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I had to install 5.5 from scratch and now I have to rebuild my home networking system.

I haven't had to mess with this stuff in over 5+ years and I'm sure there may be better ways of doing it now.

My liunx box acts as firewall/gateway for 2 other pcs. I was using a script from the Linux IP Masquerade HOWTO with ddclient (since I have a dynamic ip).

Also, I don't think I need a full name server. Can I get by with a caching nameserver?

Thanks!!

Eddie

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  • Enrique Verdes at May 19, 2010 at 1:55 pm

    El mi?, 19-05-2010 a las 09:42 -0400, tdukes at sc.rr.com escribi?:
    I had to install 5.5 from scratch and now I have to rebuild my home networking system.

    I haven't had to mess with this stuff in over 5+ years and I'm sure there may be better ways of doing it now.

    My liunx box acts as firewall/gateway for 2 other pcs. I was using a script from the Linux IP Masquerade HOWTO with ddclient (since I have a dynamic ip).

    Also, I don't think I need a full name server. Can I get by with a caching nameserver?
    Yes, you don't need more than that for your home network.
    Thanks!!

    Eddie


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  • Mark Roth at May 19, 2010 at 2:10 pm

    I had to install 5.5 from scratch and now I have to rebuild my home
    networking system. Oy!
    I haven't had to mess with this stuff in over 5+ years and I'm sure there
    may be better ways of doing it now.
    Unless you're dealing with many systems all the time, that's the way it
    always is. I got openLDAP (gag!) working in '06, and upgraded in '08, but
    I'd have to do heavy research to redo that today.
    My liunx box acts as firewall/gateway for 2 other pcs. I was using a
    script from the Linux IP Masquerade HOWTO with ddclient (since I have a
    dynamic ip).
    Have you run Bastille on the firewall/gateway?
    Also, I don't think I need a full name server. Can I get by with a caching
    nameserver?
    I never set one up, and have been meaning to for a while. I'm interested
    in the answer.

    mark
  • Kwan Lowe at May 19, 2010 at 2:30 pm

    On Wed, May 19, 2010 at 9:42 AM, wrote:
    I had to install 5.5 from scratch and now I have to rebuild my home networking system.

    I haven't had to mess with this stuff in over 5+ years and I'm sure there may be better ways of doing it now.

    My liunx box acts as firewall/gateway for 2 other pcs. I was using a script from the Linux IP Masquerade HOWTO with ddclient (since I have a dynamic ip).
    Though there are many benefits to running gateway services through a
    Linux system, for the past couple years I've opted for an inexpensive
    wireless router that has been properly secured. It came down to power
    utilization as the Linux machine used about 10 times as much power as
    the dedicated router.

    As to benefits, I do run a Squid proxy server on my network. My
    internet connection is not the fastest and I've seen pretty good cache
    hit percentage (hovering near 30%-50%).
    Also, I don't think I need a full name server. Can I get by with a caching nameserver?
    Yes, certainly. However, there are some benefits to running a full
    nameserver especially if you have any wireless devices that may need
    to use printers, file servers, etc.. For example, I can connect a
    wireless laptop and print to HPLaser1 or access the fileshare as
    \\fileserver\. When I change the fileserver it's a simple matter of
    pointing my alias over to the new server.
  • Les Mikesell at May 19, 2010 at 2:31 pm

    On 5/19/2010 8:42 AM, tdukes at sc.rr.com wrote:
    I had to install 5.5 from scratch and now I have to rebuild my home networking system.

    I haven't had to mess with this stuff in over 5+ years and I'm sure there may be better ways of doing it now.

    My liunx box acts as firewall/gateway for 2 other pcs. I was using a script from the Linux IP Masquerade HOWTO with ddclient (since I have a dynamic ip).

    Also, I don't think I need a full name server. Can I get by with a caching nameserver?
    If you are starting from scratch and don't know your way around the
    linux system, why not use one of the 'appliance' style distributions
    like ClearOS (fairly new) or SMEserver (older but still works)? These
    are based on CentOS code but have a simple web interface for
    configuration and will probably set up the firewalling/NAT better than
    you would do by yourself.

    But to answer your question - the only difference between the caching
    nameserver package and a normal nameserver is that the caching version
    will overwrite your local configs on updates (since you shouldn't have
    made any changes). If you want to have a local zone for your own
    machines - even if it isn't official or public, you don't want the
    caching version.

    --
    Les Mikesell
    lesmikesell at gmail.com
  • Kanwar Ranbir Sandhu at May 19, 2010 at 6:17 pm

    On Wed, 2010-05-19 at 09:31 -0500, Les Mikesell wrote:
    If you are starting from scratch and don't know your way around the
    linux system, why not use one of the 'appliance' style distributions
    like ClearOS (fairly new) or SMEserver (older but still works)? These
    are based on CentOS code but have a simple web interface for
    configuration and will probably set up the firewalling/NAT better than
    you would do by yourself.
    ClearOS looks awesome. Have you tried it?

    Regards,

    Ranbir
  • Thomas Dukes at May 20, 2010 at 12:42 am

    -----Original Message-----
    From: centos-bounces at centos.org
    [mailto:centos-bounces at centos.org] On Behalf Of Kanwar Ranbir Sandhu
    Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2010 2:17 PM
    To: centos at centos.org
    Subject: Re: [CentOS] Networking setup/help
    On Wed, 2010-05-19 at 09:31 -0500, Les Mikesell wrote:
    If you are starting from scratch and don't know your way around the
    linux system, why not use one of the 'appliance' style
    distributions
    like ClearOS (fairly new) or SMEserver (older but still
    works)? These
    are based on CentOS code but have a simple web interface for
    configuration and will probably set up the firewalling/NAT
    better than
    you would do by yourself.
    ClearOS looks awesome. Have you tried it?

    Regards,

    Ranbir
    No, I haven't even heard of it. :-(

    I've been with CentOS for a long time. Ran RedHat for a longtime, since
    around 2.0, the went to Fedora, got tired of stuff not working, so I
    switched to CentOS.

    I'm not an IT guy. I have a website that I use it for testing, etc. This is
    only about the 3rd 'clean' install I've done since about 1997. I had 5.5
    installed as an upgrade until I mucked up an app and tried to restore it
    from backup and hosed everything. Now I'm trying to play catch up.

    I now have my local network able to connect to the internet. Don't have DNS
    setup yet or sendmail. I'm a little afraid to try to restore those files
    from my backup as that's what got me in trouble.

    I will say, everything is running a lot faster so maybe this wasn't so bad
    after all.

    Thanks,

    Eddie
  • Les Mikesell at May 20, 2010 at 1:29 am

    Kanwar Ranbir Sandhu wrote:
    On Wed, 2010-05-19 at 09:31 -0500, Les Mikesell wrote:
    If you are starting from scratch and don't know your way around the
    linux system, why not use one of the 'appliance' style distributions
    like ClearOS (fairly new) or SMEserver (older but still works)? These
    are based on CentOS code but have a simple web interface for
    configuration and will probably set up the firewalling/NAT better than
    you would do by yourself.
    ClearOS looks awesome. Have you tried it?
    I don't have a real use for it right now but I have one running under vmware to
    test and migrated some big imap mailboxes over from an old smeserver. It seems
    to be very well done with a very responsive web interface for management.

    --
    Les Mikesell
    lesmikesell at gmail.com
  • Thomas Dukes at May 20, 2010 at 1:42 am

    -----Original Message-----
    From: centos-bounces at centos.org
    [mailto:centos-bounces at centos.org] On Behalf Of Les Mikesell
    Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2010 9:29 PM
    To: CentOS mailing list
    Subject: Re: [CentOS] Networking setup/help

    Kanwar Ranbir Sandhu wrote:
    On Wed, 2010-05-19 at 09:31 -0500, Les Mikesell wrote:
    If you are starting from scratch and don't know your way
    around the
    linux system, why not use one of the 'appliance' style
    distributions
    like ClearOS (fairly new) or SMEserver (older but still works)?
    These are based on CentOS code but have a simple web interface for
    configuration and will probably set up the firewalling/NAT better
    than you would do by yourself.
    ClearOS looks awesome. Have you tried it?
    I don't have a real use for it right now but I have one
    running under vmware to test and migrated some big imap
    mailboxes over from an old smeserver. It seems to be very
    well done with a very responsive web interface for management.
    I like CentOS. While it might not be for the average Joe (me), the folks
    here are really helpful and knowlegeable.

    Did a really short stint with 'White Box' until that kinda fizzled.

    I have no reason to leave CentOS.

    Eddie
  • Les Mikesell at May 20, 2010 at 2:45 am

    Thomas Dukes wrote:
    -----Original Message-----
    From: centos-bounces at centos.org
    [mailto:centos-bounces at centos.org] On Behalf Of Les Mikesell
    Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2010 9:29 PM
    To: CentOS mailing list
    Subject: Re: [CentOS] Networking setup/help

    Kanwar Ranbir Sandhu wrote:
    On Wed, 2010-05-19 at 09:31 -0500, Les Mikesell wrote:
    If you are starting from scratch and don't know your way
    around the
    linux system, why not use one of the 'appliance' style
    distributions
    like ClearOS (fairly new) or SMEserver (older but still works)?
    These are based on CentOS code but have a simple web interface for
    configuration and will probably set up the firewalling/NAT better
    than you would do by yourself.
    ClearOS looks awesome. Have you tried it?
    I don't have a real use for it right now but I have one
    running under vmware to test and migrated some big imap
    mailboxes over from an old smeserver. It seems to be very
    well done with a very responsive web interface for management.
    I like CentOS. While it might not be for the average Joe (me), the folks
    here are really helpful and knowlegeable.

    Did a really short stint with 'White Box' until that kinda fizzled.

    I have no reason to leave CentOS.
    ClearOS really is CentOS as far as most of the code goes. It just comes with a
    simple web interface to mange setup of services that would otherwise be
    moderately hard to get right on your own (firewalling, cyrus email server, ldap
    user directory, dns, vpn, etc.). You could easily turn it over to someone you
    wouldn't trust with the root password to a bare normal linux box.

    --
    Les Mikesell
    lesmikesell at gmail.com

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