FAQ

Michael Peuser schrieb:
Hi,
yes there is more than just Unix in the world ;-)
Windows directories have no means to specify their contents type in any way.
That's even more true with linux/unix, as there is no need to do
any stuff like line-terminator conversion.
The approved method is using three-letter extensions, though this rule is
not strictly followed (lot of files without extension nowadays!)

When I had a similar problem I read 1000 characters, counted the amount of
<32 and >255 characters and classified it "binary when this qota exceeded
20%. I have no idea whether it will work good with chinese unicode files or
some funny depositories or project files that store uncompressed texts....
based on the idea from Mr. "bromden", why not use mimetypes.MimeTypes()
and guess_type('file://...') and analye the returned string.
This should work on windows / linux / unix / whatever.


Karl

KIndly
Michael P

"Sami Viitanen" <none at none.net> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:v7p_a.1558$k4.32814 at news2.nokia.com...
Works well in Unix but I'm making a script that works on both
Unix and Windows.

Win doesn't have that 'file -bi' command.

"bromden" <bromden at gazeta.pl.no.spam> wrote in message
news:bhd559$ku9$1 at absinth.dialog.net.pl...
How can I check if a file is binary or text?
import os
f = os.popen('file -bi test.py', 'r')
f.read().startswith('text')
1

(btw, f.read() returns 'text/x-java; charset=us-ascii\n')

--
bromden[at]gazeta.pl

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