FAQ
Hi all!

This thread is getting a bit ridiculous. There are lot of ad-hominem attacks
here, which I don't like.

If you have some factual critique about perlmeme.org, perl-begin.berlios or
learn.perl.org, don't hesitate to voice it. It is possible all three of the
sites could use some work, and outlining the problems is the first step for
the cure. However, if you're going to insult someone for pointing out
problems, you're not going to be effective.

So please stick to the facts. And if you feel like correcting one thing or
another, please also consider sending a patch against the source of one site
or another. Complaining is easy, but correcting the problem is more rewarding
for both parties.

A constructive criticism to Randal and other similar participants in this
discussion: you would be much more effective if you will be less insulting
and flambouyant, and more pleasant, controlled, supportive, complimentary,
and as a general rule, friendlier and less socially challenged.

No one is born with good social engineering skills - it is something you work
on. Not only it is worth your time to develop such skills, but you'll be
better off in any regards. Randal is a wonderful Perl hacker, tutor and
writer. But he could be much less controversial if he controlled his temper,
and stopped accusing people of doing the worst actions since not shipping
bread loafs sliced.[1]

Finally, I should also note that it is my humble opinion that we should not
attack people for starting their own Perl beginners' portals, tutorials,
resources, forums, Wikis or whatever. There are tens if not hundreds of such
resources for PHP, Java, Visual Basic each, and it only made them more
popular. I don't see a point in trying to prevent duplicate effort,
especially considering how much busy the .perl.org admins (Ask Bjorn Hansen,
etc.) are and how much more straightforward it is to set up one's own site
where one or his community have complete control.

Regards,

Shlomi Fish

[1] - I should note that friendliness/social engineering and contribution to
society are not one and the same. Some of the greatest past and present
villains were very friendly and hospitable (re Al Capone). Some of the
greatest value producers were antipathic (re Henry Ford). Nevertheless,
social engineering helps you become better at contributing values to society,
and enable you to gather more help from the outside. So it's a good idea to
have it and it's never too late to gain it.
On Monday 03 October 2005 23:26, george.magklaras@biotek.uio.no wrote:
I guess you need the money. You know, to pay those legal fees and all.
Now this comment #really# contributes to the point you want to make. You
couldn't possibly go lower than this. Bravo!

GM
--

---------------------------------------------------------------------
Shlomi Fish shlomif@iglu.org.il
Homepage: http://www.shlomifish.org/

95% of the programmers consider 95% of the code they did not write, in the
bottom 5%.

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postedOct 1, '05 at 6:15p
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