FAQ
Currently, my time server is a Sun v240 with a 32-pci gps card (with a
proprietary Solaris driver) attached to our gps receiver via an sma
cable up to the roof of my building. As I'm migrating almost all of
our Solaris servers and services over to CentOS, I'd like to know what
other people are using for time server hardware. Any suggestions?

--
Andy Harrison
public key: 0x67518262

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  • Bowie Bailey at Jul 21, 2009 at 8:23 pm

    Andy Harrison wrote:
    Currently, my time server is a Sun v240 with a 32-pci gps card (with a
    proprietary Solaris driver) attached to our gps receiver via an sma
    cable up to the roof of my building. As I'm migrating almost all of
    our Solaris servers and services over to CentOS, I'd like to know what
    other people are using for time server hardware. Any suggestions?
    Since we don't have any pressing need for a high-precision time source,
    we just sync our main server to the public ntp.org pool and then have
    everything else in the building sync to the main server.

    --
    Bowie
  • Andy Harrison at Jul 21, 2009 at 8:53 pm

    On Tue, Jul 21, 2009 at 4:23 PM, Bowie Baileywrote:
    Since we don't have any pressing need for a high-precision time source,
    we just sync our main server to the public ntp.org pool and then have
    everything else in the building sync to the main server.
    We do have a pressing need for high-precision time which is why I run
    a strat 1 time service in-house. I use other public strat 1 servers
    as backup only.


    --
    Andy Harrison
    public key: 0x67518262
  • Nate Amsden at Jul 21, 2009 at 9:16 pm

    Andy Harrison wrote:
    Currently, my time server is a Sun v240 with a 32-pci gps card (with a
    proprietary Solaris driver) attached to our gps receiver via an sma
    cable up to the roof of my building. As I'm migrating almost all of
    our Solaris servers and services over to CentOS, I'd like to know what
    other people are using for time server hardware. Any suggestions?
    Not knowing what country your from but at a U.S. taxpayer I have
    no reservations about using time.nist.gov myself, some people
    think it's rude to directly query stratum 1 servers.

    I typically have 2-3 NTP servers per location behind a load balancer
    and my internal servers sync against the load balanced VIP, and the
    NTP servers themselves sync against time.nist.gov

    nate
  • Andy Harrison at Jul 21, 2009 at 9:42 pm
    On Tue, Jul 21, 2009 at 5:16 PM, natewrote:
    Not knowing what country your from but at a U.S. taxpayer I have
    no reservations about using time.nist.gov myself, some people
    think it's rude to directly query stratum 1 servers.
    My server already is a stratum 1 time server. I use other external
    strat 1 servers only as a backup. I was curious what hardware others
    are running to have their own internal strat 1 servers.


    --
    Andy Harrison
    public key: 0x67518262
  • Scott McClanahan at Jul 22, 2009 at 1:17 pm
    Not knowing what country your from but at a U.S. taxpayer I have no
    reservations about using time.nist.gov myself, some people think it's
    rude to directly query stratum 1 servers.

    I typically have 2-3 NTP servers per location behind a load balancer and
    my internal servers sync against the load balanced VIP, and the NTP
    servers themselves sync against time.nist.gov

    nate



    I'm not trying to hijack this thread but I have a question about how
    typical this is for *core* infrastructure services. Do you load balance
    other services as well? I'm thinking of dns, ldap, proxy, internal web
    servers like a cms, radius, and probably more but those are some of the
    services I try to make fault tolerant. Thanks.
  • Scott Silva at Jul 21, 2009 at 10:22 pm

    on 7-21-2009 12:29 PM Andy Harrison spake the following:
    Currently, my time server is a Sun v240 with a 32-pci gps card (with a
    proprietary Solaris driver) attached to our gps receiver via an sma
    cable up to the roof of my building. As I'm migrating almost all of
    our Solaris servers and services over to CentOS, I'd like to know what
    other people are using for time server hardware. Any suggestions?
    If there are other interfaces available, FreeBSD does well as a timeserver
    with SOME GPS receivers. But if it is working OK, I would just leave it
    running unless the hardware is going south.

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  • Andy Harrison at Jul 21, 2009 at 10:36 pm

    On Tue, Jul 21, 2009 at 6:22 PM, Scott Silvawrote:
    If there are other interfaces available, FreeBSD does well as a timeserver
    with SOME GPS receivers. But if it is working OK, I would just leave it
    running unless the hardware is going south.
    It's not so much that the hardware is currently going south, it's just
    Sun being Sun. When a box gets this old, they start charging ungodly
    amounts for support costs.


    --
    Andy Harrison
    public key: 0x67518262
  • Ron Loftin at Jul 21, 2009 at 10:40 pm

    On Tue, 2009-07-21 at 18:36 -0400, Andy Harrison wrote:
    On Tue, Jul 21, 2009 at 6:22 PM, Scott Silvawrote:
    If there are other interfaces available, FreeBSD does well as a timeserver
    with SOME GPS receivers. But if it is working OK, I would just leave it
    running unless the hardware is going south.
    It's not so much that the hardware is currently going south, it's just
    Sun being Sun. When a box gets this old, they start charging ungodly
    amounts for support costs.
    That's what eBay is for. ;^P

    >
    --
    Ron Loftin reloftin at twcny.rr.com

    "God, root, what is difference ?" Piter from UserFriendly
  • Alberto García Gómez at Jul 23, 2009 at 2:01 pm
    Dear Fellows:

    I don't know if this is the right way to make this question but I have not
    an idea of how do that so here goes:

    I want to update some packages of my CentOS (eg.: Apache, PHP, etc.); when I
    tried downloading the packages and requesting for it dependencies I need go
    online again and download then, and again, and again....very tired.

    So I need a way to set a repo (I can make the REPO in one of my local
    servers) and once a request an update this come with dependences
    satisficied.

    I'm not talking of make a "yum -y update"; is more liked an intelligent
    "rpm" with REPO connection. ;-)

    Best Regards

    Saludos Fraternales
    _____________________________
    Atte.
    Alberto Garc?a G?mez M:.M:.
    Administrador de Redes/Webmaster
    IPI "Carlos Marx", Matanzas. Cuba.
    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Ron Loftin" <reloftin at twcny.rr.com>
    To: "CentOS mailing list" <centos at centos.org>
    Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2009 6:40 PM
    Subject: Re: [CentOS] ntp time server

    On Tue, 2009-07-21 at 18:36 -0400, Andy Harrison wrote:
    On Tue, Jul 21, 2009 at 6:22 PM, Scott Silvawrote:
    If there are other interfaces available, FreeBSD does well as a
    timeserver
    with SOME GPS receivers. But if it is working OK, I would just leave it
    running unless the hardware is going south.
    It's not so much that the hardware is currently going south, it's just
    Sun being Sun. When a box gets this old, they start charging ungodly
    amounts for support costs.
    That's what eBay is for. ;^P
    --
    Ron Loftin reloftin at twcny.rr.com

    "God, root, what is difference ?" Piter from UserFriendly

    _______________________________________________
    CentOS mailing list
    CentOS at centos.org
    http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
  • Filipe Brandenburger at Jul 23, 2009 at 3:04 pm
    Hi,

    2009/7/23 Alberto Garc?a G?mez <alberto at ipimtzcm.rimed.cu>:
    I'm not talking of make a "yum -y update"; is more liked an intelligent
    "rpm" with REPO connection. ;-)
    "yum" is "rpm" with repository connection and dependency solving.
    There currently is no way to have RPM download and install
    dependencies by itself, that is what "yum" is for.

    You should look into using "createrepo" to create a "yum" repository.
    It is not that hard.

    Alternatively, you should look into already existing repositories for
    CentOS that contain the versions of Apache and PHP that you want.

    HTH,
    Filipe
  • Alberto García Gómez at Jul 24, 2009 at 3:18 pm
    OK, maybe I don't write the right word, what I really need is an upgrade
    (eg.: from PHP5.1.x to PHP5.2.x, and so on) and I don't know do that using
    yum. What I do until know is downloading the packages from rpmfind.net and
    when they request me some dependencies I download those packages again, and
    again, and again......and that's what I want to avoid

    Saludos Fraternales
    _____________________________
    Atte.
    Alberto Garc?a G?mez M:.M:.
    Administrador de Redes/Webmaster
    IPI "Carlos Marx", Matanzas. Cuba.
    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Filipe Brandenburger" <filbranden at gmail.com>
    To: "CentOS mailing list" <centos at centos.org>
    Sent: Thursday, July 23, 2009 11:04 AM
    Subject: Re: [CentOS] UPDATE over REPO


    Hi,

    2009/7/23 Alberto Garc?a G?mez <alberto at ipimtzcm.rimed.cu>:
    I'm not talking of make a "yum -y update"; is more liked an intelligent
    "rpm" with REPO connection. ;-)
    "yum" is "rpm" with repository connection and dependency solving.
    There currently is no way to have RPM download and install
    dependencies by itself, that is what "yum" is for.

    You should look into using "createrepo" to create a "yum" repository.
    It is not that hard.

    Alternatively, you should look into already existing repositories for
    CentOS that contain the versions of Apache and PHP that you want.

    HTH,
    Filipe
    _______________________________________________
    CentOS mailing list
    CentOS at centos.org
    http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
  • Ralph Angenendt at Jul 24, 2009 at 2:28 pm

    Alberto Garc?a G?mez wrote:
    OK, maybe I don't write the right word, what I really need is an upgrade
    (eg.: from PHP5.1.x to PHP5.2.x, and so on) and I don't know do that using
    yum. What I do until know is downloading the packages from rpmfind.net and
    when they request me some dependencies I download those packages again, and
    again, and again......and that's what I want to avoid
    I wonder why we write all that documentation ...

    <http://wiki.centos.org/AdditionalResources/Repositories>

    Ralph
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  • Kwan Lowe at Jul 24, 2009 at 2:35 pm

    2009/7/24 Alberto Garc?a G?mez <alberto at ipimtzcm.rimed.cu>:
    OK, maybe I don't write the right word, what I really need is an upgrade
    (eg.: from PHP5.1.x to PHP5.2.x, and so on) and I don't know do that using
    yum. What I do until know is downloading the packages from rpmfind.net and
    when they request me some dependencies I download those packages again, and
    again, and again......and that's what I want to avoid
    Not sure if this is precisely what you mean, but I have a similar issue.

    I run some production RedHat servers (4.x) and CentOS for development
    and test instances. The Apache/PHP packages we require are not
    available via repos as they need some specific Oracle, Perl and other
    miscellaneous packages. I need to rebuild the packages because of
    these dependencies.

    To ease the process, I use the Sourcexx: lines in the rpm spec file to
    automatically retrieve sources from their online homes. This works if
    the URLs are relatively consistent. For example:

    Source0: http://www.apache.org/dist/httpd/httpd-%{version}.tar.gz

    You could add another local server containing those packages then use
    the Source line to specify the location of your local server.
  • John R Pierce at Jul 23, 2009 at 3:08 pm

    Alberto Garc?a G?mez wrote:
    I'm not talking of make a "yum -y update"; is more liked an intelligent
    "rpm" with REPO connection. ;-)
    you'll need to explain the differences as from where I'm sitting its
    exactly yum.
  • Lanny Marcus at Jul 23, 2009 at 9:13 pm
    On 7/23/09, Alberto Garc?a G?mez wrote:
    <snip>
    I want to update some packages of my CentOS (eg.: Apache, PHP, etc.); when I
    tried downloading the packages and requesting for it dependencies I need go
    online again and download then, and again, and again....very tired.

    So I need a way to set a repo (I can make the REPO in one of my local
    servers) and once a request an update this come with dependences
    satisficied.

    I'm not talking of make a "yum -y update"; is more liked an intelligent
    "rpm" with REPO connection. ;-)
    Bienvenido Alberto: Your written English is very good. I believe you
    may also find some information in Spanish on the CentOS.org web site
    and a Spanish language mailing list, but the majority of the activity
    is on this mailing list. You may want to add the rpmforge and EPEL
    repositories. Be sure to add the yum-priorities plug in.
    <http://wiki.centos.org/PackageManagement/Yum/Priorities> If you add
    EPEL, I suggest that you give it a very low priority or it will
    replace a *lot* of packages in your CentOS box. Please remember that
    this is an Enterprise distro and if you upgrade core packages and you
    break it, it is your problem to fix...... :-) Saludos desde
    Colombia

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