FAQ
Hello everyone,


If anyone is interested, I have created a HOWTO
on running a Motorola GPS receiver connected to
a CentOS 7 box via serial port (com1),
with 1PPS over DCD.


The trick here is that CentOS 7 uses systemd
and setup was a bit different. Anyway,
everything works.


The result is a highly accurate NTP server, Stratum 1.


Here is the documentation.


http://www.maximaphysics.com/Centos_7_GPS_Setup.html


Let me know if something does not look right.


-George, N2FGX

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  • Alexander Dalloz at Dec 12, 2014 at 9:29 am

    Am 11.12.2014 um 21:57 schrieb xaos:
    Hello everyone,

    If anyone is interested, I have created a HOWTO
    on running a Motorola GPS receiver connected to
    a CentOS 7 box via serial port (com1),
    with 1PPS over DCD.

    The trick here is that CentOS 7 uses systemd
    and setup was a bit different. Anyway,
    everything works.

    The result is a highly accurate NTP server, Stratum 1.

    Here is the documentation.

    http://www.maximaphysics.com/Centos_7_GPS_Setup.html

    Let me know if something does not look right.

    -George, N2FGX

    Hello George,


    thanks for the interesting article.


    Mind you one question: why did you replace the NTPd shipping with CentOS
    7 by a source compilation? Is the NTPd version provided by CentOS
    lacking some important feature for that usecase?


    Regards


    Alexander
  • Xaos at Dec 12, 2014 at 2:55 pm
    Alexander,


    First off, CentOS7 came with cronyd. Which was very annoying
    because when I tried to remove it, it had 2 prereqs:
    anaconda
    initial-setup


    Now, I don't know why the setup program kept these
    2 around. I think CentOS7 needs a bit growing up.


    Anyway, I disabled chrony:
    systemctl disable time-sync
    systemctl stop time-sync


    Then I installed ntp. However, when I started it
    it seems that it was not compiled with: --enable-all-clocks


    So, I downloaded the latest and re-compiled with:


    ./configure --with-crypto --enable-all-clocks --enable-step-slew


    I built it as per the document and everything looks good


    -G

    On 12/12/2014 04:29 AM, Alexander Dalloz wrote:
    Am 11.12.2014 um 21:57 schrieb xaos:
    Hello everyone,

    If anyone is interested, I have created a HOWTO
    on running a Motorola GPS receiver connected to
    a CentOS 7 box via serial port (com1),
    with 1PPS over DCD.

    The trick here is that CentOS 7 uses systemd
    and setup was a bit different. Anyway,
    everything works.

    The result is a highly accurate NTP server, Stratum 1.

    Here is the documentation.

    http://www.maximaphysics.com/Centos_7_GPS_Setup.html

    Let me know if something does not look right.

    -George, N2FGX
    Hello George,

    thanks for the interesting article.

    Mind you one question: why did you replace the NTPd shipping with
    CentOS 7 by a source compilation? Is the NTPd version provided by
    CentOS lacking some important feature for that usecase?

    Regards

    Alexander


    _______________________________________________
    CentOS mailing list
    CentOS at centos.org
    http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
  • Nux! at Dec 12, 2014 at 3:12 pm
    The right thing to do next is to ask for this change upstream, so people can get regular updates and stay secure.


    Lucian


    --
    Sent from the Delta quadrant using Borg technology!


    Nux!
    www.nux.ro

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "xaos" <xaos@darksmile.net>
    To: centos at centos.org
    Sent: Friday, 12 December, 2014 14:55:12
    Subject: Re: [CentOS] HOWTO Stratum 1 NTP server under CentOS 7
    Alexander,

    First off, CentOS7 came with cronyd. Which was very annoying
    because when I tried to remove it, it had 2 prereqs:
    anaconda
    initial-setup

    Now, I don't know why the setup program kept these
    2 around. I think CentOS7 needs a bit growing up.

    Anyway, I disabled chrony:
    systemctl disable time-sync
    systemctl stop time-sync

    Then I installed ntp. However, when I started it
    it seems that it was not compiled with: --enable-all-clocks

    So, I downloaded the latest and re-compiled with:

    ./configure --with-crypto --enable-all-clocks --enable-step-slew

    I built it as per the document and everything looks good

    -G
    On 12/12/2014 04:29 AM, Alexander Dalloz wrote:
    Am 11.12.2014 um 21:57 schrieb xaos:
    Hello everyone,

    If anyone is interested, I have created a HOWTO
    on running a Motorola GPS receiver connected to
    a CentOS 7 box via serial port (com1),
    with 1PPS over DCD.

    The trick here is that CentOS 7 uses systemd
    and setup was a bit different. Anyway,
    everything works.

    The result is a highly accurate NTP server, Stratum 1.

    Here is the documentation.

    http://www.maximaphysics.com/Centos_7_GPS_Setup.html

    Let me know if something does not look right.

    -George, N2FGX
    Hello George,

    thanks for the interesting article.

    Mind you one question: why did you replace the NTPd shipping with
    CentOS 7 by a source compilation? Is the NTPd version provided by
    CentOS lacking some important feature for that usecase?

    Regards

    Alexander


    _______________________________________________
    CentOS mailing list
    CentOS at centos.org
    http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
    _______________________________________________
    CentOS mailing list
    CentOS at centos.org
    http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
  • Tom Bishop at Dec 12, 2014 at 3:17 pm

    On Fri, Dec 12, 2014 at 9:12 AM, Nux! wrote:
    The right thing to do next is to ask for this change upstream, so people can get regular updates and stay secure.

    Lucian

    --
    Sent from the Delta quadrant using Borg technology!

    Nux!
    www.nux.ro

    +1 agree 100%
  • Jonathan Billings at Dec 12, 2014 at 4:55 pm

    On Fri, Dec 12, 2014 at 09:55:12AM -0500, xaos wrote:
    Alexander,

    First off, CentOS7 came with cronyd. Which was very annoying
    because when I tried to remove it, it had 2 prereqs:
    anaconda
    initial-setup

    Now, I don't know why the setup program kept these
    2 around. I think CentOS7 needs a bit growing up.

    'initial-setup' is the program that runs on your first boot, and it
    requires 'anaconda'. 'anaconda' requires the 'chrony' package.
    Services in the default install require a time-sync daemon, and chrony
    is the default, so this isn't really unexpected. Once a system is set
    up, it doesn't remove the initial-setup package.

    Then I installed ntp. However, when I started it
    it seems that it was not compiled with: --enable-all-clocks

    That doesn't seem to be the case. Looking at the NTP spec file, I
    see:


    %configure \
             --sysconfdir=%{_sysconfdir}/ntp/crypto \
             --with-openssl-libdir=%{_libdir} \
             --without-ntpsnmpd \
             --enable-all-clocks --enable-parse-clocks \
             --enable-ntp-signd=%{_localstatedir}/run/ntp_signd \
             --disable-local-libopts


    (check the git.centos.org version yourself:
    https://git.centos.org/blob/rpms!ntp.git/dbacec4466ee70248db634b110bfad8a2b74cd82/SPECS!ntp.spec
    )


    As far as I can tell, there is literally no reason why you can't use
    the packaged ntpd.


    If you are having a problem with getting the packaged ntpd working, I
    suggest filing a bug against the RHEL package. The package has many
    patches, perhaps one of them is interfering with detecting your
    device.




    --
    Jonathan Billings <billings@negate.org>
  • Xaos at Dec 12, 2014 at 5:11 pm
    Jonathan,


    I would much prefer to run out-of-the box. No question!


    BTW, on other machines that I installed CentOS7,
    chrony, was not there. Neither was anaconda or initial-setup.
    This was after the install, naturally.


    Ok, so maybe this box was unlucky. It was installed the same day
    as Centos7 came out. I will re-install, update and see what happens.


    Quite often the problem lies between the computer and the chair.


    Update to follow...


    -George

    On 12/12/2014 11:55 AM, Jonathan Billings wrote:
    On Fri, Dec 12, 2014 at 09:55:12AM -0500, xaos wrote:
    Alexander,

    First off, CentOS7 came with cronyd. Which was very annoying
    because when I tried to remove it, it had 2 prereqs:
    anaconda
    initial-setup

    Now, I don't know why the setup program kept these
    2 around. I think CentOS7 needs a bit growing up.
    'initial-setup' is the program that runs on your first boot, and it
    requires 'anaconda'. 'anaconda' requires the 'chrony' package.
    Services in the default install require a time-sync daemon, and chrony
    is the default, so this isn't really unexpected. Once a system is set
    up, it doesn't remove the initial-setup package.
    Then I installed ntp. However, when I started it
    it seems that it was not compiled with: --enable-all-clocks
    That doesn't seem to be the case. Looking at the NTP spec file, I
    see:

    %configure \
    --sysconfdir=%{_sysconfdir}/ntp/crypto \
    --with-openssl-libdir=%{_libdir} \
    --without-ntpsnmpd \
    --enable-all-clocks --enable-parse-clocks \
    --enable-ntp-signd=%{_localstatedir}/run/ntp_signd \
    --disable-local-libopts

    (check the git.centos.org version yourself:
    https://git.centos.org/blob/rpms!ntp.git/dbacec4466ee70248db634b110bfad8a2b74cd82/SPECS!ntp.spec
    )

    As far as I can tell, there is literally no reason why you can't use
    the packaged ntpd.

    If you are having a problem with getting the packaged ntpd working, I
    suggest filing a bug against the RHEL package. The package has many
    patches, perhaps one of them is interfering with detecting your
    device.
  • Sven Kieske at Dec 12, 2014 at 8:50 pm

    On 12.12.2014 17:55, Jonathan Billings wrote:
    'initial-setup' is the program that runs on your first boot, and
    it requires 'anaconda'. 'anaconda' requires the 'chrony' package.
    Services in the default install require a time-sync daemon, and
    chrony is the default, so this isn't really unexpected. Once a
    system is set up, it doesn't remove the initial-setup package.
    Then it should just require a time-sync daemon, and not a specific one
    imho.


    regards


    Sven
  • Jonathan Billings at Dec 12, 2014 at 8:56 pm

    On Fri, Dec 12, 2014 at 09:50:16PM +0100, Sven Kieske wrote:
    Then it should just require a time-sync daemon, and not a specific one
    imho.

    Perhaps both the 'chrony' and 'ntp' packages should Provide
    'server(smtp)' (similar to how sendmail/postfix work with SMTP)? That
    way anaconda could just require 'server(ntp)'.


    Either way, this isn't something that would need to be solved in the
    upstream distribution.


    --
    Jonathan Billings <billings@negate.org>
  • Jonathan Billings at Dec 12, 2014 at 8:58 pm

    On Fri, Dec 12, 2014 at 03:56:46PM -0500, Jonathan Billings wrote:
    Perhaps both the 'chrony' and 'ntp' packages should Provide
    'server(smtp)'

    Errr... I meant:


    Provide: server(ntp)




    --
    Jonathan Billings <billings@negate.org>

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