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[scala-user] What's the state of Scala.NET?

Andrew Pennebaker
Jan 22, 2013 at 5:21 pm
Is Scala.NET dead? That would suck, because I'd love to use Scala to write
all my software, including Windows RT apps.
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7 responses

  • Jason Zaugg at Jan 22, 2013 at 5:45 pm

    On Tue, Jan 22, 2013 at 6:21 PM, Andrew Pennebaker wrote:

    Is Scala.NET dead? That would suck, because I'd love to use Scala to write
    all my software, including Windows RT apps.

    There is currently no one assigned on the EFPL or Typesafe teams to pursue
    this; we are focusing on the JVM. The backend will actually be removed from
    the distribution in Scala 2.11.

    -jason
  • Rüdiger Klaehn at Jan 22, 2013 at 6:08 pm
    Isn't the native langage to develop Windows RT apps a proprietary extension
    of C++? So using something like an embedded VM like Avian (see recent
    discussion) and the C++ Windows RT API might be a better way.
    On Tue, Jan 22, 2013 at 6:21 PM, Andrew Pennebaker wrote:

    Is Scala.NET dead? That would suck, because I'd love to use Scala to write
    all my software, including Windows RT apps.
  • Simon Ochsenreither at Jan 22, 2013 at 7:08 pm

    Isn't the native langage to develop Windows RT apps a proprietary
    extension of C++? So using something like an embedded VM like Avian (see
    recent discussion) and the C++ Windows RT API might be a better way.
    As far as I know, JIT compilation is impossible with Windows RT (with
    generous exceptions to the VM implementations of Microsoft itself).

    As a general note, all these porting projects with “unknown” status or
    roadmap are a huge concern to me.

    We have now Scala-GWT, Scala.NET, Scala-LLVM, js-scala and probably a few
    others. It is completely unclear to me if there are any plans or intentions
    of ever bringing them to a shippable or even supported state, but the mere
    existence of these projects prevents interested people from creating their
    own projects.

    Considering that most languages these days don't ship anymore without a JS
    backend and are in general designed to be portable, it's alarming that
    pretty much every backend except the JVM one is in some sort of dead/frozen
    state. I don't want to imagine what happens when Typesafe's relationship
    with Oracle turns sour and we have absolutely no alternative backend
    available.
  • Oliver Ruebenacker at Jan 22, 2013 at 8:04 pm
    Hello,

    On Tue, Jan 22, 2013 at 2:08 PM, Simon Ochsenreither
    wrote:
    Considering that most languages these days don't ship anymore without a JS
    backend and are in general designed to be portable, it's alarming that
    pretty much every backend except the JVM one is in some sort of dead/frozen
    state. I don't want to imagine what happens when Typesafe's relationship
    with Oracle turns sour and we have absolutely no alternative backend
    available.
    Is that a major concern considering that Oracle has no monopoly on
    building JVMs (although they may have a quasi-monopoly on specs)?

    Take care
    Oliver

    --
    IT Project Lead at PanGenX (http://www.pangenx.com)
    The purpose is always improvement
  • Rex Kerr at Jan 22, 2013 at 8:08 pm
    Given J9, Azul, and further afield Dalvik and Avian and Doppio, I'd say no,
    probably not that much of a concern.

    --Rex

    On Tue, Jan 22, 2013 at 3:04 PM, Oliver Ruebenacker wrote:

    Hello,

    On Tue, Jan 22, 2013 at 2:08 PM, Simon Ochsenreither
    wrote:
    Considering that most languages these days don't ship anymore without a JS
    backend and are in general designed to be portable, it's alarming that
    pretty much every backend except the JVM one is in some sort of
    dead/frozen
    state. I don't want to imagine what happens when Typesafe's relationship
    with Oracle turns sour and we have absolutely no alternative backend
    available.
    Is that a major concern considering that Oracle has no monopoly on
    building JVMs (although they may have a quasi-monopoly on specs)?

    Take care
    Oliver

    --
    IT Project Lead at PanGenX (http://www.pangenx.com)
    The purpose is always improvement
  • Dave at Jan 22, 2013 at 7:48 pm
    Alternatively you could try to compile the jars with the ikvm bytecode
    compiler to .NET
    http://www.ikvm.net/

    scala.NET uses the IKVM libraries too but it compiles from source code.

    Op dinsdag 22 januari 2013 18:21:43 UTC+1 schreef Andrew Pennebaker het
    volgende:
    Is Scala.NET dead? That would suck, because I'd love to use Scala to write
    all my software, including Windows RT apps.
  • Simon Ochsenreither at Jan 22, 2013 at 7:54 pm

    Alternatively you could try to compile the jars with the ikvm bytecode
    compiler to .NET
    http://www.ikvm.net/
    Yes, there are many different options, but neither of them are stable,
    officially supported or even maintained.

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