FAQ
At boot time, the system is looking for a resume signature on the
default SWAP partition that was defined during the OS installation.

On several systems, I changed the location of the SWAP partition. How do
I change the location where the system looks at boot time for the resume
signature?

Thanks,
--
Patrice Guay
patrice.guay@nanotechnologies.qc.ca

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  • Mag Gam at Sep 1, 2008 at 5:23 pm
    Why not create a new swap partition and place it in /etc/fstab ?
    You don't have to worry about swap signatures and all...




    On Sat, Aug 30, 2008 at 8:05 AM, Patrice Guay
    wrote:
    At boot time, the system is looking for a resume signature on the
    default SWAP partition that was defined during the OS installation.

    On several systems, I changed the location of the SWAP partition. How do
    I change the location where the system looks at boot time for the resume
    signature?

    Thanks,
    --
    Patrice Guay
    patrice.guay@nanotechnologies.qc.ca
    _______________________________________________
    CentOS mailing list
    CentOS@centos.org
    http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
  • Mag Gam at Sep 1, 2008 at 5:25 pm
    1. Format the swap partition again: sudo mkswap /dev/XXX
    2. Activate swap partition sudo swapon /dev/XXX
    3. Replace UUID=XXX in /etc/initramfs-tools/conf.d/resume by "resume=/dev/XXX"
    4. Regenerate the initrd: sudo mkinitramfs -o /boot/initrd.img-2.6.XX
    (same version as the kernel)


    On Mon, Sep 1, 2008 at 1:23 PM, Mag Gam wrote:
    Why not create a new swap partition and place it in /etc/fstab ?
    You don't have to worry about swap signatures and all...




    On Sat, Aug 30, 2008 at 8:05 AM, Patrice Guay
    wrote:
    At boot time, the system is looking for a resume signature on the
    default SWAP partition that was defined during the OS installation.

    On several systems, I changed the location of the SWAP partition. How do
    I change the location where the system looks at boot time for the resume
    signature?

    Thanks,
    --
    Patrice Guay
    patrice.guay@nanotechnologies.qc.ca
    _______________________________________________
    CentOS mailing list
    CentOS@centos.org
    http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
  • Patrice Guay at Sep 1, 2008 at 6:42 pm

    On Sat, Aug 30, 2008 at 8:05 AM, Patrice Guay
    wrote:
    At boot time, the system is looking for a resume signature on the
    default SWAP partition that was defined during the OS installation.

    On several systems, I changed the location of the SWAP partition. How do
    I change the location where the system looks at boot time for the resume
    signature?
    1. Format the swap partition again: sudo mkswap /dev/XXX
    2. Activate swap partition sudo swapon /dev/XXX
    3. Replace UUID=XXX in /etc/initramfs-tools/conf.d/resume by
    "resume=/dev/XXX"
    4. Regenerate the initrd: sudo mkinitramfs -o /boot/initrd.img-2.6.XX
    (same version as the kernel)
    I cannot find the /etc/initramfs-tools directory on my system. Which
    package provides it under CentOS 5?

    Thanks,
    --
    Patrice
  • Mag Gam at Sep 1, 2008 at 8:31 pm

    On Mon, Sep 1, 2008 at 2:42 PM, Patrice Guay wrote:
    On Sat, Aug 30, 2008 at 8:05 AM, Patrice Guay
    wrote:
    At boot time, the system is looking for a resume signature on the
    default SWAP partition that was defined during the OS installation.

    On several systems, I changed the location of the SWAP partition. How do
    I change the location where the system looks at boot time for the resume
    signature?
    1. Format the swap partition again: sudo mkswap /dev/XXX
    2. Activate swap partition sudo swapon /dev/XXX
    3. Replace UUID=XXX in /etc/initramfs-tools/conf.d/resume by
    "resume=/dev/XXX"
    4. Regenerate the initrd: sudo mkinitramfs -o /boot/initrd.img-2.6.XX
    (same version as the kernel)
    I cannot find the /etc/initramfs-tools directory on my system. Which
    package provides it under CentOS 5?

    Thanks,
    --
    Patrice
    _______________________________________________
    CentOS mailing list
    CentOS@centos.org
    http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
    This is a Debian specific command. I am certain something like this
    exists for CentOS too...
  • Patrice Guay at Sep 2, 2008 at 1:47 am

    Mag Gam wrote:
    On Mon, Sep 1, 2008 at 2:42 PM, Patrice Guay wrote:
    On Sat, Aug 30, 2008 at 8:05 AM, Patrice Guay wrote:
    At boot time, the system is looking for a resume signature on the
    default SWAP partition that was defined during the OS installation.

    On several systems, I changed the location of the SWAP partition. How do
    I change the location where the system looks at boot time for the resume
    signature?
    1. Format the swap partition again: sudo mkswap /dev/XXX
    2. Activate swap partition sudo swapon /dev/XXX
    3. Replace UUID=XXX in /etc/initramfs-tools/conf.d/resume by
    "resume=/dev/XXX"
    4. Regenerate the initrd: sudo mkinitramfs -o /boot/initrd.img-2.6.XX
    (same version as the kernel)
    I cannot find the /etc/initramfs-tools directory on my system. Which
    package provides it under CentOS 5?
    This is a Debian specific command. I am certain something like this
    exists for CentOS too...
    Please, do not provide an answer if it is not directly relevant for
    CentOS. I found a similar receipe than yours after searching Google but
    I am still unable to find an answer for my CentOS 5 systems.

    Regards,
    --
    Patrice
  • Karanbir Singh at Sep 2, 2008 at 10:18 am

    Patrice Guay wrote:
    I cannot find the /etc/initramfs-tools directory on my system. Which
    package provides it under CentOS 5?
    isnt that just mkinitrd on CentOS ?


    --
    Karanbir Singh : http://www.karan.org/ : 2522219@icq
  • Ian Forde at Sep 2, 2008 at 3:06 am

    On Mon, 2008-09-01 at 13:25 -0400, Mag Gam wrote:
    1. Format the swap partition again: sudo mkswap /dev/XXX
    2. Activate swap partition sudo swapon /dev/XXX
    3. Replace UUID=XXX in /etc/initramfs-tools/conf.d/resume by "resume=/dev/XXX"
    4. Regenerate the initrd: sudo mkinitramfs -o /boot/initrd.img-2.6.XX
    (same version as the kernel)
    Hmm... for CentOS this would be:

    Become root (or use sudo - your choice...)
    1. 'mkswap /dev/xxx'
    2. Put the entry into /etc/fstab
    3. 'swapon -a' (This will ensure that your fstab entry is good. If it
    doesn't load up, something's wrong...)
    4. Recreate your initial ramdisk. You could do something like:
    'mkinitrd /boot/initrd-2.6.18-92.1.10.el5.img 2.6.18-92.1.10.el5' but
    I'd recommend creating a new ramdisk (different filename) and creating a
    new test grub entry...

    -I
  • Patrice Guay at Sep 3, 2008 at 9:47 pm

    Ian Forde wrote:
    Patrice Guay wrote:
    At boot time, the system is looking for a resume signature on the
    default SWAP partition that was defined during the OS installation.

    On several systems, I changed the location of the SWAP partition. How do
    I change the location where the system looks at boot time for the resume
    signature?
    Become root (or use sudo - your choice...)
    1. 'mkswap /dev/xxx'
    2. Put the entry into /etc/fstab
    3. 'swapon -a' (This will ensure that your fstab entry is good. If it
    doesn't load up, something's wrong...)
    4. Recreate your initial ramdisk. You could do something like:
    'mkinitrd /boot/initrd-2.6.18-92.1.10.el5.img 2.6.18-92.1.10.el5' but
    I'd recommend creating a new ramdisk (different filename) and creating a
    new test grub entry...
    Updating the kernel also recreates the initial ramdisk. So, step #4
    could be avoided if you plan to update the kernel on your system.

    Thanks for the help,
    --
    Patrice

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