FAQ
I wrote in a thread entitled "ip_conntrack_ftp fails to load on
CentOS4.3" that I had what I considered to be a borked upgrade, using
yum update. When I went from 4.2 -> 4.3 I ceased to be able to use the
ip_conntrack_ftp module, thus cutting off my users from ftp access.

What I'd like to do is get yum to rerun its update procedure, which
should allow any post processing that failed to complete properly to do
so. I'm hoping that will add whatever missing piece is causing me the
grief.

What I haven't found in my reading is any way to get this to occur. Yum
insists that nothing needs to be updated, and the logs seem to show it.
Yet here I am with the one server that actually needs to have ftp
access, without it. Things were working fine until the fateful yum
update run.

I've considered using rpm -F to refresh the files, but from what I can
see that won't work. The switch only causes existing packages to be
updated. I just don't see any switches in rpm or yum that will enable
me to do what I want to attempt. Does anyone know of a wait to cajole
yum to do my bidding?

Thanks!

Barry

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  • Adam Gibson at May 2, 2006 at 8:04 pm

    Barry L. Kline wrote:
    I wrote in a thread entitled "ip_conntrack_ftp fails to load on
    CentOS4.3" that I had what I considered to be a borked upgrade, using
    yum update. When I went from 4.2 -> 4.3 I ceased to be able to use the
    ip_conntrack_ftp module, thus cutting off my users from ftp access.

    What I'd like to do is get yum to rerun its update procedure, which
    should allow any post processing that failed to complete properly to do
    so. I'm hoping that will add whatever missing piece is causing me the
    grief.
    I haven't found anything to do that.

    This wont help you now but I ran across this problem a few times over
    the years with Fedora, RedHat, and the latest time on CentOS installing
    a fresh copy of 4.2 and then just doing an update a few months ago.

    My solution was to create a script that did a 'yum check-update', parse
    the output, and then automatically do a yum update for each package one
    by one that was listed. This made sure that if an update failed after
    installing but before the cleanup stage it would only affect the one
    package that was being updated(and its dependencies of course). Doing
    things one by one like this I have never experienced the fail before
    cleanup problem again though.

    The script is not very advanced so it would try to update packages that
    might have already been updated by dependencies earlier during the
    script run-time but it just ignores any responses that said a package
    was already installed(or nothing to do). I had to run it 2 or 3 times
    for it to upgrade all the packages but eventually there were no more
    packages to update and I did not experience any problems. This was
    after repeating the failure after 2 formats.

    I wish yum had an option to do this. I would call it
    --cleanup-after-each-package :).

    Any time I do a update that will pull in a bunch of packages(like an
    upgrade) I use the script.
  • William L. Maltby at May 2, 2006 at 8:29 pm

    On Tue, 2006-05-02 at 16:04 -0400, Adam Gibson wrote:
    Barry L. Kline wrote:
    I wrote in a thread entitled "ip_conntrack_ftp fails to load on
    CentOS4.3" that I had what I considered to be a borked upgrade, using
    yum update. When I went from 4.2 -> 4.3 I ceased to be able to use the
    ip_conntrack_ftp module, thus cutting off my users from ftp access.

    What I'd like to do is get yum to rerun its update procedure, which
    should allow any post processing that failed to complete properly to do
    so. I'm hoping that will add whatever missing piece is causing me the
    grief.
    I haven't found anything to do that.
    <snip just in time to be too late to be to be of help! ;-)) >
    I'm a rank amateur at this yum/rpm stuff, but maybe ignorant Qs will
    spark a thought? IIRC, rpm has a status check thingy that will check for
    missing files, wrong permits, etc. If the yum update really borked and
    got something into the rpm database as installed completed and that is
    erroneous, can't you ID the borked components with rpm and then do an
    install with force of the identified components?

    Although I love fully automated everything (NOT!) I never leave myself
    in a state where only they can do what I want. But I'm a really old CLI
    guy that has total mistrust of the Graphical Useless Interface.

    HTH
    --
    Bill
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  • Barry L. Kline at May 2, 2006 at 8:59 pm

    William L. Maltby wrote:

    I'm a rank amateur at this yum/rpm stuff, but maybe ignorant Qs will
    spark a thought? IIRC, rpm has a status check thingy that will check for
    missing files, wrong permits, etc. If the yum update really borked and
    got something into the rpm database as installed completed and that is
    erroneous, can't you ID the borked components with rpm and then do an
    install with force of the identified components?
    I have already run that option: rpm -Va. There is nothing in the
    output that points to my problem. That said, I don't think that rpm -Va
    would point out any flaws in my installation if the flaws were such that
    they were the result of the lack of a cleanup script. For example, is a
    cleanup script creates file X (perhaps a bogus example...) and X was not
    part of the RPM package list, would rpm -Va be smart enough to note the
    lack of X? I'm guessing that it wouldn't.

    Thanks for the suggestion, though.

    Barry
  • Adam Gibson at May 3, 2006 at 3:29 pm

    William L. Maltby wrote:
    On Tue, 2006-05-02 at 16:04 -0400, Adam Gibson wrote:
    Barry L. Kline wrote:
    I wrote in a thread entitled "ip_conntrack_ftp fails to load on
    CentOS4.3" that I had what I considered to be a borked upgrade, using
    yum update. When I went from 4.2 -> 4.3 I ceased to be able to use the
    ip_conntrack_ftp module, thus cutting off my users from ftp access.

    What I'd like to do is get yum to rerun its update procedure, which
    should allow any post processing that failed to complete properly to do
    so. I'm hoping that will add whatever missing piece is causing me the
    grief.
    I haven't found anything to do that.
    <snip just in time to be too late to be to be of help! ;-)) >
    I'm a rank amateur at this yum/rpm stuff, but maybe ignorant Qs will
    spark a thought? IIRC, rpm has a status check thingy that will check for
    missing files, wrong permits, etc. If the yum update really borked and
    got something into the rpm database as installed completed and that is
    erroneous, can't you ID the borked components with rpm and then do an
    install with force of the identified components?

    Although I love fully automated everything (NOT!) I never leave myself
    in a state where only they can do what I want. But I'm a really old CLI
    guy that has total mistrust of the Graphical Useless Interface.

    HTH
    Missing files are not really the big problem. Extra files leftover from
    not un-installing the old packages and some number of new packages that
    did not get the post-install scripts run are the big problems.
  • Scott Silva at May 3, 2006 at 11:19 pm

    Adam Gibson spake the following on 5/3/2006 8:29 AM:
    William L. Maltby wrote:
    On Tue, 2006-05-02 at 16:04 -0400, Adam Gibson wrote:
    Barry L. Kline wrote:
    I wrote in a thread entitled "ip_conntrack_ftp fails to load on
    CentOS4.3" that I had what I considered to be a borked upgrade, using
    yum update. When I went from 4.2 -> 4.3 I ceased to be able to use the
    ip_conntrack_ftp module, thus cutting off my users from ftp access.

    What I'd like to do is get yum to rerun its update procedure, which
    should allow any post processing that failed to complete properly to do
    so. I'm hoping that will add whatever missing piece is causing me the
    grief.
    I haven't found anything to do that.
    <snip just in time to be too late to be to be of help! ;-)) >
    I'm a rank amateur at this yum/rpm stuff, but maybe ignorant Qs will
    spark a thought? IIRC, rpm has a status check thingy that will check for
    missing files, wrong permits, etc. If the yum update really borked and
    got something into the rpm database as installed completed and that is
    erroneous, can't you ID the borked components with rpm and then do an
    install with force of the identified components?

    Although I love fully automated everything (NOT!) I never leave myself
    in a state where only they can do what I want. But I'm a really old CLI
    guy that has total mistrust of the Graphical Useless Interface.

    HTH
    Missing files are not really the big problem. Extra files leftover from
    not un-installing the old packages and some number of new packages that
    did not get the post-install scripts run are the big problems.
    Can't you rpm -qa --last and re-install every rpm on the date of the failed
    yum run?



    --

    MailScanner is like deodorant...
    You hope everybody uses it, and
    you notice quickly if they don't!!!!
  • Barry L. Kline at May 4, 2006 at 12:20 pm

    Scott Silva wrote:
    Adam Gibson spake the following on 5/3/2006 8:29 AM:
    Can't you rpm -qa --last and re-install every rpm on the date of the failed
    yum run?
    That's a good suggestion. At least it gives me a complete list of
    everything that was updated, allowing me to go from there. I can then
    use the --scripts option to RPM to give me something to look at for
    seeing what is being executed in the cleanup.

    Thanks!
  • Barry L. Kline at May 2, 2006 at 8:55 pm

    Adam Gibson wrote:

    My solution was to create a script that did a 'yum check-update',
    This is a superb idea and one that I'm going to implement myself.
    I wish yum had an option to do this. I would call it
    --cleanup-after-each-package :).
    My kingdom for this option!
  • Karanbir Singh at May 3, 2006 at 12:13 am

    Barry L. Kline wrote:
    I wish yum had an option to do this. I would call it
    --cleanup-after-each-package :).
    My kingdom for this option!
    a bleeding edge version of rpm under the hood will solve this issue for
    you ( rather, give this feature to you ) - but its going to break pretty
    much everything on CentOS4's pkg management side of things :)

    CentOS 5.... might have this..

    --
    Karanbir Singh : http://www.karan.org/ : 2522219@icq
  • Barry L. Kline at May 3, 2006 at 1:58 pm

    Karanbir Singh wrote:
    a bleeding edge version of rpm under the hood will solve this issue for
    you ( rather, give this feature to you ) - but its going to break pretty
    much everything on CentOS4's pkg management side of things :)

    CentOS 5.... might have this..
    I think I'll wait for CentOS 5...

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postedMay 2, '06 at 7:40p
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