FAQ
Hi List

I'm new to centos i'm also on the forum but my question is how do i do a dual boot say windows/centos

i no i have to partition the harddrive can i do this in centos..\

could someone help us out

Mike
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  • Hanmo at Aug 21, 2009 at 3:38 am
    When install the system, please format the disk and leave the free space to the linux.
    Intall the xp firstly, then install the centos on the free space.
    Use the grub to load these two system.


    2009-08-21



    Hanmo



    ???? Michael Wright
    ????? 2009-08-21 10:39:33
    ???? centos at centos.org
    ???
    ??? [CentOS] Dual Booting Question

    Hi List

    I'm new to centos i'm also on the forum but my question is how do i do a dual boot say windows/centos

    i no i have to partition the harddrive can i do this in centos..\

    could someone help us out

    Mike
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  • Michael Wright at Aug 22, 2009 at 2:07 am
    I CAN UNDER STAND THAT BIT BUT NOT THE GRUB

    MIKE
    ----- Original Message -----
    From: Hanmo
    To: CentOS mailing list ; centos at centos.org
    Sent: Friday, August 21, 2009 1:38 PM
    Subject: Re: [CentOS] Dual Booting Question


    When install the system, please format the disk and leave the free space to the linux.
    Intall the xp firstly, then install the centos on the free space.
    Use the grub to load these two system.


    2009-08-21

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Hanmo

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    ???? Michael Wright
    ????? 2009-08-21 10:39:33
    ???? centos at centos.org
    ???
    ??? [CentOS] Dual Booting Question
    Hi List

    I'm new to centos i'm also on the forum but my question is how do i do a dual boot say windows/centos

    i no i have to partition the harddrive can i do this in centos..\

    could someone help us out

    Mike


    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    _______________________________________________
    CentOS mailing list
    CentOS at centos.org
    http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos



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  • Chaz Sliger at Aug 22, 2009 at 3:00 am
    I use Symantec?s Norton Partition Magic to carve up the disk, usually into 3 partitions (NTFS for windows, FAT32 for moving files between windows and linux, and a linux partition).

    You?ll need to copy the linux bootloader into the Master Boot Record and then set it up so you can choose which OS to boot.

    -chaz



    _____

    From: centos-bounces at centos.org [mailto:centos-bounces at centos.org] On Behalf Of Michael Wright
    Sent: Friday, August 21, 2009 7:07 PM
    To: CentOS mailing list
    Subject: Re: [CentOS] Dual Booting Question



    I CAN UNDER STAND THAT BIT BUT NOT THE GRUB



    MIKE

    ----- Original Message -----

    From: Hanmo <mailto:hanmochine at gmail.com>

    To: CentOS mailing list <mailto:centos at centos.org> ; centos at centos.org

    Sent: Friday, August 21, 2009 1:38 PM

    Subject: Re: [CentOS] Dual Booting Question



    When install the system, please format the disk and leave the free space to the linux.

    Intall the xp firstly, then install the centos on the free space.

    Use the grub to load these two system.





    2009-08-21


    _____


    Hanmo


    _____


    ???? Michael Wright

    ????? 2009-08-21 10:39:33

    ???? centos at centos.org

    ???

    ??? [CentOS] Dual Booting Question

    Hi List



    I'm new to centos i'm also on the forum but my question is how do i do a dual boot say windows/centos



    i no i have to partition the harddrive can i do this in centos..\



    could someone help us out



    Mike


    _____


    _______________________________________________
    CentOS mailing list
    CentOS at centos.org
    http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos


    _____



    No virus found in this incoming message.
    Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
    Version: 8.5.392 / Virus Database: 270.13.64/2318 - Release Date: 08/21/09 18:06:00

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  • Ron Blizzard at Aug 23, 2009 at 6:12 am
    On Fri, Aug 21, 2009 at 10:00 PM, Chaz Sligerwrote:
    I use Symantec?s Norton Partition Magic to carve up the disk, usually into 3
    partitions (NTFS for windows, FAT32 for moving files between windows and
    linux, and a linux partition).

    You?ll need to copy the linux bootloader into the Master Boot Record and
    then set it up so you can choose which OS to boot.
    I used to use Partition Magic all the time. Still have version 8, I
    think. But I carry Puppy Linux around on thumb drive and it's just
    more convenient.

    As for copying the bootloader into the MBR, isn't that Grub's default
    setup? I think Grub is pretty much automatic if let it be.

    --
    RonB -- Using CentOS 5.3
  • David McGuffey at Aug 25, 2009 at 2:29 am

    On Fri, 2009-08-21 at 20:00 -0700, Chaz Sliger wrote:
    ?
    I use Symantec?s Norton Partition Magic to carve up the disk, usually
    into 3 partitions (NTFS for windows, FAT32 for moving files between
    windows and linux, and a linux partition).

    You?ll need to copy the linux bootloader into the Master Boot Record
    and then set it up so you can choose which OS to boot.

    -chaz
    When it comes time to install Linux in dual-boot mode, I always use that
    opportunity to blow away Windoze and do a fresh install on a portion of
    the disk before letting Linux have the rest. After a few months Windoze
    can get loaded up with a lot of junk and get slow and quirky.

    If for some reason you can't do that, then the Partition Magic route
    also works. But...back up the Windoze data first. PM is not always
    100% fool-proof.

    Dave M
  • Johnny Hughes at Aug 25, 2009 at 12:28 pm

    David McGuffey wrote:
    On Fri, 2009-08-21 at 20:00 -0700, Chaz Sliger wrote:
    ?
    I use Symantec?s Norton Partition Magic to carve up the disk, usually
    into 3 partitions (NTFS for windows, FAT32 for moving files between
    windows and linux, and a linux partition).

    You?ll need to copy the linux bootloader into the Master Boot Record
    and then set it up so you can choose which OS to boot.

    -chaz
    When it comes time to install Linux in dual-boot mode, I always use that
    opportunity to blow away Windoze and do a fresh install on a portion of
    the disk before letting Linux have the rest. After a few months Windoze
    can get loaded up with a lot of junk and get slow and quirky.

    If for some reason you can't do that, then the Partition Magic route
    also works. But...back up the Windoze data first. PM is not always
    100% fool-proof.
    Now days, if the machine is fairly decent, I just install windows in a
    Virtual Machine.

    I like Sun's Virtual Box on CentOS to run my Windows Hosts ... others
    use different things like VMWare.

    You can get virtual box here:

    http://www.virtualbox.org/

    The great thing about a VM is that you can use both the Windows machine
    and the Linux machine at the same time.

    The bad thing is that it can be slow if you do not have enough RAM or CPU.

    I have a laptop with a Pentium M 2.2 GHz processor and 2 GB RAM and I
    run a Windows XP VM with 512MB RAM on top if CentOS 5.

    Thanks,
    Johnny Hughes



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  • Ron Blizzard at Aug 25, 2009 at 6:28 pm

    On Tue, Aug 25, 2009 at 7:28 AM, Johnny Hugheswrote:

    Now days, if the machine is fairly decent, I just install windows in a
    Virtual Machine.

    I like Sun's Virtual Box on CentOS to run my Windows Hosts ... others
    use different things like VMWare.

    You can get virtual box here:

    http://www.virtualbox.org/

    The great thing about a VM is that you can use both the Windows machine
    and the Linux machine at the same time.

    The bad thing is that it can be slow if you do not have enough RAM or CPU.

    I have a laptop with a Pentium M 2.2 GHz processor and 2 GB RAM and I
    run a Windows XP VM with 512MB RAM on top if CentOS 5.
    That's how I run Windows on everything except my laptop, which only
    has 512 Meg of RAM. I first used VirtualBox on an openSUSE machine
    with 768 Megs of RAM and a 1.5 Ghz Pentium 4 CPU. XP worked fine, but
    I found out I could use a smaller virtual machine (and give it less
    memory) if I used Windows 2000. And I really don't need XP for the few
    programs I run in Windows. My CentOS desktop computer is a 2.8 Ghz
    Pentium 4 with 1 Gig of RAM and Win2K runs great in it. I sure hope
    Oracle doesn't mess up VirtualBox.

    --
    RonB -- Using CentOS 5.3
  • Ron Blizzard at Aug 23, 2009 at 6:07 am

    On Fri, Aug 21, 2009 at 9:07 PM, Michael Wrightwrote:
    I CAN UNDER STAND THAT BIT BUT NOT THE GRUB

    MIKE
    Unless I'm misremembering, Grub finds your Windows partition and sets
    itself up for you. Just hit "e" when CentOS starts to boot to see your
    other choices.

    If you want your computer to boot by default to Windows, just edit the
    'menu.lst' file in /boot/grub -- you'll have to logged in as root (or
    su) to do that. If you want to see all your choices each time your
    computer boots, comment out the 'hiddenmenu' line. If you want more
    time to choose an OS (the default is 5 seconds) you can also change
    that at the same place.

    Good luck.

    --
    RonB -- Using CentOS 5.3
  • Ron Blizzard at Aug 21, 2009 at 6:21 pm

    On Thu, Aug 20, 2009 at 9:38 PM, Michael Wrightwrote:
    Hi List

    I'm new to centos i'm also on the forum but my question is how do i do a
    dual boot say windows/centos

    i no i have to partition the harddrive can i do this in centos..\

    could someone help us out

    Mike
    Hi Mike,

    I don't know if you can repartition with CentOS as you install, or not
    -- I don't think you can. I use Puppy Linux for this. One of its
    included utilities is GParted, which is a lot like Partition Magic and
    it lets you resize your Windows partition to make room for CentOS.

    You also download a GParted Live CD, though the ISO is about the same
    size as the Puppy Linux ISO and, with Puppy, you get a complete
    desktop OS.

    Puppy Linux is at: http://puppylinux.org/

    GParted Live is at: http://gparted.sourceforge.net/download.php

    There is also a PartedMagic Live CD -- but I think it's just a fancier
    front-end.

    Once you've got your new partition you might want to check out the Red
    Hat dual booting page. I think it's pretty much up to date.

    http://www.redhat.com/advice/tips/dualboot.html

    Good luck. I've still got my laptop dual-booting, but for everything
    else, when I want to run Windows (getting to be a rarity) I use a
    virtual machine in VirtualBox.

    --
    RonB -- Using CentOS 5.3
  • Julian Thomas at Aug 21, 2009 at 9:58 pm

    On Fri, 21 Aug 2009 13:21:17 -0500 Ron Blizzard wrote:

    I don't know if you can repartition with CentOS as you install, or not
    -- I don't think you can. I use Puppy Linux for this. One of its
    included utilities is GParted, which is a lot like Partition Magic and
    it lets you resize your Windows partition to make room for CentOS.
    Even better would be to partition the disk into a primary partition large enough for XP and the rest free space,
    and then install CentOS in the free space.

    --
    Julian Thomas: jt at jt-mj.net http://jt-mj.net
    In the beautiful Genesee Valley of Western New York State!
    -- --
    Oops, my bad! Was I not supposed to pack up the kitten and the snakes together?

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