FAQ
Hi

I am trying to install CentOS 5.6 on HP DL 180 G6 which has HP Smart
Array B110i SATA RAID Controller Driver. I have 4 * 500 GB SATA HDD
and configured RAID 1+0 using System BIOS, the BIOS detects usable
disk space as 940GB disk space, when i start installing the OS, it
does not detect HP Smart Array B110i SATA RAID Controller Driver

As per http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bizsupport/TechSupport/SoftwareDescription.jsp?lang=en&cc=us&prodTypeId351&prodSeriesId884339&swItem=MTX-ee8b3f5c09a44b8aa259d07d3d&prodNameId884340&swEnvOID@04&swLang=8&taskId5&mode=4&idx=1

Is there a way to get .iso file during installation of CentOS Linux ?

Please suggest/guide

Regards

Kaushal

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  • Mark Roth at Jul 5, 2011 at 10:18 am

    Kaushal Shriyan wrote:
    Hi

    I am trying to install CentOS 5.6 on HP DL 180 G6 which has HP Smart
    Array B110i SATA RAID Controller Driver. I have 4 * 500 GB SATA HDD
    and configured RAID 1+0 using System BIOS, the BIOS detects usable
    disk space as 940GB disk space, when i start installing the OS, it
    does not detect HP Smart Array B110i SATA RAID Controller Driver
    <snip>
    Not familiar with the HP RAID controller card, but with others, you have
    to go into the firmware on boot, and make the arrays, then make the
    controller present it to the o/s. Until you do that very last step, you
    don't see anything.

    mark
  • Joseph L. Casale at Jul 5, 2011 at 10:46 am

    I am trying to install CentOS 5.6 on HP DL 180 G6 which has HP Smart
    Array B110i SATA RAID Controller Driver. I have 4 * 500 GB SATA HDD
    and configured RAID 1+0 using System BIOS, the BIOS detects usable
    disk space as 940GB disk space, when i start installing the OS, it
    does not detect HP Smart Array B110i SATA RAID Controller Driver
    That thing is a software raid setup iirc, although there is an rpm for it
    post install, you could use the ddkit from rhel to make a dd image but
    frankly I would just use mdraid, turn off the riad setup and just use AHCI.
  • Mark Roth at Jul 5, 2011 at 11:08 am

    Joseph L. Casale wrote:
    I am trying to install CentOS 5.6 on HP DL 180 G6 which has HP Smart
    Array B110i SATA RAID Controller Driver. I have 4 * 500 GB SATA HDD
    and configured RAID 1+0 using System BIOS, the BIOS detects usable
    disk space as 940GB disk space, when i start installing the OS, it
    does not detect HP Smart Array B110i SATA RAID Controller Driver
    That thing is a software raid setup iirc, although there is an rpm for it
    post install, you could use the ddkit from rhel to make a dd image but
    frankly I would just use mdraid, turn off the riad setup and just use
    AHCI.
    Hmmm... if that's a software RAID, the o/s wouldn't see it, I would think,
    until it was up. In that case, I'd make a plain vanilla partition
    somewhere for /boot.

    mark
  • John Doe at Jul 5, 2011 at 11:44 am
    From: Kaushal Shriyan <kaushalshriyan at gmail.com>
    I am trying to install CentOS 5.6 on HP DL 180 G6 which has HP Smart
    Array B110i SATA RAID Controller Driver. I have 4 * 500 GB SATA HDD
    and configured RAID 1+0 using System BIOS, the BIOS detects usable
    disk space as 940GB disk space, when i start installing the OS, it
    does not detect HP Smart Array B110i SATA RAID Controller Driver
    As per
    http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bizsupport/TechSupport/SoftwareDescription.jsp?lang=en&cc=us&prodTypeId351&prodSeriesId884339&swItem=MTX-ee8b3f5c09a44b8aa259d07d3d&prodNameId884340&swEnvOID@04&swLang=8&taskId5&mode=4&idx=1
    Is there a way to get .iso file during installation of CentOS Linux ?
    As mark said, did you create one (or more) logical drive(s) after you created the array?
    About the driver, they say: "The successful installation will replace the driver that shipped with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5" which seems to imply that a working driver exists already...
    Also, remember for later that many hp tools/drivers do check the /etc/redhat-release for a specific Redhat release string...
    If they see "CentOS ..." instead of "Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server release 5 (Tikanga)", it won't install.

    JD
  • Kaushal Shriyan at Jul 5, 2011 at 6:37 pm

    On Tue, Jul 5, 2011 at 9:14 PM, John Doe wrote:
    From: Kaushal Shriyan <kaushalshriyan at gmail.com>
    I am trying to install CentOS 5.6 on HP DL 180 G6 which has HP Smart
    Array B110i SATA RAID Controller Driver. I have 4 * 500 GB SATA HDD
    and configured RAID 1+0 using System BIOS, the BIOS detects usable
    disk space as 940GB disk space, when i start installing the OS, it
    does not detect HP Smart Array B110i SATA RAID Controller Driver
    As per
    http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bizsupport/TechSupport/SoftwareDescription.jsp?lang=en&cc=us&prodTypeId351&prodSeriesId884339&swItem=MTX-ee8b3f5c09a44b8aa259d07d3d&prodNameId884340&swEnvOID@04&swLang=8&taskId5&mode=4&idx=1
    Is there a way to get .iso file during installation of CentOS Linux ?
    As mark said, did you create one (or more) logical drive(s) after you created the array?
    About the driver, they say: "The successful installation will replace the driver that shipped with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5" which seems to imply that a working driver exists already...
    Also, remember for later that many hp tools/drivers do check the /etc/redhat-release for a specific Redhat release string...
    If they see "CentOS ..." instead of "Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server release 5 (Tikanga)", it won't install.

    JD
    Hi again

    So what i understand is disable RAID mode on the BIOS and enable AHCI
    mode and install the OS and install driver rpm and use the HP
    proprietary solution and it would be a software raid or use mdadm
    software RAID as provided by the OS ?

    Please help me understand.

    Regards,

    Kaushal
  • Joseph L. Casale at Jul 5, 2011 at 6:57 pm
    Please help me understand.
    If the device requires an additional driver, unless its packaged as a dd for use at
    install, how can you install and then add a driver?

    Disable RAID mode, set it to AHCI, then Anaconda will see all the individual discs
    at which point during install you can choose to setup Linux md raid, far simpler
    and almost always better than software raid IMHO.

    Recovery and monitoring facilities are built into Linux, life's just easier...
  • Kaushal Shriyan at Jul 5, 2011 at 7:28 pm

    On Wed, Jul 6, 2011 at 4:27 AM, Joseph L. Casale wrote:
    Please help me understand.
    If the device requires an additional driver, unless its packaged as a dd for use at
    install, how can you install and then add a driver?

    Disable RAID mode, set it to AHCI, then Anaconda will see all the individual discs
    at which point during install you can choose to setup Linux md raid, far simpler
    and almost always better than software raid IMHO.

    Recovery and monitoring facilities are built into Linux, life's just easier...
    _______________________________________________
    CentOS mailing list
    CentOS at centos.org
    http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
    Hi Joseph L Casale
    That thing is a software raid setup iirc, although there is an rpm for it
    post install, you could use the ddkit from rhel to make a dd image but
    frankly I would just use mdraid, turn off the riad setup and just use AHCI.
    Thanks for the quick reply and explanation. You said use dd kit from
    rhel and create a linux device driver image and supply drivers during
    OS installation. dd command i suppose. Please further suggest.

    I have extracted the rpm file and it has hpahcisr.o file. Am i
    understanding you correctly ?

    Thanks again

    Regards

    Kaushal
  • Simon Matter at Jul 6, 2011 at 3:03 am

    On Wed, Jul 6, 2011 at 4:27 AM, Joseph L. Casale
    wrote:
    Please help me understand.
    If the device requires an additional driver, unless its packaged as a dd
    for use at
    install, how can you install and then add a driver?

    Disable RAID mode, set it to AHCI, then Anaconda will see all the
    individual discs
    at which point during install you can choose to setup Linux md raid, far
    simpler
    and almost always better than software raid IMHO.

    Recovery and monitoring facilities are built into Linux, life's just
    easier...
    _______________________________________________
    CentOS mailing list
    CentOS at centos.org
    http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
    Hi Joseph L Casale
    That thing is a software raid setup iirc, although there is an rpm for it
    post install, you could use the ddkit from rhel to make a dd image but
    frankly I would just use mdraid, turn off the riad setup and just use
    AHCI.
    Thanks for the quick reply and explanation. You said use dd kit from
    rhel and create a linux device driver image and supply drivers during
    OS installation. dd command i suppose. Please further suggest.

    I have extracted the rpm file and it has hpahcisr.o file. Am i
    understanding you correctly ?
    Hi Kaushal,

    Maybe there's some kind of misunderstanding. The term software raid can be
    misleading because IMHO mdraid is also an software raid. So let's use the
    term fakeraid for those controllers which make one believe they do
    everything in their hardware but in fact simply do some kind of software
    raid in thier proprietary OS driver.

    So, what you should try to find out is whether your controller is not
    usable in raid mode because the OS has no support for it (seems obvious)
    or if you set the controller into AHCI mode in BIOS, if the controller is
    usable by the OS without any additional driver.

    So, go to the BIOS and set the disk controller to AHCI mode (if such
    setting exists) and try to install the OS. If you'll see any disks in this
    configuration, the just go with mdraid and you're done.

    Simon
  • Kaushal Shriyan at Jul 6, 2011 at 2:10 pm

    On Wed, Jul 6, 2011 at 12:33 PM, Simon Matter wrote:
    On Wed, Jul 6, 2011 at 4:27 AM, Joseph L. Casale
    wrote:
    Please help me understand.
    If the device requires an additional driver, unless its packaged as a dd
    for use at
    install, how can you install and then add a driver?

    Disable RAID mode, set it to AHCI, then Anaconda will see all the
    individual discs
    at which point during install you can choose to setup Linux md raid, far
    simpler
    and almost always better than software raid IMHO.

    Recovery and monitoring facilities are built into Linux, life's just
    easier...
    _______________________________________________
    CentOS mailing list
    CentOS at centos.org
    http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
    Hi Joseph L Casale
    That thing is a software raid setup iirc, although there is an rpm for it
    post install, you could use the ddkit from rhel to make a dd image but
    frankly I would just use mdraid, turn off the riad setup and just use
    AHCI.
    Thanks for the quick reply and explanation. You said use dd kit from
    rhel and create a linux device driver image and supply drivers during
    OS installation. ?dd command i suppose. Please further suggest.

    I have extracted the rpm file and it has hpahcisr.o file. Am i
    understanding you correctly ?
    Hi Kaushal,

    Maybe there's some kind of misunderstanding. The term software raid can be
    misleading because IMHO mdraid is also an software raid. So let's use the
    term fakeraid for those controllers which make one believe they do
    everything in their hardware but in fact simply do some kind of software
    raid in thier proprietary OS driver.

    So, what you should try to find out is whether your controller is not
    usable in raid mode because the OS has no support for it (seems obvious)
    or if you set the controller into AHCI mode in BIOS, if the controller is
    usable by the OS without any additional driver.

    So, go to the BIOS and set the disk controller to AHCI mode (if such
    setting exists) and try to install the OS. If you'll see any disks in this
    configuration, the just go with mdraid and you're done.

    Simon
    Hi Simon,

    Thanks for the explanation. Please help me understand why do Hardware
    Vendors provide onboard storage raid controller chipset on the
    motherboard (fakeraid if its a software raid.). Is it a marketing
    term for selling servers. Since it does not add value at all strictly
    speaking due to the fact that the OS is unable to determine the
    Logical drives.

    Awaiting your earnest reply.

    Regards

    Kaushal
  • John R Pierce at Jul 6, 2011 at 2:18 pm

    On 07/06/11 11:10 AM, Kaushal Shriyan wrote:
    Please help me understand why do Hardware
    Vendors provide onboard storage raid controller chipset on the
    motherboard (fakeraid if its a software raid.). Is it a marketing
    term for selling servers.

    They do it because it is nearly free, and yes, its a marketing thing.
    Also, MS Windows Server's 'native' raid, aka Dynamic Disks, is rather
    funky and few people like to mess with it, so having 'fake' raid in the
    chipset and its drivers makes life simpler for Windows administrators.

    Higher end servers will have true raid cards with their own processor,
    and substantial battery backed write-back cache. these cards tend to
    cost more than the whole MicroServer



    --
    john r pierce N 37, W 122
    santa cruz ca mid-left coast
  • Rudi Ahlers at Jul 6, 2011 at 2:19 pm

    On Wed, Jul 6, 2011 at 8:10 PM, Kaushal Shriyan wrote:
    Hi Simon,

    Thanks for the explanation. Please help me understand why do Hardware
    Vendors provide onboard storage raid controller chipset on the
    motherboard (fakeraid if its a software raid.). ?Is it a marketing
    term for selling servers. Since it does not add value at all strictly
    speaking due to the fact that the OS is unable to determine the
    Logical drives.

    Awaiting your earnest reply.

    Regards

    Kaushal
    _______________________________________________

    Frankly, that's something you'd need to ask the vendors directly.
    Everyone else can just give you speculation, or their idea of what
    they think the real reason behind this is.

    That said, many onboard RAID chipsets work fine with various Linux
    distributions, and all of them work fine with Windows. In the case of
    Windows you also need to install the drivers while installing Windows.
    And this is cause the OS developers, whether Linux, UNIX or Windows
    don't always have the drivers readily available to include in the
    installation files but instead rely on the hardware developers to
    supply the drivers on disk, or on the internet.


    --
    Kind Regards
    Rudi Ahlers
    SoftDux

    Website: http://www.SoftDux.com
    Technical Blog: http://Blog.SoftDux.com
    Office: 087 805 9573
    Cell: 082 554 7532
  • John Doe at Jul 7, 2011 at 5:04 am
    From: Kaushal Shriyan <kaushalshriyan at gmail.com>
    Thanks for the explanation. Please help me understand why do Hardware
    Vendors provide onboard storage raid controller chipset on the
    motherboard (fakeraid if its a software raid.).? Is it a marketing
    term for selling servers. Since it does not add value at all strictly
    speaking due to the fact that the OS is unable to determine the
    Logical drives.
    Awaiting your earnest reply.
    My earnest reply would be that, like winmodems, winprinters and other hybrids, fakeraid is cheaper to manufacture since part of the device logic is done by the driver (at the expense of the server)...
    So yes, it would be marketing to say we do RAID, while saving on the manufacturing cost of a real raid controller...
    But dunno who to blame between the server or the motherboard manufacturers... or both.
    Another marketing ploy I hated was the old drives claiming a xxGB* capacity............? (*based on a 1:2 compression ratio).

    JD
  • Ljubomir Ljubojevic at Jul 7, 2011 at 11:44 am

    John Doe wrote:
    From: Kaushal Shriyan <kaushalshriyan at gmail.com>
    Thanks for the explanation. Please help me understand why do Hardware
    Vendors provide onboard storage raid controller chipset on the
    motherboard (fakeraid if its a software raid.). Is it a marketing
    term for selling servers. Since it does not add value at all strictly
    speaking due to the fact that the OS is unable to determine the
    Logical drives.
    Awaiting your earnest reply.
    My earnest reply would be that, like winmodems, winprinters and other hybrids, fakeraid is cheaper to manufacture since part of the device logic is done by the driver (at the expense of the server)...
    So yes, it would be marketing to say we do RAID, while saving on the manufacturing cost of a real raid controller...
    But dunno who to blame between the server or the motherboard manufacturers... or both.
    Another marketing ploy I hated was the old drives claiming a xxGB* capacity............ (*based on a 1:2 compression ratio).
    Chipset makers are ones to blame for creating them in the first place,
    since they incorporated cheap RAID support in (almost) every HDD
    controller chipset. I guess the first one to do it is one to blame, the
    rest figured it is easier to implement it then explain it is not a
    healthy choice for data safe keeping.

    Ljubomir

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