Grokbase Groups R r-help March 2002
FAQ
I would like some feedback about how useful is the iESS mode to run R in
Xemacs/emacs?
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  • Anthony Rossini at Mar 13, 2002 at 2:28 pm

    On Tue, 12 Mar 2002, Francisco J Molina wrote:

    I would like some feedback about how useful is the iESS mode to run R in
    Xemacs/emacs?
    Unfair question. So I'll respond unfairly, as well.

    I can't imagine any other way to fire up R than "xemacs -f R". But I'm severely biased, having worked on ESS for a long, long time.

    Maybe a better set of questions are:
    1. what does iESS provide that normal command-line R doesn't
    2. what are the tradeoffs between iESS and RGui
    3. if I don't know Emacs, is ESS worth trying?

    What exactly are you trying to ask? I do have to admit, though, that I almost never type in iESS unless I'm on the phone or a conference call and need a quick ball-park set of estimates/intervals/power calcs. I usually just submit chunks of code from other files (source code, analysis code, or literate programs).
    Once R is running within Emacs, I just work in the source files and perhaps save the (possibly edited) end results as an audit transcript.

    best,
    -tony






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    r-help mailing list -- Read http://www.ci.tuwien.ac.at/~hornik/R/R-FAQ.html
    Send "info", "help", or "[un]subscribe"
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  • David Whiting at Mar 13, 2002 at 6:58 pm
    Hi,

    For a while I had been trying to avoid learning emacs (I got into vi,
    liked it and didn't want to mess with this C-x M-x C-c etc nonsense). I
    couldn't find a way to get R to work intimately with vi, so I recently
    decided I needed give ess a go. I have been working with it for about a
    total of 6 hours and I have a strong feeling that I am going to get very
    hooked (so to speak) on emacs and ess. It didn't take me long at all to
    get used to C-x C-keystroke, M-x etc (it's not nonsense at all). You
    only really have to learn a few key editing features to started and then
    it seems that it is possible to do almost anything once you get more
    comfortable.

    Make sure you take the advice of the docs and save a "transcript" (with
    the appropriate extension) as this will make certain transcript-specific
    features available. For example, it is very handy to be able to select a
    region of commands and clean it to remove all but the functions ready to
    be used to create a program.

    I am not sure from your email if you already use emacs or not. If you
    do, then you will find that ess makes life easier immediately. If not,
    then like me you will spend a short while wondering how to do the most
    simple things, but after a short investment find it worthwhile. Below I
    have attached a short crib sheet I made as I started to learn emacs with
    R. You will notice that most of the notes are related to emacs rather
    than R because once I understand enough of emacs I was able to open the
    R help in another buffer and refer to that.


    HTH

    Dave


    ------------
    Some key keys to get me started in emacs. My particular interest is to
    be learn to use ESS.

    R:
    ------
    M-x R Start R session
    M-ENTER resubmit command and place cursor at beginning
    of next command



    Help:
    ----
    C-h b List of key bindings. Use / to search for regexp
    C-h m Mode based help, i.e. context specific help


    File stuff:
    ---------
    C-x C-f 'Visit' a file, including creating a new file
    C-x C-s Save buffer
    C-x C-c Save buffers, kill emacs


    Editing:
    -------
    C-_ Undo
    ESC d kill word
    ESC DEL kill word backwards
    C-y paste
    C-space start to select a region (mark)


    Buffers:
    -------
    C-x C-b list buffers (in another buffer)
    C-x b <buffer name> change to a specific buffer
    C-x 1 make this buffer fill the whole screen
    C-x 2 split screen into two
    C-x o select the other buffer when screen is split
    C-x k <buffer name> kill a buffer


    Combinations:
    -----------
    C-x C-b C-x o <select buffer> RET

    This will list the buffers, take you to the buffer list, then you select
    a buffer and press RET to enter the buffer.




    On Tue, Mar 12, 2002 at 09:03:00PM -0800, Francisco J Molina wrote:
    I would like some feedback about how useful is the iESS mode to run R in
    Xemacs/emacs?
    -.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
    r-help mailing list -- Read http://www.ci.tuwien.ac.at/~hornik/R/R-FAQ.html
    Send "info", "help", or "[un]subscribe"
    (in the "body", not the subject !) To: r-help-request at stat.math.ethz.ch
    _._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._
    --
    Dave Whiting
    Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
    -.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
    r-help mailing list -- Read http://www.ci.tuwien.ac.at/~hornik/R/R-FAQ.html
    Send "info", "help", or "[un]subscribe"
    (in the "body", not the subject !) To: r-help-request at stat.math.ethz.ch
    _._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._
  • Agustin Lobo at Mar 13, 2002 at 6:14 pm
    (I reply to the Re: message because inadvertently I deleted the original)

    My opinion is that using the ESS interface
    for R is great for people who are used to emacs, and less
    good for the rest of people, because it is less intuitive
    than other editors (i.e., WinEdit). For me it was
    hard to get
    used to the (many) idiosynchratic details of emacs (a minor example,
    few people has a key labelled as META, but the M-... are
    everywhere in emacs). Also, I don't like the fact
    that if you, for example, make an ls() and then select
    and copy an object with the mouse and paste, you don't paste
    in the command line but on the list itself, unless you bring the
    cursor to the command line first. Very
    often I was
    not in the R command line and used to get (and still get sometimes) a
    message: "No command in this line".
    Also, at least in my setup, the begin key brings you on top of the
    ">" instead of on top of the first character after ">".
    Probably all these are minor problems (or perhaps, even advantages) for
    people who use emacs also for other purposes.

    Personally, I like better the Windows gui for R + WinEdit, although
    I prefer linux for other reasons. The facility for printing
    and saving graphics from the graphic window is another very useful
    feature that I miss in linux.

    Agus

    Dr. Agustin Lobo
    Instituto de Ciencias de la Tierra (CSIC)
    Lluis Sole Sabaris s/n
    08028 Barcelona SPAIN
    tel 34 93409 5410
    fax 34 93411 0012
    alobo at ija.csic.es

    On Wed, 13 Mar 2002 david.whiting at ncl.ac.uk wrote:

    Hi,

    For a while I had been trying to avoid learning emacs (I got into vi,
    liked it and didn't want to mess with this C-x M-x C-c etc nonsense). I
    couldn't find a way to get R to work intimately with vi, so I recently
    decided I needed give ess a go. I have been working with it for about a
    total of 6 hours and I have a strong feeling that I am going to get very
    hooked (so to speak) on emacs and ess. It didn't take me long at all to
    get used to C-x C-keystroke, M-x etc (it's not nonsense at all). You
    only really have to learn a few key editing features to started and then
    it seems that it is possible to do almost anything once you get more
    comfortable.

    Make sure you take the advice of the docs and save a "transcript" (with
    the appropriate extension) as this will make certain transcript-specific
    features available. For example, it is very handy to be able to select a
    region of commands and clean it to remove all but the functions ready to
    be used to create a program.

    I am not sure from your email if you already use emacs or not. If you
    do, then you will find that ess makes life easier immediately. If not,
    then like me you will spend a short while wondering how to do the most
    simple things, but after a short investment find it worthwhile. Below I
    have attached a short crib sheet I made as I started to learn emacs with
    R. You will notice that most of the notes are related to emacs rather
    than R because once I understand enough of emacs I was able to open the
    R help in another buffer and refer to that.


    HTH

    Dave


    ------------
    Some key keys to get me started in emacs. My particular interest is to
    be learn to use ESS.

    R:
    ------
    M-x R Start R session
    M-ENTER resubmit command and place cursor at beginning
    of next command



    Help:
    ----
    C-h b List of key bindings. Use / to search for regexp
    C-h m Mode based help, i.e. context specific help


    File stuff:
    ---------
    C-x C-f 'Visit' a file, including creating a new file
    C-x C-s Save buffer
    C-x C-c Save buffers, kill emacs


    Editing:
    -------
    C-_ Undo
    ESC d kill word
    ESC DEL kill word backwards
    C-y paste
    C-space start to select a region (mark)


    Buffers:
    -------
    C-x C-b list buffers (in another buffer)
    C-x b <buffer name> change to a specific buffer
    C-x 1 make this buffer fill the whole screen
    C-x 2 split screen into two
    C-x o select the other buffer when screen is split
    C-x k <buffer name> kill a buffer


    Combinations:
    -----------
    C-x C-b C-x o <select buffer> RET

    This will list the buffers, take you to the buffer list, then you select
    a buffer and press RET to enter the buffer.




    On Tue, Mar 12, 2002 at 09:03:00PM -0800, Francisco J Molina wrote:
    I would like some feedback about how useful is the iESS mode to run R in
    Xemacs/emacs?
    -.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
    r-help mailing list -- Read http://www.ci.tuwien.ac.at/~hornik/R/R-FAQ.html
    Send "info", "help", or "[un]subscribe"
    (in the "body", not the subject !) To: r-help-request at stat.math.ethz.ch
    _._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._
    --
    Dave Whiting
    Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
    -.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
    r-help mailing list -- Read http://www.ci.tuwien.ac.at/~hornik/R/R-FAQ.html
    Send "info", "help", or "[un]subscribe"
    (in the "body", not the subject !) To: r-help-request at stat.math.ethz.ch
    _._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._
    -.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
    r-help mailing list -- Read http://www.ci.tuwien.ac.at/~hornik/R/R-FAQ.html
    Send "info", "help", or "[un]subscribe"
    (in the "body", not the subject !) To: r-help-request at stat.math.ethz.ch
    _._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._
  • Uwe Ligges at Mar 14, 2002 at 7:30 am

    Agustin Lobo wrote:
    (I reply to the Re: message because inadvertently I deleted the original)

    My opinion is that using the ESS interface
    for R is great for people who are used to emacs, and less
    good for the rest of people, because it is less intuitive
    than other editors (i.e., WinEdit). For me it was
    hard to get
    used to the (many) idiosynchratic details of emacs (a minor example,
    few people has a key labelled as META, but the M-... are
    everywhere in emacs). Also, I don't like the fact
    that if you, for example, make an ls() and then select
    and copy an object with the mouse and paste, you don't paste
    in the command line but on the list itself, unless you bring the
    cursor to the command line first. Very
    often I was
    not in the R command line and used to get (and still get sometimes) a
    message: "No command in this line".
    Also, at least in my setup, the begin key brings you on top of the
    ">" instead of on top of the first character after ">".
    Probably all these are minor problems (or perhaps, even advantages) for
    people who use emacs also for other purposes.

    Personally, I like better the Windows gui for R + WinEdit,
    Thanks. But the editor is called *WinEdt* (without the "i").
    WinEdit is another one, mostly known from the days of emtex (a LaTeX
    2.09 distribution).

    although I prefer linux for other reasons. The facility for printing
    and saving graphics from the graphic window is another very useful
    feature that I miss in linux.
    Uwe Ligges
    -.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
    r-help mailing list -- Read http://www.ci.tuwien.ac.at/~hornik/R/R-FAQ.html
    Send "info", "help", or "[un]subscribe"
    (in the "body", not the subject !) To: r-help-request at stat.math.ethz.ch
    _._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._

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