FAQ
My OQO has a VIA chipset. From the hwconf:

class: VIDEO
bus: PCI
detached: 0
desc: "VIA Technologies, Inc. CX700M2 UniChrome PRO II Graphics"
vendorId: 1106
deviceId: 3157
subVendorId: 1106
subDeviceId: 3157
pciType: 1
pcidom: 0
pcibus: 1
pcidev: 0
pcifn: 0

When I install Centos, I default to the vesa driver, and it operates at
the monitor's native 800x480. Of course I want more and to physically
scroll the screen to see all of the content (the OQO has slide bars on
it that do cause the current active window to scroll).

When I change the monitor settings to Generic LCD 1024x768, I get that
and 800x600 as an option. If I change the screen resolution to either
800x600 or 1024x768, and log out of X and log back in, my resolution is
unchanged at 800x480.

So I tried using the VIA driver that comes with Centos. It does not
list the CX700, but, you know, give it a try.

At first I get errors from X when logging in, finally I get changes to
occur, but I am still at 800x480. Selecting 800x600 or 1024x768 mkaes
no difference. Below is my /etc/X11/xorg.conf. Any ideas on what to try?

# Xorg configuration created by system-config-display

Section "ServerLayout"
Identifier "single head configuration"
Screen 0 "Screen0" 0 0
InputDevice "Keyboard0" "CoreKeyboard"
EndSection

Section "InputDevice"
Identifier "Keyboard0"
Driver "kbd"
Option "XkbModel" "pc105"
Option "XkbLayout" "us"
EndSection

Section "Monitor"
Identifier "Monitor0"
ModelName "LCD Panel 1024x768"
### Comment all HorizSync and VertSync values to use DDC:
HorizSync 31.5 - 48.0
VertRefresh 56.0 - 65.0
Option "dpms"
EndSection

Section "Device"
Identifier "Videocard0"
Driver "vesa"
EndSection

Section "Screen"
Identifier "Screen0"
Device "Videocard0"
Monitor "Monitor0"
DefaultDepth 24
SubSection "Display"
Viewport 0 0
Depth 24
EndSubSection
EndSection

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  • Niki Kovacs at Oct 2, 2008 at 2:56 pm

    Robert Moskowitz a ?crit :
    At first I get errors from X when logging in, finally I get changes to
    occur, but I am still at 800x480. Selecting 800x600 or 1024x768 mkaes
    no difference. Below is my /etc/X11/xorg.conf. Any ideas on what to try?
    Backup your existing configuration.

    As root:

    # X -configure

    # mv /root/xorg.conf.new /etc/X11/xorg.conf

    This will give you a first draft to start from. What you usually have to
    edit by hand:

    1) keyboard layout

    2) DefaultDepth (mostly 24 if you want 16 million colors)

    3) Screen resolution (if you don't want the default, Modes "XxY" will do)

    Check the Driver section if your driver is listed OK instead of "vesa".

    Once this is working, you can fine-tune bits like DRI, Composite, etcetera.

    Cheers,

    Niki Kovacs
  • Robert Moskowitz at Oct 2, 2008 at 3:49 pm

    Niki Kovacs wrote:
    Robert Moskowitz a ?crit :
    At first I get errors from X when logging in, finally I get changes
    to occur, but I am still at 800x480. Selecting 800x600 or 1024x768
    mkaes no difference. Below is my /etc/X11/xorg.conf. Any ideas on
    what to try?
    Backup your existing configuration.

    As root:

    # X -configure
    Fatal server error:
    Server is already active for display 0
    If this server is no longer running, remove /tmp/.X0-lock
    and start again.
    # mv /root/xorg.conf.new /etc/X11/xorg.conf

    This will give you a first draft to start from. What you usually have
    to edit by hand:

    1) keyboard layout

    2) DefaultDepth (mostly 24 if you want 16 million colors)

    3) Screen resolution (if you don't want the default, Modes "XxY" will do)

    Check the Driver section if your driver is listed OK instead of "vesa".

    Once this is working, you can fine-tune bits like DRI, Composite,
    etcetera.
  • Niki Kovacs at Oct 2, 2008 at 3:54 pm

    Robert Moskowitz a ?crit :
    Fatal server error:
    Server is already active for display 0
    If this server is no longer running, remove /tmp/.X0-lock
    and start again.
    Of course you will have to do this with X not running. Two solutions.
    Either edit /etc/inittab, like this:

    # Default runlevel. The runlevels used by RHS are:
    # 0 - halt (Do NOT set initdefault to this)
    # 1 - Single user mode
    # 2 - Multiuser, without NFS (The same as 3, if you do not have
    networking)
    # 3 - Full multiuser mode
    # 4 - unused
    # 5 - X11
    # 6 - reboot (Do NOT set initdefault to this)
    #
    id:3:initdefault:

    ... and then reboot.

    Or, as root in a graphical terminal:

    # init 3

    And then login as root.

    Cheers,

    Niki
  • Robert Moskowitz at Oct 2, 2008 at 5:09 pm

    Niki Kovacs wrote:
    Robert Moskowitz a ?crit :
    Fatal server error:
    Server is already active for display 0
    If this server is no longer running, remove /tmp/.X0-lock
    and start again.
    Of course you will have to do this with X not running. Two solutions.
    Either edit /etc/inittab,
    Thought I would have to do that....

    So I did and it made a HUGH xorg.conf.new file. With instructions to
    try it out by:

    X -config /root/xorg.conf.new

    Well that brought up X but no window open and left or right mouse did
    nothing. So back to <cntl-alt-F1> and I see messages about VNC mode (I
    have vncserver configured but not running), so it ws trying to do
    something to accomidate vncserver if I should start it up?

    And there are sections in the new xorg.conf that are not in the
    current. Like one for the mouse, a files section and the like, so I
    figured i would cut and paste, but first....

    I have another OQO with Centos installed that has the 'default' X setup
    with no playing around with the Display manager, I figured I would look
    at its xorg.conf to get back to basics. Guess what, NO
    /etc/X11/xorg.conf and everything works fine with the unit's 800x480
    display. I did a 'updatedb' then a 'locate xorg.conf' and all I found
    was a man page file. So how do it know what to do for the display in
    default????
  • Niki Kovacs at Oct 2, 2008 at 6:03 pm

    Robert Moskowitz a ?crit :
    So I did and it made a HUGH xorg.conf.new file. With instructions to
    try it out by:

    X -config /root/xorg.conf.new

    Well that brought up X but no window open and left or right mouse did
    nothing. So back to <cntl-alt-F1> and I see messages about VNC mode (I
    have vncserver configured but not running), so it ws trying to do
    something to accomidate vncserver if I should start it up?

    And there are sections in the new xorg.conf that are not in the
    current. Like one for the mouse, a files section and the like, so I
    figured i would cut and paste, but first....
    Of course it helps to read the relevant documentation :o)

    I just indicated this method which I've been using for all the years on
    Linux. I began on Slackware, where there is (almost) no configuration
    helper, so you have to read the docs. There's no way around it. And when
    I switched to other distros (like CentOS), I simply kept the habit of
    configuring things by hand.

    IIRC, I spent much time with the FreeBSD documentation about the
    graphical server. It's really well done, explaining everything step by
    step. But then, it's not something you can learn quickly in a matter of
    minutes. It takes some time, but it's worth it.

    Have fun,

    Niki
  • William L. Maltby at Oct 2, 2008 at 5:26 pm

    On Thu, 2008-10-02 at 10:44 -0400, Robert Moskowitz wrote:
    <snip>
    # Xorg configuration created by system-config-display
    <snip>
    Section "Monitor"
    Identifier "Monitor0"
    ModelName "LCD Panel 1024x768"
    ### Comment all HorizSync and VertSync values to use DDC:
    HorizSync 31.5 - 48.0
    VertRefresh 56.0 - 65.0
    Option "dpms"
    EndSection
    You may not need the monitor section. If anything like DDC (I think
    that's what it's acronym is - Display Data Control?) is in operation, it
    will piuck up the proper rates automatically. I don't have a monitor
    section at all in my xorg.conf. But I'm running a normal "desktop" node
    with conventional monitor.

    Regardless, even if needed, try what I show below.
    Section "Device"
    Identifier "Videocard0"
    Driver "vesa"
    EndSection

    Section "Screen"
    Identifier "Screen0"
    Device "Videocard0"
    Monitor "Monitor0"
    DefaultDepth 24
    SubSection "Display"
    Viewport 0 0
    Depth 24
    EndSubSection
    EndSection
    My "Screen" section looks like this. Watch out for the line wrap on
    "Modes".

    Section "Screen"
    Identifier "Screen0"
    Device "Videocard0"
    DefaultDepth 24
    SubSection "Display"
    Viewport 0 0
    Depth 24
    Modes "1600x1200" "1280x1024" "1024x768" "800x600"
    "640x480" "1280x960" "1280x800" "1152x864" "1152x768"
    EndSubSection
    EndSection
    <snip>
    HTH
    --
    Bill
  • Robert Moskowitz at Oct 8, 2008 at 8:21 pm
    I am having serious difficulties with video control on this box....
    See below.

    William L. Maltby wrote:
    On Thu, 2008-10-02 at 10:44 -0400, Robert Moskowitz wrote:

    # Xorg configuration created by system-config-display
    <snip>
    Section "Monitor"
    Identifier "Monitor0"
    ModelName "LCD Panel 1024x768"
    ### Comment all HorizSync and VertSync values to use DDC:
    HorizSync 31.5 - 48.0
    VertRefresh 56.0 - 65.0
    Option "dpms"
    EndSection
    You may not need the monitor section. If anything like DDC (I think
    that's what it's acronym is - Display Data Control?) is in operation, it
    will piuck up the proper rates automatically. I don't have a monitor
    section at all in my xorg.conf. But I'm running a normal "desktop" node
    with conventional monitor.

    Regardless, even if needed, try what I show below.

    Section "Device"
    Identifier "Videocard0"
    Driver "vesa"
    EndSection

    Section "Screen"
    Identifier "Screen0"
    Device "Videocard0"
    Monitor "Monitor0"
    DefaultDepth 24
    SubSection "Display"
    Viewport 0 0
    Depth 24
    EndSubSection
    EndSection
    My "Screen" section looks like this. Watch out for the line wrap on
    "Modes".

    Section "Screen"
    Identifier "Screen0"
    Device "Videocard0"
    DefaultDepth 24
    SubSection "Display"
    Viewport 0 0
    Depth 24
    Modes "1600x1200" "1280x1024" "1024x768" "800x600"
    "640x480" "1280x960" "1280x800" "1152x864" "1152x768"
    EndSubSection
    EndSection
    Something is really not working....

    I have changed inittab to: id:3:initdefault:

    I am logged in as root, and run: system-config-display --reconfig

    I go into the Hardware tab. There I see it lists my video card; when I
    go into configure the video card, it shows VESA (my video card is not a
    listed card). For the monitor type, I select LCD Monitor 1280x1024.
    Back to the Settings tab, I select 1024x768. I click on OK to save all
    this, and system-config-display ends.

    I then run: init 5

    It comes up in 640x480 mode (according to Preferences>Screen
    Resolution), and no other mode is listed.

    I go to Administration>Display, where it lists the current mode as
    640x480, I select 1024x768 and click on OK (can barely see the OK
    button). I open a terminal window and run init 3 to get me out of X. I
    run init 5 again. The login screen is at a higher resolution than
    before, but once I log in as root, it is back to 640x480!

    The display subsection in /etc/X11/xorg.conf lists only the modes:
    "1024x768" "800x600" "600x480".

    In the standard XP that comes with the units, the default resolution is
    800x480 and you can increase that and use the capacitor scroll bars to
    scroll the screen.

    help....
  • Mark Hull-Richter at Oct 8, 2008 at 8:36 pm

    On Wed, Oct 8, 2008 at 1:22 PM, Robert Moskowitz wrote:
    I have changed inittab to: id:3:initdefault:

    I am logged in as root, and run: system-config-display --reconfig

    I go into the Hardware tab. There I see it lists my video card; when I go
    into configure the video card, it shows VESA (my video card is not a listed
    card). For the monitor type, I select LCD Monitor 1280x1024. Back to the
    Settings tab, I select 1024x768. I click on OK to save all this, and
    system-config-display ends.
    First thought: Can you get a video driver for Linux from the
    manufacturer of your card? nVidia has them, so perhaps the others do
    if yours is not nVidia.

    Second, double check on the back of your monitor (or its manual) that
    your horizontal and vertical refresh frequencies in the xorg.conf are
    within tolerances and change them if not.

    Third, are you sure your video card is VESA compatible? (That one
    just flashed through my head - wag.)
    I then run: init 5

    It comes up in 640x480 mode (according to Preferences>Screen Resolution),
    and no other mode is listed.

    I go to Administration>Display, where it lists the current mode as 640x480,
    I select 1024x768 and click on OK (can barely see the OK button). I open a
    terminal window and run init 3 to get me out of X. I run init 5 again. The
    login screen is at a higher resolution than before, but once I log in as
    root, it is back to 640x480!
    To get out of X, just log out or type <ctrl><alt><backspace> (this
    works in gnome, I'm guessing it also works in kde).

    Also, you could try to reset the preference to 1026x768 before restarting X.
    The display subsection in /etc/X11/xorg.conf lists only the modes:
    "1024x768" "800x600" "600x480".
    You can edit this to be anything you like, including the 800x480 or
    other w/s modes. Restart X and they should take effect.

    HTH.

    mhr
  • Robert Moskowitz at Oct 8, 2008 at 8:54 pm

    MHR wrote:
    On Wed, Oct 8, 2008 at 1:22 PM, Robert Moskowitz wrote:

    I have changed inittab to: id:3:initdefault:

    I am logged in as root, and run: system-config-display --reconfig

    I go into the Hardware tab. There I see it lists my video card; when I go
    into configure the video card, it shows VESA (my video card is not a listed
    card). For the monitor type, I select LCD Monitor 1280x1024. Back to the
    Settings tab, I select 1024x768. I click on OK to save all this, and
    system-config-display ends.
    First thought: Can you get a video driver for Linux from the
    manufacturer of your card? nVidia has them, so perhaps the others do
    if yours is not nVidia.
    It is "VIA Technologies, Inc. CX700M2 UniChrome PRO II Graphics".

    OQO does not have drivers, I guess I need to check out VIA (Yom Kippur
    starts in a couple hours, so this will be done on friday).

    Second, double check on the back of your monitor (or its manual) that
    your horizontal and vertical refresh frequencies in the xorg.conf are
    within tolerances and change them if not.
    OK. DOn't know what the internal display is, will have to ask OQO, Will
    have to look at my external monitor (connected via a Belkin KVM).
    Third, are you sure your video card is VESA compatible? (That one
    just flashed through my head - wag.)
    Yes. that is what other LInux distro users use. I have seen messages
    about using xvesa driver so you can use the key to turn the monitor
    90degrees. But I can't find anything about an xvesa driver for Centos.
    I then run: init 5

    It comes up in 640x480 mode (according to Preferences>Screen Resolution),
    and no other mode is listed.

    I go to Administration>Display, where it lists the current mode as 640x480,
    I select 1024x768 and click on OK (can barely see the OK button). I open a
    terminal window and run init 3 to get me out of X. I run init 5 again. The
    login screen is at a higher resolution than before, but once I log in as
    root, it is back to 640x480!
    To get out of X, just log out or type <ctrl><alt><backspace> (this
    works in gnome, I'm guessing it also works in kde).

    Also, you could try to reset the preference to 1026x768 before restarting X.
    Where?
    The display subsection in /etc/X11/xorg.conf lists only the modes:
    "1024x768" "800x600" "600x480".
    You can edit this to be anything you like, including the 800x480 or
    other w/s modes. Restart X and they should take effect.
    How to restart X other than init 5?


    thanks.
  • Mark Hull-Richter at Oct 8, 2008 at 9:01 pm

    On Wed, Oct 8, 2008 at 1:55 PM, Robert Moskowitz wrote:
    It is "VIA Technologies, Inc. CX700M2 UniChrome PRO II Graphics".

    OQO does not have drivers, I guess I need to check out VIA (Yom Kippur
    starts in a couple hours, so this will be done on friday).
    Most likely.
    OK. DOn't know what the internal display is, will have to ask OQO, Will have
    to look at my external monitor (connected via a Belkin KVM).
    Should be in the manual, if you have it. Otherwise, you'd have to
    check with the manufacturer.
    To get out of X, just log out or type <ctrl><alt><backspace> (this <<<<<<<<<<<<<<
    works in gnome, I'm guessing it also works in kde). <<<<<<<<<<<<<<

    Also, you could try to reset the preference to 1026x768 before restarting
    X.
    Where?
    Preferences (System->Preferences->Screen Resolution), although now
    that I think about it, the display has to come up properly first....
    You can edit this to be anything you like, including the 800x480 or
    other w/s modes. Restart X and they should take effect.
    How to restart X other than init 5?
    See above where I "highlighted" on the right.

    Good luck, and good yom tov.

    mhr
  • John R Pierce at Oct 8, 2008 at 9:10 pm

    Robert Moskowitz wrote:
    It is "VIA Technologies, Inc. CX700M2 UniChrome PRO II Graphics".

    OQO does not have drivers, I guess I need to check out VIA
    condolences and good luck. VIA graphics chips are abysmal, and their
    support is even worse. its whats left of the old S3, bought at a
    garage sale prices when S3 merged with Diamond to form Rio and sell MP3
    players.
  • William L. Maltby at Oct 8, 2008 at 10:23 pm

    On Wed, 2008-10-08 at 16:22 -0400, Robert Moskowitz wrote:
    <snip>
    Section "Monitor"
    Identifier "Monitor0"
    ModelName "LCD Panel 1024x768"
    ### Comment all HorizSync and VertSync values to use DDC:
    HorizSync 31.5 - 48.0
    VertRefresh 56.0 - 65.0
    Option "dpms"
    EndSection
    I would try eliminating the sync/refresh/dpms as a starting point to
    just see if things will work at a basic level.
    <snip>
    Regardless, even if needed, try what I show below.
    <snip>
    My "Screen" section looks like this. Watch out for the line wrap on
    "Modes".

    Section "Screen"
    Identifier "Screen0"
    Device "Videocard0"
    DefaultDepth 24
    SubSection "Display"
    Viewport 0 0
    Depth 24
    Modes "1600x1200" "1280x1024" "1024x768" "800x600"
    "640x480" "1280x960" "1280x800" "1152x864" "1152x768"
    EndSubSection
    EndSection
    Something is really not working....

    I have changed inittab to: id:3:initdefault:

    I am logged in as root, and run: system-config-display --reconfig

    I go into the Hardware tab. There I see it lists my video card; when I
    go into configure the video card, it shows VESA (my video card is not a
    listed card). For the monitor type, I select LCD Monitor 1280x1024.
    Back to the Settings tab, I select 1024x768. I click on OK to save all
    this, and system-config-display ends.
    I've not used the GUI setup stuff, so I have no thoughts on it. When you
    get done futzing around with that, does your xorg.conf have multiple
    resolutions in it?
    I then run: init 5

    It comes up in 640x480 mode (according to Preferences>Screen
    Resolution), and no other mode is listed.
    Again, GUI me no help to you. You might want to try manually editing the
    xorg.conf to look similar to what I showed as a starting point. Get rid
    of the sync lines in the monitor section and see if it still works at a
    basic level, at least.
    I go to Administration>Display, where it lists the current mode as
    640x480, I select 1024x768 and click on OK (can barely see the OK
    button). I open a terminal window and run init 3 to get me out of X. I
    run init 5 again. The login screen is at a higher resolution than
    before, but once I log in as root, it is back to 640x480!

    The display subsection in /etc/X11/xorg.conf lists only the modes:
    "1024x768" "800x600" "600x480".
    OK. Now if you hit <CTL><ALT><NUM+ or NUM-> does it change resolutions?
    In the standard XP that comes with the units, the default resolution is
    800x480 and you can increase that and use the capacitor scroll bars to
    scroll the screen.

    help....
    I really know only a little about this stuff. My normal procedure is to
    *manually* set stuff up (after running the normal kudzu/system-config*
    stuff) to get what I want installed.

    For me, debugging is much easier when the details are not hidden. So
    manually setting things up, and changing them, helps provide
    transparency.
    <snip sig stuff>
    ISTR that there are some config files under $HOME that have settings
    that are used when X is started up (but last time I looked, it was
    X11R6). Maybe there is something under some of those dirs?

    Sorry I can't help more.

    --
    Bill
  • John at Oct 9, 2008 at 11:43 am
    JohnStanley Writes:

    Didn't you say in another thread you had another OQO just like the one with
    the video problems? If so try to copy the xorg.config file from the working
    one to the one with the problems. Reboot after copying. Do lspci -v to make
    sure both cards are of the same chipset family.
  • Robert Moskowitz at Oct 10, 2008 at 1:03 pm

    John wrote:
    JohnStanley Writes:

    Didn't you say in another thread you had another OQO just like the one with
    the video problems? If so try to copy the xorg.config file from the working
    one to the one with the problems. Reboot after copying. Do lspci -v to make
    sure both cards are of the same chipset family.
    I have 4 OQOs for my test bed. Centos on 2 so far. One is working with
    HIP already, the other I am working on improving how it is to use Centos
    with. One is still running default XP, so I have a 'baseline'. The other
    still in the box.

    Neither Centos build has video working beyond 640x480 (or 800x480,
    whatever it is). Want 1024x768 working.

    Fixing the video is important. When I am testing HIP, I can't be remote
    consoleing in (where I get the resolution of the remote I am running
    vncviewer on), because: I am testing with IPv6 only (and vnc is broken
    with IPv6) and I do not want 'spurious" connections dirtying up my
    tcpdumps. So the systems are connected to my KVM.
  • Mark Hull-Richter at Oct 2, 2008 at 5:43 pm

    On Thu, Oct 2, 2008 at 7:44 AM, Robert Moskowitz wrote:
    When I install Centos, I default to the vesa driver, and it operates at the
    monitor's native 800x480. Of course I want more and to physically scroll
    the screen to see all of the content (the OQO has slide bars on it that do
    cause the current active window to scroll).

    When I change the monitor settings to Generic LCD 1024x768, I get that and
    800x600 as an option. If I change the screen resolution to either 800x600
    or 1024x768, and log out of X and log back in, my resolution is unchanged at
    800x480.
    I can't help wondering why you'd want a 4x3 aspect ratio on a screen
    that has a (roughly) 16x10 widescreen aspect ratio, but that's your
    baby.

    After you set the monitor type and display in
    System->Administration->Display, do you also go to
    System->Preferences->Screen Resolution to set that? I had a similar
    problem with my 16x10 monitor until I changed both.

    HTH

    mhr

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