)

    Andrea
  • Andrea Campi at Nov 6, 2012 at 5:53 pm

    On Tue, Nov 6, 2012 at 6:44 PM, Ben Langfeld wrote:

    Andrea, do you have any ETA on that release? Is there anything I can do to
    help expedite it?
    My plan is to spend a couple of hours every night focusing on one cookbook
    at a time, cleaning it up, scrubbing it free of any proprietary stuff, and
    finish writing tests.

    I will release them as soon as I have the mandatory components + Ruby +
    MongoDB ready—then I will go on with the others, releasing them one at a
    time as they are ready.
    So I would say 7-10 days to the first release.

    Any other time, I would say "someone should hire me to finish it faster",
    but fortunately at this time I'm fully booked with other Chef gigs, so I
    can't really do it any faster :)
  • Andrea Campi at Dec 3, 2012 at 5:54 pm

    On Tue, Nov 6, 2012 at 6:52 PM, Andrea Campi wrote:
    On Tue, Nov 6, 2012 at 6:44 PM, Ben Langfeld wrote:

    Andrea, do you have any ETA on that release? Is there anything I can do
    to help expedite it?
    My plan is to spend a couple of hours every night focusing on one cookbook
    at a time, cleaning it up, scrubbing it free of any proprietary stuff, and
    finish writing tests.

    I will release them as soon as I have the mandatory components + Ruby +
    MongoDB ready—then I will go on with the others, releasing them one at a
    time as they are ready.
    So I would say 7-10 days to the first release.
    It took me a bit longer than expected, but the first batch of cookbooks is
    on the community site:

    * http://community.opscode.com/cookbooks/cloudfoundry
    * http://community.opscode.com/cookbooks/cloudfoundry-cloud_controller
    * http://community.opscode.com/cookbooks/cloudfoundry-health_manager
    * http://community.opscode.com/cookbooks/cloudfoundry-dea
    * http://community.opscode.com/cookbooks/cloudfoundry-router
    * http://community.opscode.com/cookbooks/cloudfoundry-stager
    * http://community.opscode.com/cookbooks/cloudfoundry-ruby-runtime

    To make it easy to play around with it, I also created a Vagrant-based
    project to bring it all together:
    https://github.com/andreacampi/cloudfoundry-vagrant

    With this I can stand up a single-VM CF and as soon as it's up I can
    register an admin, sign in, push a Sinatra app and access it.

    Next up:
    * MongoDB services
    * nginx in front of the cloud controller
    * Vagrant config for a multi-node installation
    * RabbitMQ and filesystem services
    * and then we'll see :)


    Please send feedback!

    Andrea
  • Ben Langfeld at Dec 3, 2012 at 6:33 pm
    Awesome, I'm sure we'll get a chance to try these out soon, and will
    certainly provide feedback as necessary.

    Regards,
    Ben Langfeld

    On 3 December 2012 15:46, Andrea Campi wrote:




    On Tue, Nov 6, 2012 at 6:52 PM, Andrea Campi <andrea.campi@zephirworks.com
    wrote:
    On Tue, Nov 6, 2012 at 6:44 PM, Ben Langfeld wrote:

    Andrea, do you have any ETA on that release? Is there anything I can do
    to help expedite it?
    My plan is to spend a couple of hours every night focusing on one
    cookbook at a time, cleaning it up, scrubbing it free of any proprietary
    stuff, and finish writing tests.

    I will release them as soon as I have the mandatory components + Ruby +
    MongoDB ready—then I will go on with the others, releasing them one at a
    time as they are ready.
    So I would say 7-10 days to the first release.
    It took me a bit longer than expected, but the first batch of cookbooks is
    on the community site:

    * http://community.opscode.com/cookbooks/cloudfoundry
    * http://community.opscode.com/cookbooks/cloudfoundry-cloud_controller
    * http://community.opscode.com/cookbooks/cloudfoundry-health_manager
    * http://community.opscode.com/cookbooks/cloudfoundry-dea
    * http://community.opscode.com/cookbooks/cloudfoundry-router
    * http://community.opscode.com/cookbooks/cloudfoundry-stager
    * http://community.opscode.com/cookbooks/cloudfoundry-ruby-runtime

    To make it easy to play around with it, I also created a Vagrant-based
    project to bring it all together:
    https://github.com/andreacampi/cloudfoundry-vagrant

    With this I can stand up a single-VM CF and as soon as it's up I can
    register an admin, sign in, push a Sinatra app and access it.

    Next up:
    * MongoDB services
    * nginx in front of the cloud controller
    * Vagrant config for a multi-node installation
    * RabbitMQ and filesystem services
    * and then we'll see :)


    Please send feedback!

    Andrea
  • KarlLeeB at Apr 3, 2013 at 4:27 pm
    I've attempted to run the Vagrant-based project but get the following error
    after running "vagrant up" in the "single-node" directory.
    [2013-04-03T15:49:50+00:00] ERROR: Running exception handlers
    [2013-04-03T15:49:50+00:00] ERROR: Exception handlers complete
    [2013-04-03T15:49:50+00:00] FATAL: Stacktrace dumped to
    /tmp/vagrant-chef-1/chef-stacktrace.out
    [2013-04-03T15:49:50+00:00] FATAL: Chef::Exceptions::FileNotFound:
    template[/var/vcap/data/cloud_controller/staging_manifests/standalone.yml]
    (cloudfoundry-cloud_controller::server line 81) had an error:
    Chef::Exceptions::FileNotFound: Cookbook 'cloudfoundry-cloud_controller'
    (1.3.7) does not contain a file at any of these locations:
    templates/ubuntu-12.04/standalone.yml.erb
    templates/ubuntu/standalone.yml.erb
    templates/default/standalone.yml.erb

    Fails out after this error. I've followed the instructions found here:
    https://github.com/andreacampi/cloudfoundry-vagrant

    Thanks,
    Karl
    On Monday, December 3, 2012 10:46:18 AM UTC-7, Andrea Campi wrote:




    On Tue, Nov 6, 2012 at 6:52 PM, Andrea Campi <andrea...@zephirworks.com<javascript:>
    wrote:
    On Tue, Nov 6, 2012 at 6:44 PM, Ben Langfeld <b...@langfeld.co.uk<javascript:>
    wrote:
    Andrea, do you have any ETA on that release? Is there anything I can do
    to help expedite it?
    My plan is to spend a couple of hours every night focusing on one
    cookbook at a time, cleaning it up, scrubbing it free of any proprietary
    stuff, and finish writing tests.

    I will release them as soon as I have the mandatory components + Ruby +
    MongoDB ready—then I will go on with the others, releasing them one at a
    time as they are ready.
    So I would say 7-10 days to the first release.
    It took me a bit longer than expected, but the first batch of cookbooks is
    on the community site:

    * http://community.opscode.com/cookbooks/cloudfoundry
    * http://community.opscode.com/cookbooks/cloudfoundry-cloud_controller
    * http://community.opscode.com/cookbooks/cloudfoundry-health_manager
    * http://community.opscode.com/cookbooks/cloudfoundry-dea
    * http://community.opscode.com/cookbooks/cloudfoundry-router
    * http://community.opscode.com/cookbooks/cloudfoundry-stager
    * http://community.opscode.com/cookbooks/cloudfoundry-ruby-runtime

    To make it easy to play around with it, I also created a Vagrant-based
    project to bring it all together:
    https://github.com/andreacampi/cloudfoundry-vagrant

    With this I can stand up a single-VM CF and as soon as it's up I can
    register an admin, sign in, push a Sinatra app and access it.

    Next up:
    * MongoDB services
    * nginx in front of the cloud controller
    * Vagrant config for a multi-node installation
    * RabbitMQ and filesystem services
    * and then we'll see :)


    Please send feedback!

    Andrea

Related Discussions

Discussion Navigation
viewthread | post
Discussion Overview
groupvcap-dev @
postedNov 2, '12 at 7:24p
activeApr 3, '13 at 4:27p
posts22
users9

People

Translate

site design / logo © 2021 Grokbase