Well, the point (as IanJ also made) is that you have to do one thing at a time. Learn the language (Ruby), learn the quirks and conventions of Rails, learn to test and debug the hard way. Then add integrated testing. It's a steep learning curve, just learning how to program. If you don't develop your basic debugging skills at that point, you never will.

I'm a bit of a dinosaur myself, having worked in all sorts of environments for a long time. Using Rails is not my choice and the more I see, the less I like it for the kinds of apps that I am developing. But it has its undoubted benefits as a proof-of-concept, quick and dirty way of setting up things really fast.

Integrated testing is for professionals doing mission-critical work. I've been there and employed a lot of programmers through the years. What makes the difference between a good and a mediocre (or even bad) programmer is the ability to find and correct his own errors. If you don't develop that ability from the ground up, no amount of integrated testing is going to save your ass.

Start with a text editor, lots of testing and debugging until you're comfortable with the art of programming. When you feel you are ready for some "real" work, where money or other people's livelihood depends on your code, that's the time to dig into integrated testing.

But then again, others may feel different, fair enough. Multitasking may be something that the younger generation is better at, no doubt, but that never beats proper understating.

-----Oprindelig meddelelse-----
Fra: rubyonrails-talk@googlegroups.com På vegne af Max
Sendt: 20. marts 2012 21:49
Til: Ruby on Rails: Talk
Emne: [Rails] Re: Completely, absolutely and totally new...

I totally agree with Collin. do the testing.

Been working with rails and ruby for about 6 months now (give or take a month) and started with Hartl's tutorial. I also started by usign rails 3.1.x before he had developed the chapter/material for it so there was a lot of debugging, IRC chatting, googling, and digging to figure it out. Got through the tutorial in about a week of part time effort and the testing helped me understand things MUCH more. gave me more to debug and problem-solve but that's what a large part of coding and learning new things is all about.

do the testing.

I have 20+ years of coding experience: basic, pascal, c, c++, c#, VB, scheme, delphi, fortran, blah blah blah. I love learning and working with new languages. this has been a huge challenge because i don't have a lot of web dev experience so in addition to ruby and rails, I've been learning (more) html, javascript, MVC, etc etc etc... tons of fun!

do the testing.

:)
Max

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