FAQ

[Cassandra-user] [RELEASE] 0.8.0

Eric Evans
Jun 2, 2011 at 11:37 pm
I am very pleased to announce the official release of Cassandra 0.8.0.

If you haven't been paying attention to this release, this is your last
chance, because by this time tomorrow all your friends are going to be
raving, and you don't want to look silly.

So why am I resorting to hyperbole? Well, for one because this is the
release that debuts the Cassandra Query Language (CQL). In one fell
swoop Cassandra has become more than NoSQL, it's MoSQL.

Cassandra also has distributed counters now. With counters, you can
count stuff, and counting stuff rocks.

A kickass use-case for Cassandra is spanning data-centers for
fault-tolerance and locality, but doing so has always meant sending data
in the clear, or tunneling over a VPN. New for 0.8.0, encryption of
intranode traffic.

If you're not motivated to go upgrade your clusters right now, you're
either not easily impressed, or you're very lazy. If it's the latter,
would it help knowing that rolling upgrades between releases is now
supported? Yeah. You can upgrade your 0.7 cluster to 0.8 without
shutting it down.

You see what I mean? Then go read the release notes[1] to learn about
the full range of awesomeness, then grab a copy[2] and become a
(fashionably )early adopter.

Drivers for CQL are available in Python[3], Java[3], and Node.js[4].

As usual, a Debian package is available from the project's APT
repository[5].

Enjoy!


[1]: http://goo.gl/CrJqJ (NEWS.txt)
[2]: http://cassandra.debian.org/download
[3]: http://www.apache.org/dist/cassandra/drivers
[4]: https://github.com/racker/node-cassandra-client
[5]: http://wiki.apache.org/cassandra/DebianPackaging

--
Eric Evans
eevans@rackspace.com
reply

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14 responses

  • Joseph Stein at Jun 2, 2011 at 11:48 pm
    Awesome!
    On Thu, Jun 2, 2011 at 7:36 PM, Eric Evans wrote:


    I am very pleased to announce the official release of Cassandra 0.8.0.

    If you haven't been paying attention to this release, this is your last
    chance, because by this time tomorrow all your friends are going to be
    raving, and you don't want to look silly.

    So why am I resorting to hyperbole? Well, for one because this is the
    release that debuts the Cassandra Query Language (CQL). In one fell
    swoop Cassandra has become more than NoSQL, it's MoSQL.

    Cassandra also has distributed counters now. With counters, you can
    count stuff, and counting stuff rocks.

    A kickass use-case for Cassandra is spanning data-centers for
    fault-tolerance and locality, but doing so has always meant sending data
    in the clear, or tunneling over a VPN. New for 0.8.0, encryption of
    intranode traffic.

    If you're not motivated to go upgrade your clusters right now, you're
    either not easily impressed, or you're very lazy. If it's the latter,
    would it help knowing that rolling upgrades between releases is now
    supported? Yeah. You can upgrade your 0.7 cluster to 0.8 without
    shutting it down.

    You see what I mean? Then go read the release notes[1] to learn about
    the full range of awesomeness, then grab a copy[2] and become a
    (fashionably )early adopter.

    Drivers for CQL are available in Python[3], Java[3], and Node.js[4].

    As usual, a Debian package is available from the project's APT
    repository[5].

    Enjoy!


    [1]: http://goo.gl/CrJqJ (NEWS.txt)
    [2]: http://cassandra.debian.org/download
    [3]: http://www.apache.org/dist/cassandra/drivers
    [4]: https://github.com/racker/node-cassandra-client
    [5]: http://wiki.apache.org/cassandra/DebianPackaging

    --
    Eric Evans
    eevans@rackspace.com

    --

    /*
    Joe Stein
    http://www.linkedin.com/in/charmalloc
    Twitter: @allthingshadoop
    */
  • Aaron morton at Jun 3, 2011 at 2:07 am
    Big thanks to all the contributors and committers :)

    A

    -----------------
    Aaron Morton
    Freelance Cassandra Developer
    @aaronmorton
    http://www.thelastpickle.com
    On 3 Jun 2011, at 11:48, Joseph Stein wrote:

    Awesome!

    On Thu, Jun 2, 2011 at 7:36 PM, Eric Evans wrote:

    I am very pleased to announce the official release of Cassandra 0.8.0.

    If you haven't been paying attention to this release, this is your last
    chance, because by this time tomorrow all your friends are going to be
    raving, and you don't want to look silly.

    So why am I resorting to hyperbole? Well, for one because this is the
    release that debuts the Cassandra Query Language (CQL). In one fell
    swoop Cassandra has become more than NoSQL, it's MoSQL.

    Cassandra also has distributed counters now. With counters, you can
    count stuff, and counting stuff rocks.

    A kickass use-case for Cassandra is spanning data-centers for
    fault-tolerance and locality, but doing so has always meant sending data
    in the clear, or tunneling over a VPN. New for 0.8.0, encryption of
    intranode traffic.

    If you're not motivated to go upgrade your clusters right now, you're
    either not easily impressed, or you're very lazy. If it's the latter,
    would it help knowing that rolling upgrades between releases is now
    supported? Yeah. You can upgrade your 0.7 cluster to 0.8 without
    shutting it down.

    You see what I mean? Then go read the release notes[1] to learn about
    the full range of awesomeness, then grab a copy[2] and become a
    (fashionably )early adopter.

    Drivers for CQL are available in Python[3], Java[3], and Node.js[4].

    As usual, a Debian package is available from the project's APT
    repository[5].

    Enjoy!


    [1]: http://goo.gl/CrJqJ (NEWS.txt)
    [2]: http://cassandra.debian.org/download
    [3]: http://www.apache.org/dist/cassandra/drivers
    [4]: https://github.com/racker/node-cassandra-client
    [5]: http://wiki.apache.org/cassandra/DebianPackaging

    --
    Eric Evans
    eevans@rackspace.com




    --

    /*
    Joe Stein
    http://www.linkedin.com/in/charmalloc
    Twitter: @allthingshadoop
    */
  • Dikang Gu at Jun 3, 2011 at 2:59 am
    Great! Congratulations!

    --
    Dikang Gu
    0086 - 18611140205
    On Friday, June 3, 2011 at 10:06 AM, aaron morton wrote:
    Big thanks to all the contributors and committers :)

    A

    -----------------
    Aaron Morton
    Freelance Cassandra Developer
    @aaronmorton
    http://www.thelastpickle.com




    On 3 Jun 2011, at 11:48, Joseph Stein wrote:
    Awesome!
    On Thu, Jun 2, 2011 at 7:36 PM, Eric Evans wrote:

    I am very pleased to announce the official release of Cassandra 0.8.0.

    If you haven't been paying attention to this release, this is your last
    chance, because by this time tomorrow all your friends are going to be
    raving, and you don't want to look silly.

    So why am I resorting to hyperbole? Well, for one because this is the
    release that debuts the Cassandra Query Language (CQL). In one fell
    swoop Cassandra has become more than NoSQL, it's MoSQL.

    Cassandra also has distributed counters now. With counters, you can
    count stuff, and counting stuff rocks.

    A kickass use-case for Cassandra is spanning data-centers for
    fault-tolerance and locality, but doing so has always meant sending data
    in the clear, or tunneling over a VPN. New for 0.8.0, encryption of
    intranode traffic.

    If you're not motivated to go upgrade your clusters right now, you're
    either not easily impressed, or you're very lazy. If it's the latter,
    would it help knowing that rolling upgrades between releases is now
    supported? Yeah. You can upgrade your 0.7 cluster to 0.8 without
    shutting it down.

    You see what I mean? Then go read the release notes[1] to learn about
    the full range of awesomeness, then grab a copy[2] and become a
    (fashionably )early adopter.

    Drivers for CQL are available in Python[3], Java[3], and Node.js[4].

    As usual, a Debian package is available from the project's APT
    repository[5].

    Enjoy!


    [1]: http://goo.gl/CrJqJ (NEWS.txt)
    [2]: http://cassandra.debian.org/download
    [3]: http://www.apache.org/dist/cassandra/drivers
    [4]: https://github.com/racker/node-cassandra-client
    [5]: http://wiki.apache.org/cassandra/DebianPackaging

    --
    Eric Evans
    eevans@rackspace.com

    --

    /*
    Joe Stein
    http://www.linkedin.com/in/charmalloc
    Twitter: @allthingshadoop
    */
  • Stephen Connolly at Jun 3, 2011 at 8:26 am
    Great work!

    -Stephen

    P.S.
    As the release of artifacts to Maven Central is now part of the
    release process, the artifacts are all available from Maven Central
    already (for people who use Maven/ANT+Ivy/Gradle/Buildr/etc)
    On 3 June 2011 00:36, Eric Evans wrote:

    I am very pleased to announce the official release of Cassandra 0.8.0.

    If you haven't been paying attention to this release, this is your last
    chance, because by this time tomorrow all your friends are going to be
    raving, and you don't want to look silly.

    So why am I resorting to hyperbole?  Well, for one because this is the
    release that debuts the Cassandra Query Language (CQL).  In one fell
    swoop Cassandra has become more than NoSQL, it's MoSQL.

    Cassandra also has distributed counters now.  With counters, you can
    count stuff, and counting stuff rocks.

    A kickass use-case for Cassandra is spanning data-centers for
    fault-tolerance and locality, but doing so has always meant sending data
    in the clear, or tunneling over a VPN.   New for 0.8.0, encryption of
    intranode traffic.

    If you're not motivated to go upgrade your clusters right now, you're
    either not easily impressed, or you're very lazy.  If it's the latter,
    would it help knowing that rolling upgrades between releases is now
    supported?  Yeah.  You can upgrade your 0.7 cluster to 0.8 without
    shutting it down.

    You see what I mean?  Then go read the release notes[1] to learn about
    the full range of awesomeness, then grab a copy[2] and become a
    (fashionably )early adopter.

    Drivers for CQL are available in Python[3], Java[3], and Node.js[4].

    As usual, a Debian package is available from the project's APT
    repository[5].

    Enjoy!


    [1]: http://goo.gl/CrJqJ (NEWS.txt)
    [2]: http://cassandra.debian.org/download
    [3]: http://www.apache.org/dist/cassandra/drivers
    [4]: https://github.com/racker/node-cassandra-client
    [5]: http://wiki.apache.org/cassandra/DebianPackaging

    --
    Eric Evans
    eevans@rackspace.com
  • Terje Marthinussen at Jun 6, 2011 at 5:01 am
    0.8 under load may turn out to be more stable and well behaving than any
    release so far

    Been doing a few test runs stuffing more than 1 billion records into a 12
    node cluster and thing looks better than ever.
    VM's stable and nice at 11GB. No data corruptions, dead nodes, full GC's or
    any of the other trouble that plagued early 0.7 releases.

    Still have to test more nasty stuff like rebalancing or recovering failed
    nodes, but so far I would recommend anyone to consider 0.8 over 0.7.x if
    setting up a new system

    Terje
    On Fri, Jun 3, 2011 at 5:25 PM, Stephen Connolly wrote:

    Great work!

    -Stephen

    P.S.
    As the release of artifacts to Maven Central is now part of the
    release process, the artifacts are all available from Maven Central
    already (for people who use Maven/ANT+Ivy/Gradle/Buildr/etc)
    On 3 June 2011 00:36, Eric Evans wrote:

    I am very pleased to announce the official release of Cassandra 0.8.0.

    If you haven't been paying attention to this release, this is your last
    chance, because by this time tomorrow all your friends are going to be
    raving, and you don't want to look silly.

    So why am I resorting to hyperbole? Well, for one because this is the
    release that debuts the Cassandra Query Language (CQL). In one fell
    swoop Cassandra has become more than NoSQL, it's MoSQL.

    Cassandra also has distributed counters now. With counters, you can
    count stuff, and counting stuff rocks.

    A kickass use-case for Cassandra is spanning data-centers for
    fault-tolerance and locality, but doing so has always meant sending data
    in the clear, or tunneling over a VPN. New for 0.8.0, encryption of
    intranode traffic.

    If you're not motivated to go upgrade your clusters right now, you're
    either not easily impressed, or you're very lazy. If it's the latter,
    would it help knowing that rolling upgrades between releases is now
    supported? Yeah. You can upgrade your 0.7 cluster to 0.8 without
    shutting it down.

    You see what I mean? Then go read the release notes[1] to learn about
    the full range of awesomeness, then grab a copy[2] and become a
    (fashionably )early adopter.

    Drivers for CQL are available in Python[3], Java[3], and Node.js[4].

    As usual, a Debian package is available from the project's APT
    repository[5].

    Enjoy!


    [1]: http://goo.gl/CrJqJ (NEWS.txt)
    [2]: http://cassandra.debian.org/download
    [3]: http://www.apache.org/dist/cassandra/drivers
    [4]: https://github.com/racker/node-cassandra-client
    [5]: http://wiki.apache.org/cassandra/DebianPackaging

    --
    Eric Evans
    eevans@rackspace.com
  • Jonathan Ellis at Jun 6, 2011 at 12:13 pm
    Has this been running w/ default settings (i.e. relying on the new
    memtable_total_space_in_mb) or was this an upgrade from 0.7 (or
    otherwise had the per-CF memtable settings applied?)

    On Mon, Jun 6, 2011 at 12:00 AM, Terje Marthinussen
    wrote:
    0.8 under load may turn out to be more stable and well behaving than any
    release so far
    Been doing a few test runs stuffing more than 1 billion records into a 12
    node cluster and thing looks better than ever.
    VM's stable and nice at 11GB. No data corruptions, dead nodes, full GC's or
    any of the other trouble that plagued early 0.7 releases.
    Still have to test more nasty stuff like rebalancing or recovering failed
    nodes, but so far I would recommend anyone to consider  0.8 over 0.7.x if
    setting up a new system
    Terje

    On Fri, Jun 3, 2011 at 5:25 PM, Stephen Connolly
    wrote:
    Great work!

    -Stephen

    P.S.
    As the release of artifacts to Maven Central is now part of the
    release process, the artifacts are all available from Maven Central
    already (for people who use Maven/ANT+Ivy/Gradle/Buildr/etc)
    On 3 June 2011 00:36, Eric Evans wrote:

    I am very pleased to announce the official release of Cassandra 0.8.0.

    If you haven't been paying attention to this release, this is your last
    chance, because by this time tomorrow all your friends are going to be
    raving, and you don't want to look silly.

    So why am I resorting to hyperbole?  Well, for one because this is the
    release that debuts the Cassandra Query Language (CQL).  In one fell
    swoop Cassandra has become more than NoSQL, it's MoSQL.

    Cassandra also has distributed counters now.  With counters, you can
    count stuff, and counting stuff rocks.

    A kickass use-case for Cassandra is spanning data-centers for
    fault-tolerance and locality, but doing so has always meant sending data
    in the clear, or tunneling over a VPN.   New for 0.8.0, encryption of
    intranode traffic.

    If you're not motivated to go upgrade your clusters right now, you're
    either not easily impressed, or you're very lazy.  If it's the latter,
    would it help knowing that rolling upgrades between releases is now
    supported?  Yeah.  You can upgrade your 0.7 cluster to 0.8 without
    shutting it down.

    You see what I mean?  Then go read the release notes[1] to learn about
    the full range of awesomeness, then grab a copy[2] and become a
    (fashionably )early adopter.

    Drivers for CQL are available in Python[3], Java[3], and Node.js[4].

    As usual, a Debian package is available from the project's APT
    repository[5].

    Enjoy!


    [1]: http://goo.gl/CrJqJ (NEWS.txt)
    [2]: http://cassandra.debian.org/download
    [3]: http://www.apache.org/dist/cassandra/drivers
    [4]: https://github.com/racker/node-cassandra-client
    [5]: http://wiki.apache.org/cassandra/DebianPackaging

    --
    Eric Evans
    eevans@rackspace.com


    --
    Jonathan Ellis
    Project Chair, Apache Cassandra
    co-founder of DataStax, the source for professional Cassandra support
    http://www.datastax.com
  • Terje Marthinussen at Jun 6, 2011 at 1:10 pm
    Of course I talked too soon.
    I saw a corrupted commitlog some days back after killing cassandra and I
    just came across a committed hints file after a cluster restart for some
    config changes :(
    Will look into that.

    Otherwise, not defaults, but close.
    The dataset is fed from scratch so yes, memtable_total_space is there.

    Some option tuning here and there and a few extra GC options and a
    relatively large patch which makes more compact serialization (this may help
    a bit...)

    Most of the tuning dates back to cassandra 0.6/0.7. It could be an
    interesting experiment to see if things got worse without them on 0.8.

    Hopefully I can submit the serialization patch soon.

    Regards,
    Terje
    On Mon, Jun 6, 2011 at 9:12 PM, Jonathan Ellis wrote:

    Has this been running w/ default settings (i.e. relying on the new
    memtable_total_space_in_mb) or was this an upgrade from 0.7 (or
    otherwise had the per-CF memtable settings applied?)

    On Mon, Jun 6, 2011 at 12:00 AM, Terje Marthinussen
    wrote:
    0.8 under load may turn out to be more stable and well behaving than any
    release so far
    Been doing a few test runs stuffing more than 1 billion records into a 12
    node cluster and thing looks better than ever.
    VM's stable and nice at 11GB. No data corruptions, dead nodes, full GC's or
    any of the other trouble that plagued early 0.7 releases.
    Still have to test more nasty stuff like rebalancing or recovering failed
    nodes, but so far I would recommend anyone to consider 0.8 over 0.7.x if
    setting up a new system
    Terje

    On Fri, Jun 3, 2011 at 5:25 PM, Stephen Connolly
    wrote:
    Great work!

    -Stephen

    P.S.
    As the release of artifacts to Maven Central is now part of the
    release process, the artifacts are all available from Maven Central
    already (for people who use Maven/ANT+Ivy/Gradle/Buildr/etc)
    On 3 June 2011 00:36, Eric Evans wrote:

    I am very pleased to announce the official release of Cassandra 0.8.0.

    If you haven't been paying attention to this release, this is your
    last
    chance, because by this time tomorrow all your friends are going to be
    raving, and you don't want to look silly.

    So why am I resorting to hyperbole? Well, for one because this is the
    release that debuts the Cassandra Query Language (CQL). In one fell
    swoop Cassandra has become more than NoSQL, it's MoSQL.

    Cassandra also has distributed counters now. With counters, you can
    count stuff, and counting stuff rocks.

    A kickass use-case for Cassandra is spanning data-centers for
    fault-tolerance and locality, but doing so has always meant sending
    data
    in the clear, or tunneling over a VPN. New for 0.8.0, encryption of
    intranode traffic.

    If you're not motivated to go upgrade your clusters right now, you're
    either not easily impressed, or you're very lazy. If it's the latter,
    would it help knowing that rolling upgrades between releases is now
    supported? Yeah. You can upgrade your 0.7 cluster to 0.8 without
    shutting it down.

    You see what I mean? Then go read the release notes[1] to learn about
    the full range of awesomeness, then grab a copy[2] and become a
    (fashionably )early adopter.

    Drivers for CQL are available in Python[3], Java[3], and Node.js[4].

    As usual, a Debian package is available from the project's APT
    repository[5].

    Enjoy!


    [1]: http://goo.gl/CrJqJ (NEWS.txt)
    [2]: http://cassandra.debian.org/download
    [3]: http://www.apache.org/dist/cassandra/drivers
    [4]: https://github.com/racker/node-cassandra-client
    [5]: http://wiki.apache.org/cassandra/DebianPackaging

    --
    Eric Evans
    eevans@rackspace.com


    --
    Jonathan Ellis
    Project Chair, Apache Cassandra
    co-founder of DataStax, the source for professional Cassandra support
    http://www.datastax.com
  • Terje Marthinussen at Jun 6, 2011 at 2:18 pm
    How did that typo happen...
    "across a committed hints file"
    should be
    "across a corrupted hints file"

    Seems like the last supercolumn in the hints file has 0 subcolumns.
    This actually seem to be correctly serialized, but my code has a bug and
    fail to read it.

    When that is said, I wonder why the hint has 0 subcolumns in the first
    place?
    Is that expected behaviour?

    Regards,
    Terje

    On Mon, Jun 6, 2011 at 10:09 PM, Terje Marthinussen wrote:

    Of course I talked too soon.
    I saw a corrupted commitlog some days back after killing cassandra and I
    just came across a committed hints file after a cluster restart for some
    config changes :(
    Will look into that.

    Otherwise, not defaults, but close.
    The dataset is fed from scratch so yes, memtable_total_space is there.

    Some option tuning here and there and a few extra GC options and a
    relatively large patch which makes more compact serialization (this may help
    a bit...)

    Most of the tuning dates back to cassandra 0.6/0.7. It could be an
    interesting experiment to see if things got worse without them on 0.8.

    Hopefully I can submit the serialization patch soon.

    Regards,
    Terje
    On Mon, Jun 6, 2011 at 9:12 PM, Jonathan Ellis wrote:

    Has this been running w/ default settings (i.e. relying on the new
    memtable_total_space_in_mb) or was this an upgrade from 0.7 (or
    otherwise had the per-CF memtable settings applied?)

    On Mon, Jun 6, 2011 at 12:00 AM, Terje Marthinussen
    wrote:
    0.8 under load may turn out to be more stable and well behaving than any
    release so far
    Been doing a few test runs stuffing more than 1 billion records into a 12
    node cluster and thing looks better than ever.
    VM's stable and nice at 11GB. No data corruptions, dead nodes, full GC's or
    any of the other trouble that plagued early 0.7 releases.
    Still have to test more nasty stuff like rebalancing or recovering failed
    nodes, but so far I would recommend anyone to consider 0.8 over 0.7.x if
    setting up a new system
    Terje

    On Fri, Jun 3, 2011 at 5:25 PM, Stephen Connolly
    wrote:
    Great work!

    -Stephen

    P.S.
    As the release of artifacts to Maven Central is now part of the
    release process, the artifacts are all available from Maven Central
    already (for people who use Maven/ANT+Ivy/Gradle/Buildr/etc)
    On 3 June 2011 00:36, Eric Evans wrote:

    I am very pleased to announce the official release of Cassandra
    0.8.0.
    If you haven't been paying attention to this release, this is your
    last
    chance, because by this time tomorrow all your friends are going to
    be
    raving, and you don't want to look silly.

    So why am I resorting to hyperbole? Well, for one because this is
    the
    release that debuts the Cassandra Query Language (CQL). In one fell
    swoop Cassandra has become more than NoSQL, it's MoSQL.

    Cassandra also has distributed counters now. With counters, you can
    count stuff, and counting stuff rocks.

    A kickass use-case for Cassandra is spanning data-centers for
    fault-tolerance and locality, but doing so has always meant sending
    data
    in the clear, or tunneling over a VPN. New for 0.8.0, encryption of
    intranode traffic.

    If you're not motivated to go upgrade your clusters right now, you're
    either not easily impressed, or you're very lazy. If it's the
    latter,
    would it help knowing that rolling upgrades between releases is now
    supported? Yeah. You can upgrade your 0.7 cluster to 0.8 without
    shutting it down.

    You see what I mean? Then go read the release notes[1] to learn
    about
    the full range of awesomeness, then grab a copy[2] and become a
    (fashionably )early adopter.

    Drivers for CQL are available in Python[3], Java[3], and Node.js[4].

    As usual, a Debian package is available from the project's APT
    repository[5].

    Enjoy!


    [1]: http://goo.gl/CrJqJ (NEWS.txt)
    [2]: http://cassandra.debian.org/download
    [3]: http://www.apache.org/dist/cassandra/drivers
    [4]: https://github.com/racker/node-cassandra-client
    [5]: http://wiki.apache.org/cassandra/DebianPackaging

    --
    Eric Evans
    eevans@rackspace.com


    --
    Jonathan Ellis
    Project Chair, Apache Cassandra
    co-founder of DataStax, the source for professional Cassandra support
    http://www.datastax.com
  • Sylvain Lebresne at Jun 6, 2011 at 3:14 pm

    On Mon, Jun 6, 2011 at 4:17 PM, Terje Marthinussen wrote:
    How did that typo happen...
    "across a committed hints file"
    should be
    "across a corrupted hints file"
    Seems like the last supercolumn in the hints file has 0 subcolumns.
    This actually seem to be correctly serialized, but my code has a bug and
    fail to read it.
    When that is said, I wonder why the hint has 0 subcolumns in the first
    place?
    Is that expected behaviour?
    If it is a superColumn tombstone, yes, that's expected.

    --
    Sylvain
    Regards,
    Terje

    On Mon, Jun 6, 2011 at 10:09 PM, Terje Marthinussen
    wrote:
    Of course I talked too soon.
    I saw a corrupted commitlog some days back after killing cassandra and I
    just came across a committed hints file after a cluster restart for some
    config changes :(
    Will look into that.
    Otherwise, not defaults, but close.
    The dataset is fed from scratch so yes, memtable_total_space is there.

    Some option tuning here and there and a few extra GC options and a
    relatively large patch which makes more compact serialization (this may help
    a bit...)
    Most of the tuning dates back to cassandra 0.6/0.7. It could be an
    interesting experiment to see if things got worse without them on 0.8.
    Hopefully I can submit the serialization patch soon.
    Regards,
    Terje
    On Mon, Jun 6, 2011 at 9:12 PM, Jonathan Ellis wrote:

    Has this been running w/ default settings (i.e. relying on the new
    memtable_total_space_in_mb) or was this an upgrade from 0.7 (or
    otherwise had the per-CF memtable settings applied?)

    On Mon, Jun 6, 2011 at 12:00 AM, Terje Marthinussen
    wrote:
    0.8 under load may turn out to be more stable and well behaving than
    any
    release so far
    Been doing a few test runs stuffing more than 1 billion records into a
    12
    node cluster and thing looks better than ever.
    VM's stable and nice at 11GB. No data corruptions, dead nodes, full
    GC's or
    any of the other trouble that plagued early 0.7 releases.
    Still have to test more nasty stuff like rebalancing or recovering
    failed
    nodes, but so far I would recommend anyone to consider  0.8 over 0.7.x
    if
    setting up a new system
    Terje

    On Fri, Jun 3, 2011 at 5:25 PM, Stephen Connolly
    wrote:
    Great work!

    -Stephen

    P.S.
    As the release of artifacts to Maven Central is now part of the
    release process, the artifacts are all available from Maven Central
    already (for people who use Maven/ANT+Ivy/Gradle/Buildr/etc)
    On 3 June 2011 00:36, Eric Evans wrote:

    I am very pleased to announce the official release of Cassandra
    0.8.0.

    If you haven't been paying attention to this release, this is your
    last
    chance, because by this time tomorrow all your friends are going to
    be
    raving, and you don't want to look silly.

    So why am I resorting to hyperbole?  Well, for one because this is
    the
    release that debuts the Cassandra Query Language (CQL).  In one fell
    swoop Cassandra has become more than NoSQL, it's MoSQL.

    Cassandra also has distributed counters now.  With counters, you can
    count stuff, and counting stuff rocks.

    A kickass use-case for Cassandra is spanning data-centers for
    fault-tolerance and locality, but doing so has always meant sending
    data
    in the clear, or tunneling over a VPN.   New for 0.8.0, encryption
    of
    intranode traffic.

    If you're not motivated to go upgrade your clusters right now,
    you're
    either not easily impressed, or you're very lazy.  If it's the
    latter,
    would it help knowing that rolling upgrades between releases is now
    supported?  Yeah.  You can upgrade your 0.7 cluster to 0.8 without
    shutting it down.

    You see what I mean?  Then go read the release notes[1] to learn
    about
    the full range of awesomeness, then grab a copy[2] and become a
    (fashionably )early adopter.

    Drivers for CQL are available in Python[3], Java[3], and Node.js[4].

    As usual, a Debian package is available from the project's APT
    repository[5].

    Enjoy!


    [1]: http://goo.gl/CrJqJ (NEWS.txt)
    [2]: http://cassandra.debian.org/download
    [3]: http://www.apache.org/dist/cassandra/drivers
    [4]: https://github.com/racker/node-cassandra-client
    [5]: http://wiki.apache.org/cassandra/DebianPackaging

    --
    Eric Evans
    eevans@rackspace.com


    --
    Jonathan Ellis
    Project Chair, Apache Cassandra
    co-founder of DataStax, the source for professional Cassandra support
    http://www.datastax.com
  • Ryan King at Jun 6, 2011 at 4:59 pm

    On Mon, Jun 6, 2011 at 6:09 AM, Terje Marthinussen wrote:
    Of course I talked too soon.
    I saw a corrupted commitlog some days back after killing cassandra and I
    just came across a committed hints file after a cluster restart for some
    config changes :(
    Will look into that.
    Otherwise, not defaults, but close.
    The dataset is fed from scratch so yes, memtable_total_space is there.

    Some option tuning here and there and a few extra GC options and a
    relatively large patch which makes more compact serialization (this may help
    a bit...)
    Most of the tuning dates back to cassandra 0.6/0.7. It could be an
    interesting experiment to see if things got worse without them on 0.8.
    Hopefully I can submit the serialization patch soon.
    You might want to watch
    https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/CASSANDRA-674 which should be
    ready for testing soon.

    -ryan
  • Terje Marthinussen at Jun 7, 2011 at 2:01 am
    Yes, I am aware of it but it was not an alternative for this project which
    will face production soon.

    The patch I have is fairly non-intrusive (especially vs. 674) so I think it
    can be interesting depending on how quickly 674 will be integrated into
    cassandra releases.

    I plan to take a closer look at 674 soon to see if I can add something
    there.

    Terje
    On Tue, Jun 7, 2011 at 1:59 AM, Ryan King wrote:


    You might want to watch
    https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/CASSANDRA-674 which should be
    ready for testing soon.

    -ryan
  • Ryan King at Jun 7, 2011 at 5:03 pm

    On Mon, Jun 6, 2011 at 7:00 PM, Terje Marthinussen wrote:
    Yes, I am aware of it but it was not an alternative for this project which
    will face production soon.
    The patch I have is fairly non-intrusive (especially vs. 674) so I think it
    can be interesting depending on how quickly 674 will be integrated into
    cassandra releases.
    I plan to take a closer look at 674 soon to see if I can add something
    there.
    That's fair. 674 isn't ready yet so its earliest release will be in 1.0.

    -ryan
  • Marcos Ortiz at Jun 6, 2011 at 1:30 pm

    El 6/6/2011 1:00 AM, Terje Marthinussen escribió:
    0.8 under load may turn out to be more stable and well behaving than
    any release so far

    Been doing a few test runs stuffing more than 1 billion records into a
    12 node cluster and thing looks better than ever.
    VM's stable and nice at 11GB. No data corruptions, dead nodes, full
    GC's or any of the other trouble that plagued early 0.7 releases.

    Still have to test more nasty stuff like rebalancing or recovering
    failed nodes, but so far I would recommend anyone to consider 0.8
    over 0.7.x if setting up a new system
    Regards, Terje, Can you share with us a blog post or something like that
    your tests?
    Thanks
    Terje

    On Fri, Jun 3, 2011 at 5:25 PM, Stephen Connolly
    wrote:

    Great work!

    -Stephen

    P.S.
    As the release of artifacts to Maven Central is now part of the
    release process, the artifacts are all available from Maven Central
    already (for people who use Maven/ANT+Ivy/Gradle/Buildr/etc)
    On 3 June 2011 00:36, Eric Evans wrote:

    I am very pleased to announce the official release of Cassandra 0.8.0.
    If you haven't been paying attention to this release, this is your last
    chance, because by this time tomorrow all your friends are going to be
    raving, and you don't want to look silly.

    So why am I resorting to hyperbole? Well, for one because this is the
    release that debuts the Cassandra Query Language (CQL). In one fell
    swoop Cassandra has become more than NoSQL, it's MoSQL.

    Cassandra also has distributed counters now. With counters, you can
    count stuff, and counting stuff rocks.

    A kickass use-case for Cassandra is spanning data-centers for
    fault-tolerance and locality, but doing so has always meant
    sending data
    in the clear, or tunneling over a VPN. New for 0.8.0,
    encryption of
    intranode traffic.

    If you're not motivated to go upgrade your clusters right now, you're
    either not easily impressed, or you're very lazy. If it's the latter,
    would it help knowing that rolling upgrades between releases is now
    supported? Yeah. You can upgrade your 0.7 cluster to 0.8 without
    shutting it down.

    You see what I mean? Then go read the release notes[1] to learn about
    the full range of awesomeness, then grab a copy[2] and become a
    (fashionably )early adopter.

    Drivers for CQL are available in Python[3], Java[3], and Node.js[4].

    As usual, a Debian package is available from the project's APT
    repository[5].

    Enjoy!


    [1]: http://goo.gl/CrJqJ (NEWS.txt)
    [2]: http://cassandra.debian.org/download
    [3]: http://www.apache.org/dist/cassandra/drivers
    [4]: https://github.com/racker/node-cassandra-client
    [5]: http://wiki.apache.org/cassandra/DebianPackaging

    --
    Eric Evans
    eevans@rackspace.com >

    --
    Marcos Luís Ortíz Valmaseda
    Software Engineer (UCI)
    http://marcosluis2186.posterous.com
    http://twitter.com/marcosluis2186
  • Yi Yang at Jun 8, 2011 at 11:34 pm
    Is there anyone willing to upgrade the libcassandra for C++, to support new features in 0.8.0?
    Or has anyone started to work on it?

    Thanks

    On Jun 3, 2011, at 7:36 AM, Eric Evans wrote:


    I am very pleased to announce the official release of Cassandra 0.8.0.

    If you haven't been paying attention to this release, this is your last
    chance, because by this time tomorrow all your friends are going to be
    raving, and you don't want to look silly.

    So why am I resorting to hyperbole? Well, for one because this is the
    release that debuts the Cassandra Query Language (CQL). In one fell
    swoop Cassandra has become more than NoSQL, it's MoSQL.

    Cassandra also has distributed counters now. With counters, you can
    count stuff, and counting stuff rocks.

    A kickass use-case for Cassandra is spanning data-centers for
    fault-tolerance and locality, but doing so has always meant sending data
    in the clear, or tunneling over a VPN. New for 0.8.0, encryption of
    intranode traffic.

    If you're not motivated to go upgrade your clusters right now, you're
    either not easily impressed, or you're very lazy. If it's the latter,
    would it help knowing that rolling upgrades between releases is now
    supported? Yeah. You can upgrade your 0.7 cluster to 0.8 without
    shutting it down.

    You see what I mean? Then go read the release notes[1] to learn about
    the full range of awesomeness, then grab a copy[2] and become a
    (fashionably )early adopter.

    Drivers for CQL are available in Python[3], Java[3], and Node.js[4].

    As usual, a Debian package is available from the project's APT
    repository[5].

    Enjoy!


    [1]: http://goo.gl/CrJqJ (NEWS.txt)
    [2]: http://cassandra.debian.org/download
    [3]: http://www.apache.org/dist/cassandra/drivers
    [4]: https://github.com/racker/node-cassandra-client
    [5]: http://wiki.apache.org/cassandra/DebianPackaging

    --
    Eric Evans
    eevans@rackspace.com

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