FAQ
Does anyone have this book?


http://www.amazon.co.uk/Python-Data-Analysis-Wrangling-IPython/dp/1449319793


I'm thinking about my planned future use of Python and what I want to do
with it. I'm looking to get into data science and using it to train
machine learning algorithms. The following shows the Coursera courses I've
signed up to (10 in total) to learn how to do this.




Should I use Python (in which case a book like this looks useful), or
should I use R?


My R and Python skills are probably on a par right now, but I'm unlikely to
have the time to get properly fluent in both at the same time any time
soon, so I have to make a decision.


The Data Science Coursera course is focussed solely on R, so perhaps I
should just roll with that?


Any one have any advice?
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  • Douglas Houston at Dec 22, 2014 at 8:01 am
    Sorry, forgot the Coursera details:


    http://i.imgur.com/joL2LdF.jpg


    On 22 December 2014 at 08:00, Douglas Houston wrote:

    Does anyone have this book?


    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Python-Data-Analysis-Wrangling-IPython/dp/1449319793

    I'm thinking about my planned future use of Python and what I want to do
    with it. I'm looking to get into data science and using it to train
    machine learning algorithms. The following shows the Coursera courses I've
    signed up to (10 in total) to learn how to do this.


    Should I use Python (in which case a book like this looks useful), or
    should I use R?

    My R and Python skills are probably on a par right now, but I'm unlikely
    to have the time to get properly fluent in both at the same time any time
    soon, so I have to make a decision.

    The Data Science Coursera course is focussed solely on R, so perhaps I
    should just roll with that?

    Any one have any advice?
    -------------- next part --------------
    An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
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  • Rob Schneider at Dec 22, 2014 at 8:07 am
    Have this book (electronic version) and used it a lot. It's really about Pandas (http://pandas.pydata.org) which is to me very interesting.


    There are lots of web articles you can find of R vs. Pandas vs. Python and all that.


    For me, bottom line, is that I can plug in Pandas to the large Python app I work with and use Pandas/Matplotlib to do a small bit of number crunching with it ... rather than struggle to learn and integrate R. As I see what Pandas can do I'll only use more of it as time moves on.


    --rms




    On 22 Dec 2014, at 08:01, Douglas Houston wrote:

    Sorry, forgot the Coursera details:

    http://i.imgur.com/joL2LdF.jpg

    On 22 December 2014 at 08:00, Douglas Houston wrote:
    Does anyone have this book?

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Python-Data-Analysis-Wrangling-IPython/dp/1449319793

    I'm thinking about my planned future use of Python and what I want to do with it. I'm looking to get into data science and using it to train machine learning algorithms. The following shows the Coursera courses I've signed up to (10 in total) to learn how to do this.


    Should I use Python (in which case a book like this looks useful), or should I use R?

    My R and Python skills are probably on a par right now, but I'm unlikely to have the time to get properly fluent in both at the same time any time soon, so I have to make a decision.

    The Data Science Coursera course is focussed solely on R, so perhaps I should just roll with that?

    Any one have any advice?

    _______________________________________________
    Edinburgh mailing list
    Edinburgh at python.org
    https://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/edinburgh
  • Douglas Houston at Dec 22, 2014 at 10:16 am
    Oh no, not come across Pandas before, I'll add it to the list (sigh)...


    You're right about learning R being a struggle by the way.


    On 22 December 2014 at 08:07, Rob Schneider wrote:

    Have this book (electronic version) and used it a lot. It's really about
    Pandas (http://pandas.pydata.org) which is to me very interesting.

    There are lots of web articles you can find of R vs. Pandas vs. Python and
    all that.

    For me, bottom line, is that I can plug in Pandas to the large Python app
    I work with and use Pandas/Matplotlib to do a small bit of number crunching
    with it ... rather than struggle to learn and integrate R. As I see what
    Pandas can do I'll only use more of it as time moves on.

    --rms

    On 22 Dec 2014, at 08:01, Douglas Houston wrote:

    Sorry, forgot the Coursera details:

    http://i.imgur.com/joL2LdF.jpg

    On 22 December 2014 at 08:00, Douglas Houston <
    douglasrhouston at googlemail.com> wrote:
    Does anyone have this book?

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Python-Data-Analysis-Wrangling-IPython/dp/1449319793
    I'm thinking about my planned future use of Python and what I want to do
    with it. I'm looking to get into data science and using it to train
    machine learning algorithms. The following shows the Coursera courses I've
    signed up to (10 in total) to learn how to do this.

    Should I use Python (in which case a book like this looks useful), or
    should I use R?
    My R and Python skills are probably on a par right now, but I'm unlikely
    to have the time to get properly fluent in both at the same time any time
    soon, so I have to make a decision.
    The Data Science Coursera course is focussed solely on R, so perhaps I
    should just roll with that?
    Any one have any advice?

    _______________________________________________
    Edinburgh mailing list
    Edinburgh at python.org
    https://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/edinburgh
    _______________________________________________
    Edinburgh mailing list
    Edinburgh at python.org
    https://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/edinburgh
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  • Mike Mineter at Dec 22, 2014 at 11:58 am
    To comment on the R or Python question....


    As in Rob's case, the choice can be less to do with fundamental
    preference for R or Python and more to do with what libraries are
    already available for the kind of work to be done; and with what other
    libraries I need to work.


    A bridge does exist with RPy2 - I've only used that with simple R
    calculations being called from Python but success depended on a)
    having R installed with the necessary shared libraries being built, b)
    the correct version of readline. On one machine it worked easily; on
    another I decided just to translate small R functions to python
    instead of fighting the installations to get RPy2 to go.


    Mike






    Quoting Douglas Houston <douglasrhouston@googlemail.com> on Mon, 22
    Dec 2014 10:16:35 +0000:

    Oh no, not come across Pandas before, I'll add it to the list (sigh)...

    You're right about learning R being a struggle by the way.
    On 22 December 2014 at 08:07, Rob Schneider wrote:

    Have this book (electronic version) and used it a lot. It's really about
    Pandas (http://pandas.pydata.org) which is to me very interesting.

    There are lots of web articles you can find of R vs. Pandas vs. Python and
    all that.

    For me, bottom line, is that I can plug in Pandas to the large Python app
    I work with and use Pandas/Matplotlib to do a small bit of number crunching
    with it ... rather than struggle to learn and integrate R. As I see what
    Pandas can do I'll only use more of it as time moves on.

    --rms


    On 22 Dec 2014, at 08:01, Douglas Houston <douglasrhouston@googlemail.com>
    wrote:
    Sorry, forgot the Coursera details:

    http://i.imgur.com/joL2LdF.jpg

    On 22 December 2014 at 08:00, Douglas Houston <
    douglasrhouston at googlemail.com> wrote:
    Does anyone have this book?

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Python-Data-Analysis-Wrangling-IPython/dp/1449319793
    I'm thinking about my planned future use of Python and what I want to do
    with it. I'm looking to get into data science and using it to train
    machine learning algorithms. The following shows the Coursera courses I've
    signed up to (10 in total) to learn how to do this.

    Should I use Python (in which case a book like this looks useful), or
    should I use R?
    My R and Python skills are probably on a par right now, but I'm unlikely
    to have the time to get properly fluent in both at the same time any time
    soon, so I have to make a decision.
    The Data Science Coursera course is focussed solely on R, so perhaps I
    should just roll with that?
    Any one have any advice?

    _______________________________________________
    Edinburgh mailing list
    Edinburgh at python.org
    https://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/edinburgh
    _______________________________________________
    Edinburgh mailing list
    Edinburgh at python.org
    https://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/edinburgh





    --
    ________________________________________


    Dr Mike Mineter
    Room 352, Grant Institute
    0131 651 9094




    --
    The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in
    Scotland, with registration number SC005336.
  • Douglas Houston at Dec 22, 2014 at 11:05 am
    Also if anyone does any machine learning please feel free to recommend me a
    book (for beginners) on that, too ...


    On 22 December 2014 at 08:07, Rob Schneider wrote:

    Have this book (electronic version) and used it a lot. It's really about
    Pandas (http://pandas.pydata.org) which is to me very interesting.

    There are lots of web articles you can find of R vs. Pandas vs. Python and
    all that.

    For me, bottom line, is that I can plug in Pandas to the large Python app
    I work with and use Pandas/Matplotlib to do a small bit of number crunching
    with it ... rather than struggle to learn and integrate R. As I see what
    Pandas can do I'll only use more of it as time moves on.

    --rms

    On 22 Dec 2014, at 08:01, Douglas Houston wrote:

    Sorry, forgot the Coursera details:

    http://i.imgur.com/joL2LdF.jpg

    On 22 December 2014 at 08:00, Douglas Houston <
    douglasrhouston at googlemail.com> wrote:
    Does anyone have this book?

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Python-Data-Analysis-Wrangling-IPython/dp/1449319793
    I'm thinking about my planned future use of Python and what I want to do
    with it. I'm looking to get into data science and using it to train
    machine learning algorithms. The following shows the Coursera courses I've
    signed up to (10 in total) to learn how to do this.

    Should I use Python (in which case a book like this looks useful), or
    should I use R?
    My R and Python skills are probably on a par right now, but I'm unlikely
    to have the time to get properly fluent in both at the same time any time
    soon, so I have to make a decision.
    The Data Science Coursera course is focussed solely on R, so perhaps I
    should just roll with that?
    Any one have any advice?

    _______________________________________________
    Edinburgh mailing list
    Edinburgh at python.org
    https://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/edinburgh
    _______________________________________________
    Edinburgh mailing list
    Edinburgh at python.org
    https://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/edinburgh
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  • Alisdair Tullo at Dec 22, 2014 at 4:18 pm
    Hi,

    On Mon, December 22, 2014 8:00 am, Douglas Houston wrote:
    I'm thinking about my planned future use of Python and what I want to do
    with it. I'm looking to get into data science and using it to train
    machine learning algorithms. The following shows the Coursera courses
    I've signed up to (10 in total) to learn how to do this.


    Should I use Python (in which case a book like this looks useful), or
    should I use R?

    I haven't delved into the R tools available, but at PyData the prevailing
    view seemed to be that the scikit-learn module is about as good as it gets
    in terms of freely available software for machine learning. (Of course,
    this was a meeting dedicated to Python!)

    The Data Science Coursera course is focussed solely on R, so perhaps I
    should just roll with that?

    Certainly -- and even if you decide to go with Python the rest of the
    time, it will teach you the relevant mathematical techniques and when they
    can be applied which is really the core of the matter. pandas was already
    mentioned, the pandas DataFrame structure is pretty much the same as an R
    data frame, although the syntax is different.


    If you're looking to install the Python science stack I'd recommend the
    Anaconda distribution:


    http://www.continuum.io/downloads


    Good Luck


    Alisdair

    Any one have any advice?
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    Edinburgh mailing list
    Edinburgh at python.org
    https://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/edinburgh

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