FAQ
From RHEL docs:
"The default implementation of LUKS in Red Hat Enterprise Linux is AES
128 with a SHA256 hashing. Ciphers that are available are:

AES - Advanced Encryption Standard - FIPS PUB 197
Twofish (A 128-bit Block Cipher)
Serpent
cast5 - RFC 2144
cast6 - RFC 2612"

My question is:
What will be the performance impact on my Celeron 1.73 GHz CPU and/or
hdd speed?


--

Ljubomir Ljubojevic
(Love is in the Air)
PL Computers
Serbia, Europe

Google is the Mother, Google is the Father, and traceroute is your
trusty Spiderman...
StarOS, Mikrotik and CentOS/RHEL/Linux consultant

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  • Devin Reade at Jan 7, 2012 at 6:56 pm

    Ljubomir Ljubojevic wrote:

    What will be the performance impact on my Celeron 1.73 GHz CPU and/or
    hdd speed?
    Well, the usual "it depends on your [exact] environment" is the real answer.

    However from a subjective perspective I've found that the only time
    that I've really noticed a performance impact is during lots of I/O,
    such as a *large* tarball extraction. (Presumably writing a large file
    would be similar.) Eclipse, for example, touches a huge amount of files
    but encryption on the underyling filesystem is not generally noticable.
    It can be more noticable on a single core, single thread CPU.

    If you have a server doing significant continuous I/O, probably
    benchmarking is the only reasonable way to tell.

    Devin
    --
    There's too much blood in my caffeine system.
  • Ljubomir Ljubojevic at Jan 7, 2012 at 7:05 pm

    On 01/08/2012 12:56 AM, Devin Reade wrote:
    Ljubomir Ljubojevicwrote:
    What will be the performance impact on my Celeron 1.73 GHz CPU and/or
    hdd speed?
    Well, the usual "it depends on your [exact] environment" is the real answer.

    However from a subjective perspective I've found that the only time
    that I've really noticed a performance impact is during lots of I/O,
    such as a *large* tarball extraction. (Presumably writing a large file
    would be similar.) Eclipse, for example, touches a huge amount of files
    but encryption on the underyling filesystem is not generally noticable.
    It can be more noticable on a single core, single thread CPU.

    If you have a server doing significant continuous I/O, probably
    benchmarking is the only reasonable way to tell.
    Hm, I forgot to mention that it would be for laptop. MSI VR601x, Celeron
    1.73 GHz (Single Core), 80 GB SATA, 2GB RAM, CentOS 6.2 x86_64,
    encryption would be activated by Anaconda on ext4 partitions belonging
    to LVM Volume Group.

    --

    Ljubomir Ljubojevic
    (Love is in the Air)
    PL Computers
    Serbia, Europe

    Google is the Mother, Google is the Father, and traceroute is your
    trusty Spiderman...
    StarOS, Mikrotik and CentOS/RHEL/Linux consultant
  • Devin Reade at Jan 7, 2012 at 10:02 pm

    Ljubomir Ljubojevic wrote:

    Hm, I forgot to mention that it would be for laptop. MSI VR601x, Celeron
    1.73 GHz (Single Core), 80 GB SATA, 2GB RAM, CentOS 6.2 x86_64,
    encryption would be activated by Anaconda on ext4 partitions belonging
    to LVM Volume Group.
    I had guessed that you were talking about a laptop; the server comment
    was only for completeness.

    Although I have since replaced it with a Thinkpad T500, I used to run a
    Thinkpad T42 (which is a 32 bit system at around the same clock speed,
    with the same amount of memory) using full disk encryption under CentOS 5.6.
    As a general workstation it was just fine. Using it as a development
    system running eclipse, tomcat, db2, plus the usual desktop programs
    was, toward the end, causing it to start to chug, but I don't think that
    that was primarily due to encryption; I think available memory and processor
    speed for non-encryption tasks were the limiting factors. It also used
    a PATA disk, not SATA.

    Devin
    --
    There's too much blood in my caffeine system.
  • Nux at Jan 8, 2012 at 5:14 am

    Ljubomir Ljubojevic writes:

    From RHEL docs:
    "The default implementation of LUKS in Red Hat Enterprise Linux is AES
    128 with a SHA256 hashing. Ciphers that are available are:

    AES - Advanced Encryption Standard - FIPS PUB 197
    Twofish (A 128-bit Block Cipher)
    Serpent
    cast5 - RFC 2144
    cast6 - RFC 2612"

    My question is:
    What will be the performance impact on my Celeron 1.73 GHz CPU and/or
    hdd speed?
    I can't give any numbers, but I've been using luks for years now and while
    it sure adds a performance hit I don't find it really noticeable
    (especially on latest cpus) during normal use (web browsing, emails,
    films, office etc). Think of it this way, that laptop is already slow, at
    least now it will be secure. :-)
  • Jorge Fábregas at Jan 8, 2012 at 8:13 am

    On 01/07/2012 06:40 PM, Ljubomir Ljubojevic wrote:
    What will be the performance impact on my Celeron 1.73 GHz CPU and/or
    hdd speed?
    To further add to what has been said, check if your particular CPU
    supports the AES-NI instruction set which should provide some
    performance boost:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AES_instruction_set

    Of course, that is, if you choose to use the AES cipher (the default).

    HTH,
    Jorge
  • Ljubomir Ljubojevic at Jan 8, 2012 at 8:29 am

    On 01/08/2012 02:13 PM, Jorge F?bregas wrote:
    On 01/07/2012 06:40 PM, Ljubomir Ljubojevic wrote:
    What will be the performance impact on my Celeron 1.73 GHz CPU and/or
    hdd speed?
    To further add to what has been said, check if your particular CPU
    supports the AES-NI instruction set which should provide some
    performance boost:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AES_instruction_set

    Of course, that is, if you choose to use the AES cipher (the default).
    My laptop is 3-4 years old, no AES addon in it. And I can see only high
    end CPU's have them, so I will not be buying one sore several years (I
    also use laptop in the field, grain silos, etc so I will not buy
    anything that is expensive).

    But thanks for the info, to all of you of course.

    --

    Ljubomir Ljubojevic
    (Love is in the Air)
    PL Computers
    Serbia, Europe

    Google is the Mother, Google is the Father, and traceroute is your
    trusty Spiderman...
    StarOS, Mikrotik and CentOS/RHEL/Linux consultant
  • Nux at Jan 8, 2012 at 4:43 pm

    Ljubomir Ljubojevic writes:

    My laptop is 3-4 years old, no AES addon in it. And I can see only high
    end CPU's have them, so I will not be buying one sore several years (I
    also use laptop in the field, grain silos, etc so I will not buy
    anything that is expensive).
    Then all the more reason to use encryption if the machine is going to be so
    much moved around (and at higher risk of being stolen etc).

    Cheerio

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