FAQ
Has anybody successfully installed CentOS-

I tried (several times) installing CentOS-5.6 from a hard disk,
and each time it failed after installing all the rpms,
with the warning "The installation has tried to mount image #2,
but cannot find it on the hard drive."

When I pressed the Debug button one time after the failure,
it seemed to say that it was looking for the file in /dev/sdb7//ext2/
(/dev/sdb7 being the site of the DVD ISO).

But I'm not sure what "image #2" is? Or where it should be put?

Incidentally, I started by copying isolinux/vmlinuz and isolinux/initrd.img
to the the directory CentOS-5.6 in the /boot parition
of a working linux (Fedora) system, and adding the stanza
----------------------------
title CentOS-5.6
root (hd0,1)
kernel /CentOS-5.6/vmlinuz repo=hd:/dev/sdb5:/
initrd /CentOS-5.6/initrd.img
----------------------------
The repo option was ignored, and I was asked if I wanted to install by FTP,
from Hard Disk, etc.

In the end I installed by http from my web-server, after
mount -o loop CentOS-5.6-x86_64-bin-DVD-1of2.iso /var/www/html/
on the server .
This worked faultlessly, and seems to be by far the easiest way
to install CentOS or Fedora if a local web-server is available.



--
Timothy Murphy
e-mail: gayleard /at/ eircom.net
tel: +353-86-2336090, +353-1-2842366
s-mail: School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland

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  • Don Krause at Jun 6, 2011 at 6:44 pm

    On Jun 6, 2011, at 3:19 PM, Timothy Murphy wrote:

    Has anybody successfully installed CentOS-

    I tried (several times) installing CentOS-5.6 from a hard disk,
    and each time it failed after installing all the rpms,
    with the warning "The installation has tried to mount image #2,
    but cannot find it on the hard drive."

    When I pressed the Debug button one time after the failure,
    it seemed to say that it was looking for the file in /dev/sdb7//ext2/
    (/dev/sdb7 being the site of the DVD ISO).

    But I'm not sure what "image #2" is? Or where it should be put?

    Incidentally, I started by copying isolinux/vmlinuz and isolinux/initrd.img
    to the the directory CentOS-5.6 in the /boot parition
    of a working linux (Fedora) system, and adding the stanza
    ----------------------------
    title CentOS-5.6
    root (hd0,1)
    kernel /CentOS-5.6/vmlinuz repo=hd:/dev/sdb5:/
    initrd /CentOS-5.6/initrd.img
    ----------------------------
    The repo option was ignored, and I was asked if I wanted to install by FTP,
    from Hard Disk, etc.

    In the end I installed by http from my web-server, after
    mount -o loop CentOS-5.6-x86_64-bin-DVD-1of2.iso /var/www/html/
    on the server .
    This worked faultlessly, and seems to be by far the easiest way
    to install CentOS or Fedora if a local web-server is available.

    Strange, I install it from the DVD.iso to VMWare images a couple times a month, haven't seen that issue.

    Once a new release gets approved for production, I copy the contents of the DVD.iso to our PXE Boot server,
    and install production machines from there.

    (FWIW, I have not installed in onto real hardware, from a real DVD, in a couple years now..)

    Are you sure your DVD matches the checksums?
    --
    Don Krause
    Head Systems Geek,
    Waver of Deceased Chickens.
    Optivus Proton Therapy, Inc.
    P.O. Box 608
    Loma Linda, California 92354
    909.799.8327 Tel
    909.799.8366 Fax
    dkrause at optivus.com
    www.optivus.com
    "This message represents the official view of the voices in my head."






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  • Timothy Murphy at Jun 6, 2011 at 7:58 pm

    Don Krause wrote:

    I tried (several times) installing CentOS-5.6 from a hard disk,
    and each time it failed after installing all the rpms,
    with the warning "The installation has tried to mount image #2,
    but cannot find it on the hard drive."
    Strange, I install it from the DVD.iso to VMWare images a couple times a
    month, haven't seen that issue.

    Once a new release gets approved for production, I copy the contents of
    the DVD.iso to our PXE Boot server, and install production machines from
    there.

    (FWIW, I have not installed in onto real hardware, from a real DVD, in a
    couple years now..)

    Are you sure your DVD matches the checksums?
    Yes:
    md5sum -c md5sum.txt.asc
    CentOS-5.6-x86_64-bin-DVD-1of2.iso: OK

    As I said, I installed CentOS-5.6 by http without problem.
    I've also installed it by netinstall and on a USB stick.
    But I haven't been able to install it from the hard disk, as I said.
    I'm pretty sure it is a bug in the installer program.

    --
    Timothy Murphy
    e-mail: gayleard /at/ eircom.net
    tel: +353-86-2336090, +353-1-2842366
    s-mail: School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland
  • John Doe at Jun 7, 2011 at 6:04 am
    From: Timothy Murphy <gayleard at eircom.net>
    I tried (several times) installing CentOS-5.6 from a hard disk,
    and each time it failed after installing all the rpms,
    with the warning "The installation has tried to mount image #2,
    but cannot find it on the hard drive."
    ??? md5sum -c md5sum.txt.asc???
    ??? CentOS-5.6-x86_64-bin-DVD-1of2.iso: OK
    The "image #2"... what about 2of2?
    ?Did you check the debug consoles (alt-Fx)?

    JD
  • Timothy Murphy at Jun 7, 2011 at 8:08 am

    John Doe wrote:

    From: Timothy Murphy <gayleard at eircom.net>
    I tried (several times) installing CentOS-5.6 from a hard disk,
    and each time it failed after installing all the rpms,
    with the warning "The installation has tried to mount image #2,
    but cannot find it on the hard drive."
    md5sum -c md5sum.txt.asc
    CentOS-5.6-x86_64-bin-DVD-1of2.iso: OK
    The "image #2"... what about 2of2?
    I suppose there could be something relevant on the 2nd DVD,
    although the first has been sufficient to install in 3 other ways:
    1) via HTTP from another machine on my home LAN;
    2) after copying the DVD-1of2 to a USB stick; and
    3) it was also sufficient on a machine with a DVD drive.
    (The machine I was trying the hard disk install on-
    an HP MicroServer - has no DVD drive.)
    Did you check the debug consoles (alt-Fx)?
    I'm not sure what this is.
    I copied everything in isolinux and images on the DVD
    in several places.

    Now I have to work out how to install Windows on the machine,
    but I daren't ask about that here ...
    I need it because my ISP claims to have tripled the speed
    of my supply, but says I have to run a Windows CD
    to setup the modem he has given me.



    --
    Timothy Murphy
    e-mail: gayleard /at/ eircom.net
    tel: +353-86-2336090, +353-1-2842366
    s-mail: School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland
  • Brunner, Brian T. at Jun 7, 2011 at 8:39 am

    Did you check the debug consoles (alt-Fx)?
    I'm not sure what this is.
    There are several consoles available during install and boot.
    If you hit Alt+F1, you'll see the "regular" install/boot text.
    If you hit Alt+F2, you'll see debug outputs of portions of the
    install/boot process.

    Alt+F3 gives you another console from which you can e.g. run various
    tools (dmesg, ps, df, fsck, etc).
    John Doe (not his real name) suggested looking at these other consoles
    to see what had been printed out during install/boot.


    Insert spiffy .sig here:
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    Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the
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  • Timothy Murphy at Jun 7, 2011 at 10:13 am

    Brunner, Brian T. wrote:

    Did you check the debug consoles (alt-Fx)?
    I'm not sure what this is.
    There are several consoles available during install and boot.
    If you hit Alt+F1, you'll see the "regular" install/boot text.
    If you hit Alt+F2, you'll see debug outputs of portions of the
    install/boot process.
    Thanks.
    Actually I did know about these, though I've never used them.
    I misunderstood the poster; I thought he/she was pointing to a file
    that I should have downloaded.

    In fact there was a Debug button to press when the process failed.
    I looked at the output of this, but it didn't really help.
    It seemed to say that the installation was looking for
    a file in /dev/sdb7//ext2/ where /dev/sdb7 was the device holding the DVD.

    I guess that, as pointed out, this could be something on the 2nd DVD.

    On the other hand, I googled for the error message,
    and it seemed several others had had the same problem.
    That was why I asked if anyone had actually succeeded
    in installing CentOS-5.6 from the hard disk.

    --
    Timothy Murphy
    e-mail: gayleard /at/ eircom.net
    tel: +353-86-2336090, +353-1-2842366
    s-mail: School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland
  • David Bunt at Jun 7, 2011 at 10:18 am
    I guess that, as pointed out, this could be something on the 2nd DVD.
    Try a minimal install. That won't hit the 2nd dvd.

    --
    Head Grunt
    ChickenWare.com
    From concept to the internet..
    866-588-7806
  • Timothy Murphy at Jun 7, 2011 at 1:12 pm

    David Bunt wrote:

    Try a minimal install. That won't hit the 2nd dvd.
    Actually no installation I have done
    (including one with practically everything chosen)
    has ever required the 2nd DVD.

    --
    Timothy Murphy
    e-mail: gayleard /at/ eircom.net
    tel: +353-86-2336090, +353-1-2842366
    s-mail: School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland
  • Mark Roth at Jun 7, 2011 at 9:17 am

    Timothy Murphy wrote:
    John Doe wrote:
    From: Timothy Murphy <gayleard at eircom.net>
    I tried (several times) installing CentOS-5.6 from a hard disk,
    and each time it failed after installing all the rpms,
    with the warning "The installation has tried to mount image #2,
    but cannot find it on the hard drive."
    md5sum -c md5sum.txt.asc
    CentOS-5.6-x86_64-bin-DVD-1of2.iso: OK
    The "image #2"... what about 2of2?
    I suppose there could be something relevant on the 2nd DVD,
    although the first has been sufficient to install in 3 other ways:
    1) via HTTP from another machine on my home LAN;
    2) after copying the DVD-1of2 to a USB stick; and
    3) it was also sufficient on a machine with a DVD drive.
    (The machine I was trying the hard disk install on-
    an HP MicroServer - has no DVD drive.)
    You could put everything on an 8G USB key.
    <snip>
    Now I have to work out how to install Windows on the machine,
    but I daren't ask about that here ...
    I need it because my ISP claims to have tripled the speed
    of my supply, but says I have to run a Windows CD
    to setup the modem he has given me.
    ?? What kind of modem? Linux handles almost everything. Certainly, I
    didn't need to install WinDoze to work with the DSL modem I got from
    Verizon.

    mark
  • Ljubomir Ljubojevic at Jun 7, 2011 at 9:29 am

    m.roth at 5-cent.us wrote:
    Now I have to work out how to install Windows on the machine,
    but I daren't ask about that here ...
    I need it because my ISP claims to have tripled the speed
    of my supply, but says I have to run a Windows CD
    to setup the modem he has given me.
    ?? What kind of modem? Linux handles almost everything. Certainly, I
    didn't need to install WinDoze to work with the DSL modem I got from
    Verizon.

    mark
    You could ask someone to bring their Windowz laptop, set it up and you
    are done. One you set it up like they want, you are not going to need
    that CD again, at least for a while.

    And most xDSL modems have nice web GUI, CD's are mostly used as
    idiot-proof measure with nice colored setup program.

    Ljubomir
  • Mark Roth at Jun 7, 2011 at 9:37 am

    Ljubomir Ljubojevic wrote:
    m.roth at 5-cent.us wrote:
    Now I have to work out how to install Windows on the machine,
    but I daren't ask about that here ...
    I need it because my ISP claims to have tripled the speed
    of my supply, but says I have to run a Windows CD
    to setup the modem he has given me.
    ?? What kind of modem? Linux handles almost everything. Certainly, I
    didn't need to install WinDoze to work with the DSL modem I got from
    Verizon.
    You could ask someone to bring their Windowz laptop, set it up and you
    are done. One you set it up like they want, you are not going to need
    that CD again, at least for a while.

    And most xDSL modems have nice web GUI, CD's are mostly used as
    idiot-proof measure with nice colored setup program.
    Reading this, I'm thinking still more about the bigger picture, there. I
    didn't see the start of this thread - is this a home system? If so, using
    WinDo$e is pointless, if you're running Linux, unless you're running Linux
    in a VM under WinDoze. Lessee, a quick google finds me this:
    <http://www.centos.org/docs/5/html/5.1/Deployment_Guide/s1-network-config-xdsl.html>.

    mark
  • Timothy Murphy at Jun 7, 2011 at 11:18 am

    m.roth at 5-cent.us wrote:

    Reading this, I'm thinking still more about the bigger picture, there. I
    didn't see the start of this thread - is this a home system? If so, using
    WinDo$e is pointless, if you're running Linux, unless you're running Linux
    in a VM under WinDoze.
    The machine is running CentOS-5.6 .
    The modem is running fine, but my speed has not been improved threefold,
    as promised.
    In fact the speed is identical to the previous modem, as far as I can tell.

    I find a Windows dual-boot quite useful on many occasions,
    eg if some card or other device does not work under Linux it is worth seeing
    if it works under Windows.

    Also, if I have to call my ISP (I did once, when the line outside
    was damaged in a storm), it is more or less obligatory to be running Windows
    during the visit.

    I've been running Unix for 30 years, having graduated to Linux from Minix.
    I guess my philosophy is closer to Linus Torvalds than Richard Stallman.


    --
    Timothy Murphy
    e-mail: gayleard /at/ eircom.net
    tel: +353-86-2336090, +353-1-2842366
    s-mail: School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland
  • Les Mikesell at Jun 7, 2011 at 11:59 am

    On 6/7/2011 10:18 AM, Timothy Murphy wrote:
    The machine is running CentOS-5.6 .
    The modem is running fine, but my speed has not been improved threefold,
    as promised.
    In fact the speed is identical to the previous modem, as far as I can tell.
    Do you know what kind of change this was supposed to be? If you are
    running DSL with PPOE it might have been a registry tweak for windows to
    reduce the MTU. On Centos you can just put MTU= in your ifcfg-eth? file
    with the value you want (I've seen 1492 suggested for this). If it is a
    cablemodem it doesn't make much sense to need to do anything under windows.

    --
    Les Mikesell
    lesmikesell at gmail.com
  • Lamar Owen at Jun 7, 2011 at 12:45 pm

    On Tuesday, June 07, 2011 11:59:52 AM Les Mikesell wrote:
    On 6/7/2011 10:18 AM, Timothy Murphy wrote:
    The modem is running fine, but my speed has not been improved threefold,
    as promised.
    In fact the speed is identical to the previous modem, as far as I can tell.
    Do you know what kind of change this was supposed to be?
    It might be a firmware update, or a download accelerator (which requires ISP cache support) installer.

    Something like NetZero, that uses special compression between the cache provider and the consumer that makes things seem to load faster. In which case you have to have Windows to run the client side of the compressed cache stream. This also interacts with the browser cache, and actually resizes typically too-large images down, something like what a PDF creator would do for embedded images to go to the actual PDF dpi setting.
  • Timothy Murphy at Jun 7, 2011 at 1:04 pm

    Les Mikesell wrote:

    The machine is running CentOS-5.6 .
    The modem is running fine, but my speed has not been improved threefold,
    as promised.
    In fact the speed is identical to the previous modem, as far as I can
    tell.
    Do you know what kind of change this was supposed to be?
    No. I was rung one day by a lady at my ISP (Eircom),
    who told me I had been chosen as a recipient of their new "Ultimate" system,
    which would increase my speed from 5Mb/s to 14Mb/s,
    at no extra cost!
    Apparently this was not available to any old customer;
    I had been specially picked out for the privilege.
    I can't think of any reason why I should be picked out,
    except that I always pay my bills.

    (I have been with them for ever, and remember being told by them long ago
    that scientists had proved it was physically impossible
    for traffic down a telephone line to exceed 300b/s .)
    If you are
    running DSL with PPOE it might have been a registry tweak for windows to
    reduce the MTU. On Centos you can just put MTU= in your ifcfg-eth? file
    with the value you want (I've seen 1492 suggested for this).
    It is PPPoE, I think.
    I'll try changing the MTU sometime, and see if it has any effect.
    Thanks for the suggestion.


    --
    Timothy Murphy
    e-mail: gayleard /at/ eircom.net
    tel: +353-86-2336090, +353-1-2842366
    s-mail: School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland
  • Lamar Owen at Jun 7, 2011 at 1:20 pm

    On Tuesday, June 07, 2011 01:04:11 PM Timothy Murphy wrote:
    who told me I had been chosen as a recipient of their new "Ultimate" system,
    which would increase my speed from 5Mb/s to 14Mb/s,
    at no extra cost!
    The speed increase is possible, for sure, as long as you're close enough to the DSLAM. We have an 11Mb/s DSL option here, but it does require improved hardware (ADSL2+).

    The modem wants a password for management; you'll need to google for the default modem password for that particular model to be able to start management without the CD. Using the modem manufacturer's CD allows an easy setup for Windows, typically, and walks you through the install, but it's very rarely actually required, unless it does have a firmware update on it.
  • Thomas Harold at Jun 7, 2011 at 2:54 pm

    On 6/7/2011 1:04 PM, Timothy Murphy wrote:
    No. I was rung one day by a lady at my ISP (Eircom), who told me I
    had been chosen as a recipient of their new "Ultimate" system, which
    would increase my speed from 5Mb/s to 14Mb/s, at no extra cost!
    Could be newer DSL technology, or could simply be some sort of caching
    and compression system that you have to use Windows client software to
    take advantage of it. But it sounds like new DSL technology according
    to the press release and sales site.

    http://pressroom.eircom.net/press_releases/article/eircom_launches_up_to_24mb_next_generation_broadband/

    Digging through their FAQ site:
    Do I need to change any equipment or settings on my computer?

    No, you don't need to change anything. Your modem will pick up the
    new speed automatically. A very limited number of customers may be
    required to 'turn off' and 'turn on' their modem for the upgrade to
    take affect.
    Maybe the Windows CD needs to install new firmware.
    How will I know that my line/broadband was upgraded?

    If you are an eligible customer eircom will send a letter to you in
    advance notifying you that you will be migrated to the Next
    Generation Broadband product in the near future.

    Alternatively, if you visit www.eircom.net/ngb and go to the: "How
    Can I Get it?" section. Then enter your eircom telephone number and
    account number and you will be informed if your broadband has been or
    is scheduled to be upgraded to a Next Generation Broadband product.
    And maybe double-check that the line was actually upgraded?
  • Timothy Murphy at Jun 7, 2011 at 11:07 am

    Ljubomir Ljubojevic wrote:

    You could ask someone to bring their Windowz laptop, set it up and you
    are done.
    Actually I always leave or install a small Windows partition
    on my Linux machines.
    I find that I occasionally need them, eg when updating firmware.

    I don't have the religious objections many Linux users have.
    As Henry IV said, "Paris is worth a mass".
    And most xDSL modems have nice web GUI, CD's are mostly used as
    idiot-proof measure with nice colored setup program.
    In this case, when I go to the modem web-page (192.168.1.254)
    it asks me to insert the CD "for further information".

    --
    Timothy Murphy
    e-mail: gayleard /at/ eircom.net
    tel: +353-86-2336090, +353-1-2842366
    s-mail: School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland
  • Timothy Murphy at Jun 7, 2011 at 11:00 am

    m.roth at 5-cent.us wrote:

    I suppose there could be something relevant on the 2nd DVD,
    although the first has been sufficient to install in 3 other ways:
    1) via HTTP from another machine on my home LAN;
    2) after copying the DVD-1of2 to a USB stick; and
    3) it was also sufficient on a machine with a DVD drive.
    (The machine I was trying the hard disk install on-
    an HP MicroServer - has no DVD drive.)
    You could put everything on an 8G USB key.
    As I mentioned, I had already installed CentOS on a USB key,
    using just the first DVD.
    I was really just experimenting with a hard disk installation.
    Now I have to work out how to install Windows on the machine,
    but I daren't ask about that here ...
    I need it because my ISP claims to have tripled the speed
    of my supply, but says I have to run a Windows CD
    to setup the modem he has given me.
    ?? What kind of modem? Linux handles almost everything. Certainly, I
    didn't need to install WinDoze to work with the DSL modem I got from
    Verizon.
    The modem is a ZyXEL P-660HW-T1 WiFi modem/router (made in China).
    It works fine, but my speed is not 3 times what it was before!
    My ISP (Eircom) claims I have to run the configuration utility
    on the Windows CD to get "up to speed".
    I doubt if this is true, but I guess I ought to try it.



    --
    Timothy Murphy
    e-mail: gayleard /at/ eircom.net
    tel: +353-86-2336090, +353-1-2842366
    s-mail: School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland
  • Mark Roth at Jun 7, 2011 at 11:22 am

    Timothy Murphy wrote:
    m.roth at 5-cent.us wrote:
    <snip>
    Now I have to work out how to install Windows on the machine,
    but I daren't ask about that here ...
    I need it because my ISP claims to have tripled the speed
    of my supply, but says I have to run a Windows CD
    to setup the modem he has given me.
    ?? What kind of modem? Linux handles almost everything. Certainly, I
    didn't need to install WinDoze to work with the DSL modem I got from
    Verizon.
    The modem is a ZyXEL P-660HW-T1 WiFi modem/router (made in China).
    It works fine, but my speed is not 3 times what it was before!
    My ISP (Eircom) claims I have to run the configuration utility
    on the Windows CD to get "up to speed".
    I doubt if this is true, but I guess I ought to try it.
    It is *not* true. The only thing that I can imagine that software doing is
    setting it up for Windows, and Windows only.

    Right, I just looked it up, and I see it's an ADSL modem. Look at your IP
    address, and I'll bet you're 192.168.0.x, or 192.168.1.x. Whatever it is,
    try pinging 192.168.[0 or 1].1. Whichever it is, pull up your browser, and
    point it to that IP, and you should be at the modem's web interface, and
    you can go from there.

    mark
  • B.j. mcclure at Jun 7, 2011 at 11:46 am

    On Tue, 2011-06-07 at 11:22 -0400, m.roth at 5-cent.us wrote:
    Timothy Murphy wrote:
    m.roth at 5-cent.us wrote:
    <snip>
    Now I have to work out how to install Windows on the machine,
    but I daren't ask about that here ...
    I need it because my ISP claims to have tripled the speed
    of my supply, but says I have to run a Windows CD
    to setup the modem he has given me.
    ?? What kind of modem? Linux handles almost everything. Certainly, I
    didn't need to install WinDoze to work with the DSL modem I got from
    Verizon.
    The modem is a ZyXEL P-660HW-T1 WiFi modem/router (made in China).
    It works fine, but my speed is not 3 times what it was before!
    My ISP (Eircom) claims I have to run the configuration utility
    on the Windows CD to get "up to speed".
    I doubt if this is true, but I guess I ought to try it.
    It is *not* true. The only thing that I can imagine that software doing is
    setting it up for Windows, and Windows only.

    Right, I just looked it up, and I see it's an ADSL modem. Look at your IP
    address, and I'll bet you're 192.168.0.x, or 192.168.1.x. Whatever it is,
    try pinging 192.168.[0 or 1].1. Whichever it is, pull up your browser, and
    point it to that IP, and you should be at the modem's web interface, and
    you can go from there.

    mark
    Or 192.168.1.254
    B.J.

    CentOS 5.6, Linux 2.6.18-238.12.1.el5
  • Timothy Murphy at Jun 7, 2011 at 1:10 pm

    b.j. mcclure wrote:

    Right, I just looked it up, and I see it's an ADSL modem. Look at your IP
    address, and I'll bet you're 192.168.0.x, or 192.168.1.x. Whatever it is,
    try pinging 192.168.[0 or 1].1. Whichever it is, pull up your browser,
    and point it to that IP, and you should be at the modem's web interface,
    and you can go from there.

    mark
    Or 192.168.1.254
    Actually, the modem's web-page is at 192.168.1.254 ,
    but I'm told I need a password to go further.
    My password with my ISP did not work,
    and strangely I was never asked for my username.
    The only other information on the web-page
    is the suggestion that I should run the CD.

    In fact I've gone back to my old modem,
    as I have some pin-holes opened there.

    --
    Timothy Murphy
    e-mail: gayleard /at/ eircom.net
    tel: +353-86-2336090, +353-1-2842366
    s-mail: School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland
  • Mark Roth at Jun 7, 2011 at 1:54 pm

    Timothy Murphy wrote:
    b.j. mcclure wrote:
    Right, I just looked it up, and I see it's an ADSL modem. Look at your
    IP address, and I'll bet you're 192.168.0.x, or 192.168.1.x. Whatever it
    is, try pinging 192.168.[0 or 1].1. Whichever it is, pull up your
    browser, and point it to that IP, and you should be at the modem's web
    interface, and you can go from there.
    Or 192.168.1.254
    Actually, the modem's web-page is at 192.168.1.254 ,
    but I'm told I need a password to go further.
    My password with my ISP did not work,
    Nope. It may be the default setting password that the OEM assigns. Ask
    your ISP what the password is. For my old Westell, it was something like
    password, something dumb. I got in and changed it, of course. Resetting
    the original settings, including the password, was push a button.
    and strangely I was never asked for my username.
    The only other information on the web-page
    is the suggestion that I should run the CD.
    Unless there's some firmware update on the CD, the only thing it would do
    is the Windows settings.
    In fact I've gone back to my old modem,
    as I have some pin-holes opened there.
    <g>

    mark
  • Ljubomir Ljubojevic at Jun 7, 2011 at 5:35 pm

    m.roth at 5-cent.us wrote:
    Timothy Murphy wrote:
    b.j. mcclure wrote:
    Right, I just looked it up, and I see it's an ADSL modem. Look at your
    IP address, and I'll bet you're 192.168.0.x, or 192.168.1.x. Whatever it
    is, try pinging 192.168.[0 or 1].1. Whichever it is, pull up your
    browser, and point it to that IP, and you should be at the modem's web
    interface, and you can go from there.
    Or 192.168.1.254
    Actually, the modem's web-page is at 192.168.1.254 ,
    but I'm told I need a password to go further.
    My password with my ISP did not work,
    Nope. It may be the default setting password that the OEM assigns. Ask
    your ISP what the password is. For my old Westell, it was something like
    password, something dumb. I got in and changed it, of course. Resetting
    the original settings, including the password, was push a button.
    and strangely I was never asked for my username.
    The only other information on the web-page
    is the suggestion that I should run the CD.
    Unless there's some firmware update on the CD, the only thing it would do
    is the Windows settings.
    In fact I've gone back to my old modem,
    as I have some pin-holes opened there.
    <g>

    mark
    National ADSL company uses Thompson ADSL modems with wireless with
    custom password for each unit, if I got that correctly. It is definitely
    not OEM password. I guess they used different passwords to prevent
    others hacking into router via wireless.

    And they use different password for actual PPPoE connection. First
    (Huawei) modems they used even lacked the option to change or even see
    PPPoE username and password.

    Ljubomir
  • Thomas Harold at Jun 7, 2011 at 12:28 pm

    On 6/7/2011 11:22 AM, m.roth at 5-cent.us wrote:
    Timothy Murphy wrote:

    Right, I just looked it up, and I see it's an ADSL modem. Look at your IP
    address, and I'll bet you're 192.168.0.x, or 192.168.1.x. Whatever it is,
    try pinging 192.168.[0 or 1].1. Whichever it is, pull up your browser, and
    point it to that IP, and you should be at the modem's web interface, and
    you can go from there.
    Or, assuming that it hands out a DHCP address with a default gateway
    (and the modem/NAT unit is acting as the default gateway):

    a) Look for the default route (indicated as the line starting with
    0.0.0.0 for IPv4)

    # route -n
    0.0.0.0 192.168.0.1 0.0.0.0 UG

    b) Look at the dhclient.leases file. This can be hit or miss, depending
    on whether you can find the proper section. Other distros put it in a
    slightly different location.

    /var/lib/dhclient/dhclient.leases
    lease {
    interface "eth1";
    fixed-address 192.168.1.186;
    option subnet-mask 255.255.255.0;
    option routers 192.168.1.1;
    option dhcp-lease-time 3600;
    option dhcp-message-type 5;
    option domain-name-servers 192.168.1.1;
    option dhcp-server-identifier 192.168.1.1;
    option domain-name "lan.example.org";
    renew 3 2009/4/8 11:57:39;
    rebind 3 2009/4/8 12:21:03;
    expire 3 2009/4/8 12:28:33;
    }

    c) Or the "ip" command.

    $ ip route list
    default via 192.168.1.1 dev eth0 proto static

    (Guessing about IP addresses gets harder in a few years once IPv6
    finally goes mainstream.)
  • Jussi Hirvi at Jun 7, 2011 at 9:16 am

    On 7.6.2011 1.19, Timothy Murphy wrote:
    But I'm not sure what "image #2" is? Or where it should be put?
    images/stage2.img ??

    -Jussi
  • Timothy Murphy at Jun 7, 2011 at 10:21 am

    Jussi Hirvi wrote:
    On 7.6.2011 1.19, Timothy Murphy wrote:
    But I'm not sure what "image #2" is? Or where it should be put?
    images/stage2.img ??
    I assumed that was what was meant,
    and put copies of this file everywhere I could think of:
    in the same place as the DVD, in an images directory there,
    on the /boot partition, etc.
    But none of them satsified the installer.

    I thought it slightly silly that the installer does not say
    exactly what file it is looking for
    (and where it expected to find it).

    In my experience this is not uncommon in Linux programs;
    you are told that something is missing,
    but precisely what is left to the imagination.
    Presumably the program must know exactly what it is looking for,
    so I don't understand why the information cannot be passed on.

    --
    Timothy Murphy
    e-mail: gayleard /at/ eircom.net
    tel: +353-86-2336090, +353-1-2842366
    s-mail: School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland

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