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[Python] Programmers Wanted for Computer Graphics Startup Near Philadelphia

Stan Schwartz
Jan 31, 2004 at 4:07 pm
My name is Stan Schwartz, and I'm a University of Pennsylvania
Ph.D. and an independent inventor. I'm submitting two computer
graphics patents to the USPTO during the next several weeks.
Technologies derived from these patents have application in
several different market segments, including still image
photomanipulation, movie special effects and post-production,
web animation, and video games. I'm developing and marketing one
or more of the applications through a startup company. I've
produced demo output that clearly demonstrates the viability of
my approaches, which I've been showing to potential licensees and
investors. This demo output is currently being generated through
a loosely connected series of scripts. To be productized the
scripts will need to be recoded into standalone "industrial
strength" applications that are much faster, bullet-proof,
and that have slick GUIs. I'm looking for a lead/senior
programmer to participate in and organize the implementation
side of the startup and probably one or more junior programmers.
Successful candidates for the programming team should have some
to many of the following skills/characteristics:


Extensible knowledge of/comfort with math, as exemplified by one
or more of:
Computer vision training/experience - feature location/
extraction, motion estimation, object recognition;
Image processing training/experience - you know what a
convolution kernel is; you've implemented a morphing
algorithm;
Linear algebra training/experience - matrix manipulation,
familiarity with numeric computation packages, such as
Numerical Python, or equivalent;
Art/math programming play, mathematical visualization;
3D modeling, especially for character animation, especially if
you've hacked/manipulated low-level 3D data representations in a
variety of formats;
GUI design/building, graphic design training a plus;
Analysis of algorithms;
C/C++, Linux/Unix a plus;
(Note that I did most of the scripting mentioned above in
Python through PIL and Numerical Python and would consider
doing as much as we can of this in Python.)
Startup and/or major fielded product development experience
required for the lead/senior programmer, a plus for juniors;
Within commuting distance of Philadelphia - we may move and/or
outsource, but this is where/how we'll start;
Relevant educational background is a plus, but I'm more
interested in what you can demonstrate to me that you know, can
do, and have done, than what you've formally studied;
Intellectual flexibility, creativity, and ability to work and
brainstorm collaboratively;
Open-ended time commitment - After growing this, I have
additional ideas in the queue that could be spun off into future
products; and
Demonstrable artistic skills and training in figurative painting,
sculpture, and/or life-drawing are a plus.


We have access to seed capital, and we'd prefer if participants
accept some portion of salary as equity in our venture. If
you're interested in participating, send me a cover letter and
resume at cgstartup at earthlink.net. I'm willing to show you the
demo and provide more details about the technology, although
first you'll have to sign a non-disclosure agreement. The demo
can also be posted temporarily to the web for online viewing,
accompanied by an explanatory phone call.


For Investors/Licensees:
If you're a potential investor in the startup or a representative
of a company that is potentially interested in licensing one of
the applications and are interested in seeing the demo and
hearing a description of the technologies, also under conditions
of non-disclosure, please let me know through the means described
above.


Thanks for your time,
Stan
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15 responses

  • Josiah Carlson at Jan 31, 2004 at 6:27 pm

    produced demo output that clearly demonstrates the viability of
    my approaches, which I've been showing to potential licensees and
    investors. This demo output is currently being generated through
    Hey Stan,

    I don't suppose you'd post a link to a bit of demo output?

    - Josiah
  • Stan Schwartz at Feb 1, 2004 at 12:49 am
    Josiah Carlson <jcarlson at nospam.uci.edu> wrote in message news:<bvgs76$i30$1 at news.service.uci.edu>...
    produced demo output that clearly demonstrates the viability of
    my approaches, which I've been showing to potential licensees and
    investors. This demo output is currently being generated through
    Hey Stan,

    I don't suppose you'd post a link to a bit of demo output?

    - Josiah
    Hi Josiah,
    I don't leave the demo output on the web. For me to temporarily post
    it for you to look at, we'd first have to go through a dance that would
    involve your signing a non-disclosure. Over the next couple of days,
    I'll send you some more information privately about what I'm working on,
    and you can decide whether you want to take it further.

    BTW, some examples of my Python work with images, although not
    directly related to the startup are at
    <http://www.ryze.com/go/metastan> and
    <http://www.ryze.com/postdisplay.php?confidw7&messageid 8102>.
    Stan
  • Josiah Carlson at Feb 1, 2004 at 7:35 pm

    Hey Stan,

    I don't suppose you'd post a link to a bit of demo output?

    - Josiah

    Hi Josiah,
    I don't leave the demo output on the web. For me to temporarily post
    it for you to look at, we'd first have to go through a dance that would
    involve your signing a non-disclosure. Over the next couple of days,
    I'll send you some more information privately about what I'm working on,
    and you can decide whether you want to take it further.
    Stan,

    Don't worry about it. I was just curious to know what it was about,
    beyond "still and moving image manipulation". I love screenshots. I
    also have limited experience in many of the requirements that you have,
    and am in California working on my own PhD in algorithmic theory, so
    that whole Pennsylvania thing is out of the question.

    Good luck to you though,
    - Josiah
  • Jarek Zgoda at Jan 31, 2004 at 8:05 pm

    Stan Schwartz <CGStartup at earthlink.net> pisze:

    My name is Stan Schwartz, and I'm a University of Pennsylvania
    Ph.D. and an independent inventor. I'm submitting two computer
    graphics patents to the USPTO during the next several weeks.
    This sounds like one of these emails, you know them:

    """
    DEAR SIR
    MY NAME IS ANNE-MARIE ABAHA, I AM THE WIFE OF FORMER PRESIDENT SANI
    ABAHA...
    """

    --
    Jarek Zgoda
    Unregistered Linux User #-1
    http://www.zgoda.biz/ JID:zgoda-a-chrome.pl http://zgoda.jogger.pl/
  • Stan Schwartz at Feb 1, 2004 at 5:12 am
    Jarek Zgoda <jzgoda at gazeta.usun.pl> wrote in message news:<bvh1pt$c3q$3 at atlantis.news.tpi.pl>...
    Stan Schwartz <CGStartup at earthlink.net> pisze:
    My name is Stan Schwartz, and I'm a University of Pennsylvania
    Ph.D. and an independent inventor. I'm submitting two computer
    graphics patents to the USPTO during the next several weeks.
    This sounds like one of these emails, you know them:

    """
    DEAR SIR
    MY NAME IS ANNE-MARIE ABAHA, I AM THE WIFE OF FORMER PRESIDENT SANI
    ABAHA...
    """
    There's a copy of my doctoral dissertation in the University of
    Pennsylvania
    library at
    <http://www.franklin.library.upenn.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?Search_Arg=Schwartz,%20Stanley,%20M.&SL=None&Search_Code=NAME_&PID#381&CNTP&BROWSE=1&HC=1&SID=1>.
    Is there anything else I said that you want me to prove to you?
  • Jarek Zgoda at Feb 1, 2004 at 9:02 am

    Stan Schwartz <CGStartup at earthlink.net> pisze:

    My name is Stan Schwartz, and I'm a University of Pennsylvania
    Ph.D. and an independent inventor. I'm submitting two computer
    graphics patents to the USPTO during the next several weeks.
    This sounds like one of these emails, you know them:

    """
    DEAR SIR
    MY NAME IS ANNE-MARIE ABAHA, I AM THE WIFE OF FORMER PRESIDENT SANI
    ABAHA...
    """
    There's a copy of my doctoral dissertation in the University of
    Pennsylvania
    library at
    <http://www.franklin.library.upenn.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?Search_Arg=Schwartz,%20Stanley,%20M.&SL=None&Search_Code=NAME_&PID#381&CNTP&BROWSE=1&HC=1&SID=1>.
    Is there anything else I said that you want me to prove to you?
    Easy, man, relax. It was joke.

    --
    Jarek Zgoda
    Unregistered Linux User #-1
    http://www.zgoda.biz/ JID:zgoda-a-chrome.pl http://zgoda.jogger.pl/
  • Miklós at Jan 31, 2004 at 8:06 pm
    Software patents are evil.
    Hell to them.

    Mikl?s

    "Stan Schwartz" <CGStartup at earthlink.net> wrote in message
    news:2da21d6c.0401310807.671be3b7 at posting.google.com...
    My name is Stan Schwartz, and I'm a University of Pennsylvania
    Ph.D. and an independent inventor. I'm submitting two computer
    graphics patents to the USPTO during the next several weeks.
  • Jonathan Daugherty at Jan 31, 2004 at 7:57 pm
    # Software patents are evil.
    # Hell to them.

    Agreed.

    --

    Jonathan Daugherty
    http://www.cprogrammer.org

    "It's a book about a Spanish guy called Manual, you should read it."
    -- Dilbert
  • Neil Hodgson at Jan 31, 2004 at 8:43 pm

    Mikl?s:

    Software patents are evil.
    Hell to them.
    Unfortunately, software patents are part of the business landscape now.
    They often seem to be comfort blankets for investors ("we have something
    unique that absolutely preserves our market position") rather than anything
    real. To succeed in an interview, one must avoid laughing at the claims to
    uniqueness and refrain from pointing out that the patent actually describes
    a sub-optimal solution.

    Neil
  • Stan Schwartz at Feb 1, 2004 at 5:20 am
    "Neil Hodgson" <nhodgson at bigpond.net.au> wrote in message news:<%rUSb.37510$Wa.14668 at news-server.bigpond.net.au>...
    Mikl?s:
    Software patents are evil.
    Hell to them.
    Unfortunately, software patents are part of the business landscape now.
    They often seem to be comfort blankets for investors ("we have something
    unique that absolutely preserves our market position") rather than anything
    real. To succeed in an interview, one must avoid laughing at the claims to
    uniqueness and refrain from pointing out that the patent actually describes
    a sub-optimal solution.

    Neil
    If you had a friend in the states who could show me that my work was
    sub-optimal, I would certainly want to hire him or her.
    Stan
  • Jarek Zgoda at Feb 1, 2004 at 9:08 am

    Neil Hodgson <nhodgson at bigpond.net.au> pisze:

    Software patents are evil.
    Hell to them.
    Unfortunately, software patents are part of the business landscape now.
    They often seem to be comfort blankets for investors ("we have something
    unique that absolutely preserves our market position") rather than anything
    real. To succeed in an interview, one must avoid laughing at the claims to
    uniqueness and refrain from pointing out that the patent actually describes
    a sub-optimal solution.
    Often Americans don't take into account, that most of the world simply
    don't recognize software patents.

    --
    Jarek Zgoda
    Unregistered Linux User #-1
    http://www.zgoda.biz/ JID:zgoda-a-chrome.pl http://zgoda.jogger.pl/
  • Stan Schwartz at Feb 1, 2004 at 1:02 am
    "Mikl?s" <nospam at nowhere.hu> wrote in message news:<bvh1eq$jjr$1 at namru.matavnet.hu>...
    Software patents are evil.
    Hell to them.
    At one point I would have agreed with you, and I
    agree that a fair number of software patents unfairly
    take credit for work that was already in the public
    domain. Do you think patents are ever justified?
    Stan
  • Miklós at Feb 1, 2004 at 7:47 pm
    Well, I don't have a hostile stance against software patents per se.
    However I have yet to see a single case when I see a software patent as
    justified.
    You know about the "progress bar" case, don't you?
    I think real innovations are of mathematical nature. And mathematics (or
    science) cannot/mustn't
    be patented.

    Fake, business motivated patents jeopardize will the whole IT industry, at
    least in the States.
    Fortunately the fight against software patents seem to show some success in
    the European Union. :)

    Best,
    Mikl?s


    "Stan Schwartz" <CGStartup at earthlink.net> wrote in message
    news:2da21d6c.0401311702.1fd5c019 at posting.google.com...
    "Mikl?s" <nospam at nowhere.hu> wrote in message
    news:<bvh1eq$jjr$1 at namru.matavnet.hu>...
    Software patents are evil.
    Hell to them.
    At one point I would have agreed with you, and I
    agree that a fair number of software patents unfairly
    take credit for work that was already in the public
    domain. Do you think patents are ever justified?
    Stan
  • Miklós at Feb 1, 2004 at 9:46 pm
    -> ..patents will jeopardize..
    -> ..the fight against software patents seems to..

    Sorry about these stupid grammar mistakes. :((

    M
  • A. Lloyd Flanagan at Feb 2, 2004 at 3:27 pm
    CGStartup at earthlink.net (Stan Schwartz) wrote in message news:<2da21d6c.0401310807.671be3b7 at posting.google.com>...
    My name is Stan Schwartz, and I'm a University of Pennsylvania
    Ph.D. and an independent inventor. I'm submitting two computer
    graphics patents to the USPTO during the next several weeks.
    I certainly understand why in the current climate you would feel that
    obtaining a patent is necessary. However, I'd seriously request that
    you check out the arguments at http://progfree.org before committing
    to that route. Patents on software technologies hurt everyone; it's
    just the wrong approach. On top of that, the USPTO has historically
    done an atrocious job of vetting software patents; you run a high
    risk of basing your business on a patent, spending millions in court
    to defend it, and have it be invalidated in the end.

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